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Thread: A general gardening thread

  1. #841
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
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  2. #842
    Moved some rhubarb today, hopefully it survives but I had to fight off a couple hundred blackflies while doing it.
    Last edited by The Backroad Astronomer; 2018-May-19 at 01:59 AM.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  3. #843
    Should start trying getting in the early morning the cooler temps will keep the blackfliess down a little.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  4. #844
    Right now kind stuck in a gardening paradox. Should got ground tilled by neighbors tractor, neighbor also works night shift. No need tilling it until have seeds and parts for tiller. Need to move more rhubarb from behind the barn but easier to do when ground is tilled.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  5. #845
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    No need to water the garden for the rest of the month, so far it's holding up ok but it can't take too much more rain. Flash flooding all around, at least some moles might drown.

  6. #846
    In stead of using the pop up green house if went with old cold frame I built years ago.
    https://twitter.com/BackroadAstro/st...24965619539968
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  7. #847
    Got the second of four plants transplanted the thing is is one original plant can break apart into many plants, now waiting for the rain to water them.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  8. #848
    I can't believe we are still getting frost warnings this late in the year. Today I might take over the rhubarb plants to the neighbor now I know there are doing well and check if he till up some ground for me.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  9. #849
    Neighbor not around and probably be surprised to find a plant outside his door.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  10. #850
    Lucky thing I put out the rain barrels early because it looks like nothing but sun and a little rain in the next couple of weeks.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  11. #851
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    It's pea pickin' time here they're coming in good. Broccoli is past it's peak with all main stalks harvested. Cabbages fattening up, beans close to blooming, tomatoes setting fruit, etc etc, I can't can't even remember them all, ha. Anyways the weather has been almost perfect, rains heavy but welcome. Thinning pears and peaches today, fruits set very heavy this year, hot & humid out there. Blueberries are looking good too as everything plumped up with the recent rains. Corn is hip high, should be ready by the 4th of July with the first tomato. ...gotta get to the grill now, it's burger nite..........

  12. #852
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    It's on now.

    I got home to discover my neighbour laying down fame turf on their front patch. Previously, it was quite barren with a few weeds and some toppled over ornaments. By contrast, mine was a brilliant, wild jungle, thanks to me keeping it watered.

    But now, that's not going to fly. With the fake turf, their side looks neat, and mine, going for wild, can look unkempt, especially once the wild plants (read weeds) stop flowering (and they produced some rather nice little flowers).

    So my free love philosophy of horticulture is going to work against me. Feeling the social pressure (I have the fortitude of wet celery), I joined in pulling up the weeds from our shared border and started ripping up some extraneous weeds from my patch too (mostly focusing on those that are most likely to get in the way of the deliberately planted plants).

  13. #853
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    The problem is that if you're going to a patch of discrete prized plants, those prized plants had better look immaculate.

    Me, not getting the knack yet, liked to get around this by allowing for dense and diverse. All sorts of wonderful different leaves intermingling. It's like that movie Annihilation. It means that not everything has to be perfect because the overall look is verdant.

  14. #854
    Still warnings of frost plants are doing well in cold frame hopefully by the weekend start putting stuff in the ground.
    Here is a picture of one of the horsechestnut trees blooming, we started them off from nuts at my great grandmothers on neighboring road when I like 6 or 7.
    https://twitter.com/BackroadAstro/st...68946702241797
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  15. #855
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    Trying to accomplish something I've never been able to do, and that's getting orchids to flower again once I've bought them. I have no problem keeping them alive or getting them to grow vegetively, I have some that are decades old, but flowering has always eluded me.

    So a month or so ago I followed some links I saved from this forum on orchid growing and did some reading on the matter. Boy, was I making some embarrassing mistakes! To the point I think I'll keep them to myself!

    Still, the measures taken have already shown an increase in vitality in all concerned. Even the ones I thought were doing well are now doing better.

    What prompted me to try was I really want to get one orchid in particular to flower again, and the rest are just along for the ride. The particular orchid has orange flowers and in my whole life I've never seen orange orchids before and I had to buy it right then and there.

    I've boosted their light levels and increased the difference between day and night temps in just one move. From the edges around a south facing set of French doors to right in the middle, on the floor. I've been monitoring closely for sunburn but after a month we seem to be passed that point. Yay.

    Getting all kinds of new growth started and the old growth is fattening up. I'm taking all this, combined with no sunburn, as a good sign I was way over thinking their love of shade.

    Also wasn't feeding them near regular enough. Already had their water needs down as I used to grow bromeliads, both professionally and as a hobbyist and they have similar life styles.
    Time wasted having fun is not time wasted - Lennon
    (John, not the other one.)

