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Thread: Fun Papers In Arxiv

  1. #1411
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    FWIW Department: If my understanding is correct, 55 Cancri e's gravity is about 1.164 that of Earth (same ratio as density), not that anyone will want to go there and try it out.
    I was wrong, the surface gravity of 55 CNC E is, by my (new) math, 2.1 times Earth's.
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2018-Sep-27 at 06:29 PM. Reason: error, ha
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  2. #1412
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    A true astronomical mystery appears in today's arXiv assortment: discovery of a new dark-eclipsing binary, in the category of epsilon Aurigae. What can possibly eclipse a red giant?

    ===========

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1809.09628

    ASAS-SN Identification of FY Sct as a detached eclipsing binary system with a ~2.6 year period

    T. Jayasinghe, et al. (Submitted on 25 Sep 2018)

    ABSTRACT: We report the identification of the bright (V∼13.3 mag) star FY Sct as a long period detached eclipsing binary using a combined ASAS-SN and ASAS light curve spanning 2000-2018. The orbital period is P∼2.57 years and the primary eclipse lasts ∼73 days. The eclipse profile is suggestive of a disk eclipsing binary rather than a stellar component. We also detect ∼0.4 mag pulsations with a period of P∼78 d. The next eclipse begins on September, 28, 2018. Further photometric and spectroscopic observations are encouraged, particularly when the system is in eclipse.

    QUOTES: The All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN, Shappee et al. 2014; Kochanek et al. 2017) has monitored the entire visible sky to a depth of 17 mag in the V-band since 2014. ASAS-SN data is well suited for the discovery and study of variable stars (Jayasinghe et al. 2018a; Shields et al. 2018). In Jayasinghe et al. (2018b), we have uniformly analyzed the ASAS-SN light curves of ~ 412,000 known variables in the VSX catalog (Watson et al. 2006), providing homogeneously classied samples of variable groups for further study.

    Here we report the identication of a long period detached eclipsing binary system. ASASSN-V J184258.61��105928.4 (FY Sct) was discovered by Harwood (1960) with a spectral type of M6, and is currently classied as a semi-regular (SRB) variable in the VSX catalog. FY Sct (l,b = 22:184, ��3:135) was also classied as a variable source in the INTEGRAL-OMC catalog of variable sources (Alfonso-Garzon et al. 2012). The ASAS-SN data spanning 2014-2018 captures a single, deep (A~1:5 mag) eclipse. The similarity of this light curve to the recently identied long period detached eclipsing binary ASASSN-V J192543.72+402619.0 (Jayasinghe et al. 2018c) piqued our interest. We supplemented the ASAS-SN light curve with V-band data from the All-Sky Automated Survey (ASAS; Pojmanski 2002), extending the light curve back to the year 2000 (Figure 1). We calculated periodograms and arrived at an orbital period of P-orb ~ 939 d. Based on this orbital period, we highlight the expected times of eclipse using the red dotted lines in the top panel of Figure 1. The ASAS data captures three eclipses. We see clear evidence for pulsational variability when the system is out-of-eclipse, with a period of Ppulse = 78 d. This pulsational variability resembles the variability of semi-regular variables, and likely explains the current VSX classication as a SRB variable.

    Multi-band photometry from ALLWISE (Wright, et al. 2010) and 2MASS (Skrutskie et al. 2006) provides colors of W1 - W2 = -0:125 and J - Ks = 1:292, typical of an M-giant (Zhong, et al. 2014). The probabilistic Gaia DR2 distance of d ~ 6 kpc (Bailer-Jones et al. 2018; Gaia Collaboration et al. 2018) gives MKS = -5:7, which is also typical of a M-giant. The eclipse prole is suggestive of a disk eclipsing binary (Dong et al. 2014) rather than a stellar companion. The primary eclipse lasts 73 days, and the next eclipse is expected to begin on ~Sept. 28, 2018. We encourage further photometric and spectroscopic observations, particularly during the eclipse, to further understand this peculiar binary system.

    ===========

    The current article makes reference to an earlier one from 2014, which proves just as fascinating.

    ==========

    https://arxiv.org/pdf/1401.1195.pdf

    OGLE-LMC-ECL-11893: The discovery of a long-period eclipsing binary with a circumstellar disk

    Subo Dong (KIAA-PKU), et al. (Submitted on 6 Jan 2014 (v1), last revised 12 Jun 2014 (this version, v2))

    We report the serendipitous discovery of a disk-eclipse system OGLE-LMC-ECL-11893. The eclipse occurs with a period of 468 days, a duration of about 15 days and a deep (up to Delta I ~1.5), peculiar and asymmetric profile. A possible origin of such an eclipse profile involves a circumstellar disk. The presence of the disk is confirmed by the H-alpha line profile from the follow-up spectroscopic observations, and the star is identified as Be/Ae type. Unlike the previously known disk-eclipse candidates (Epsilon Aurigae, EE Cephei, OGLE-LMC-ECL-17782, KH 15D), the eclipses of OGLE-LMC-ECL-11893 retain the same shape throughout the span of ~17 years (13 orbital periods), indicating no measurable orbital precession of the disk.
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2018-Sep-28 at 02:30 PM.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  3. #1413
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    Another curious phenomenon: the companion of a red supergiant is nearly always a giant B star. Why? This paper walks through it, and of course it's complicated but it's understandable and also weird.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1809.10071