  16. #856
    Went to talk to neighbor and he said in a couple of days or by the end of the weekend.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  17. #857
    The lilac bush needed to be prune.
    https://twitter.com/BackroadAstro/st...13754139594752
    (This is the easiest way for me to post images)
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  18. #858
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    Now that summer finally showed up in spades I had to fine tune some of the placements of my container plants. I had to move two big ferns from the south side of the place to the north side, to get less light and wind exposure and move my pitcher plants from the north to the south side to increase same.
    Time wasted having fun is not time wasted - Lennon
    (John, not the other one.)

  19. #859
    I really should stay away form nurseries. went to the local one today spent most of my time and money this after noon there. Got the seed potatoes, some seeds, some herbs because some of mine aren't doing well, a few plants and some flowers for mom which I will plant in some pots around the place. But while there saw a cousin and the owners of the car that looks exactly our own, they said hi and talked for a minutes. l thought I found the belt for the tiller but it looks like it a couple of inches too short.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  20. #860
    Went and got a belt that is way to big but I think I have an idea how to fix that but I will leave to tomorrow. Today I think I will just mow the lawn, not really gardening in my book.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  21. #861
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    2.75 inches of rain overnite perked up the garden veggies but it was a bit much. Had to go out and straighten out the corn stalks that flopped over. This should plump up the cabbages, potatoes and blueberries which are close to ripening. Glad I got the pears thinned out before this rain hit, some limbs were ready to snap from the weight. More rain possible today but hope it passes on by, just north and east of us got 5+ inches. Grass needs cutting here too but tomorrow, maybe.

  22. #862
    After mowing the lawn I checked how well the garden is already tilled and in some parts it is just perfect for some things like squash plants to go in. Just have to careful while steering the tiller to finish up other spots.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  23. #863
    The squash and pumpkins are wilting pretty bad, it could be just them getting use to there new environment.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  24. #864
    Sometimes when transplanting you can damage the roots, and the roots were all tangle up on these guys, and it takes a while for the plants to recover.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  25. #865
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    Root shock.

    Often people tear all the little tiny hairs off of the roots when they remove the soil from around the root ball. Plants hate that. This can be mitigated a bit by removing the soil, if you need to, in a bucket or basin of water. They don't go into shock as hard.

    Also leaving the roots exposed to air too long kills the fine hairs as well.

    On the other hand NOT disturbing the root ball at all when repotting and transferring to a larger pot, let's say, can lead to the roots growing in a circle and not colonizing the new soil. I was a greenhouseman for years. I got to see my own work years later when repotting the same plants. So to prevent this, when you pull out the soil ball from the pot and see all of those roots growing around the outer edge and bottom of the root ball you take a sharp knife and slice four slits down the sides and an X across the bottom.

    Where ever the roots are cut, the roots grow new starting points which colonize the new soil. Oddly enough, this treating seldom results in any serious shock. I believe it's because the fine hairs in the root system are what suck up water from the surrounding soil.
    Time wasted having fun is not time wasted - Lennon
    (John, not the other one.)

  26. #866
    Good thing is it started to rain about an hour ago, the roots were coming out of the cells of the 6 packs. I asked someone if there was frost last night and it was mostly in town.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
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  27. #867
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    Besides transplant shock, planting pumpkins & squash in cool soil can also slow them down a bit. I take it you're much farther north than me, I started my squash seed directly in the soil about 1 month ago once soil temp was above 55F, otherwise the seed might rot. If your season is short you can grow squash quickly from seed in warm soil, pumpkins may need a head start indoors as they need a long season. I use to grow them too but they take up too much space and I had to cut back somewhere.

  28. #868
    Right now all I can do is wait see what happens they are well fertilized I used cow manure and chemical fertilizer and they getting plenty of water right now. Some of the rhubarb did the same thing. the funny thing is right now I have in a pot because the neighbor needed one.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  29. #869
    Just checked most of them o have gotten worse, probably have to get new seed only about $10 but annoying.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  30. #870
    Glom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDon View Post
    Root shock.

    Often people tear all the little tiny hairs off of the roots when they remove the soil from around the root ball. Plants hate that. This can be mitigated a bit by removing the soil, if you need to, in a bucket or basin of water. They don't go into shock as hard.

    Also leaving the roots exposed to air too long kills the fine hairs as well.

    On the other hand NOT disturbing the root ball at all when repotting and transferring to a larger pot, let's say, can lead to the roots growing in a circle and not colonizing the new soil. I was a greenhouseman for years. I got to see my own work years later when repotting the same plants. So to prevent this, when you pull out the soil ball from the pot and see all of those roots growing around the outer edge and bottom of the root ball you take a sharp knife and slice four slits down the sides and an X across the bottom.

    Where ever the roots are cut, the roots grow new starting points which colonize the new soil. Oddly enough, this treating seldom results in any serious shock. I believe it's because the fine hairs in the root system are what suck up water from the surrounding soil.
    Noted.

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