    Binary Red Supergiants: A New Method for Detecting B-type Companions

    Kathryn F. Neugent, Emily M. Levesque, Phil Massey (Submitted on 26 Sep 2018)

    With the exception of a few well-known and studied systems, the binary population of red supergiants (RSGs) remains relatively uncharacterized. Famous systems such as VV Cep, 31 Cyg and zeta Aur contain RSG + B star binaries and here we explore whether B stars are the main type of companion we expect from an evolutionary point of view. Using the Geneva evolutionary models we find that this is indeed the case. However, few such systems are known, and we use model spectra to determine how easy such binaries would be to detect observationally. We find that it should be quite difficult to hide a B-type companion given a reasonable signal-to-noise in the optical / blue portion of the spectrum. We next examine spectra of Magellanic Cloud RSGs and newly acquired spectra of Galactic RSGs looking for new systems and refining our conclusions about what types of stars could be hidden in the spectra. Finally, we develop a set of photometric criteria that can help select likely binaries in the future without the overhead of large periodic or spectroscopic surveys.


    QUOTES: ... [V]ery few binary RSGs are known (the most famous being VV Cephei, zeta Auriga, and 31 Cygni). It is not well understood whether the rarity of known binary RSGs is a consequence of a low binary fraction or simply due to some limitation in the observations.

    Binary stars can be detected using several different methods; perhaps the simplest and most widely-used approach is to search for ellipsoidal variations in a star’s light curve. However, detecting binary RSGs in this manner has proven to be quite difficult. RSGs themselves have quite large photometric variations, often on the order of 1 magnitude or higher. These variations can create their own periodic light curves, often making it difficult to distinguish between an orbiting star or something intrinsic to the RSG itself. For example, RSGs are known to pulsate on the order of 80 to 3500 days (Guo & Li 2002), and large convective cells (0.5-2 AU across) and hot spots in their chromospheres have timescales on the order of weeks to months or even years (Chiavassa et al. 2011; Baron et al. 2014; Stothers 2010). Photometric variability in these stars can also be random due to shocks in the atmosphere which excite emission features and large mass-loss events which generally take place at the end of a RSG’s lifetime. All of these variations create difficulties in searching for binary RSGs based on their periodic light curve signatures.

    ...Of the known RSG binary systems (see, for example, the six listed in the Introduction), the vast majority of them contain a B star companion. Could this simply be a byproduct of observational biases? For example, would a bright O star simply dominate the RSG spectrum? Or would an A dwarf spectrum not be visible at all in a binary system? To answer this question, we first examined this from an observational point of view by combining spectra to “create” different binary systems. We then investigated this issue from an evolutionary point of view by determining what types of stars at different masses would be alive during a RSG’s lifetime.

    [[SPOILER: The Magellanic Clouds turn out to be loaded with red supergiant/B-star multiples.]]
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  4. #1414
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    This paper came out two months ago but was just revised. It describes a peculiar multiplanet system of relatively small worlds around one member of a double star, one planet being severely misaligned. The other star appears to have at least one planet as well. Clearly written and a good read.

    = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1806.08368

    A Compact Multi-Planet System With A Significantly Misaligned Ultra Short Period Planet

    Joseph E. Rodriguez, et al. (Submitted on 21 Jun 2018 (v1), last revised 26 Sep 2018 (this version, v2))

    We report the discovery of a compact multi-planet system orbiting the relatively nearby (78pc) and bright (K = 8.9) K-star, EPIC 248435473. We identify up to six possible planets orbiting EPIC 248435473 with estimated periods of Pb = 0.66, P.02 = 6.1, Pc = 7.8, Pd = 14.7, Pe = 19.5, and P.06 = 56.7 days and radii of Rp = 3.3 R⊕, 0.646 R⊕, 0.705 R⊕, 2.93 R⊕, 2.73 R⊕, and 0.90 R⊕, respectively. We are able to confirm the planetary nature of two of these planets (d & e) from analyzing their transit timing variations (m d = 8.9 +5.7/−3.8 M⊕ and m e = 14.3 +6.4/−5.0 M⊕), confidently validate the planetary nature of two other planets (b & c), and classify the last two as planetary candidates (EPIC248435473.02 &.06). From a simultaneous fit of all 6 possible planets, we find that EPIC 248435473 b's orbit has an inclination of 75.32° while the other five planets have inclinations of 87--90°. This observed mutual misalignment may indicate that EPIC 248435473 b formed differently from the other planets in the system. The brightness of the host star and the relatively large size of the sub-Neptune sized planets d and e make them well-suited for atmospheric characterization efforts with facilities like the Hubble Space Telescope and upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. We also identify an 8.5-day transiting planet candidate orbiting EPIC 248435395, a co-moving companion to EPIC 248435473.

    QUOTES: "We now know of over 700 multi-planet systems and a total of more than 3700 confirmed or validated planets to date. From these discoveries, we know that the most commonly known planets with periods P < 100 days are smaller than Neptune, a large fraction of which are super-Earths and mini-Neptunes (Rp = 1.5 – 4 R⊕; Fressin et al. 2013). With no analogues in our own Solar System, our understanding of these planets is limited."

    "Using high precision photometric observations from Spitzer and K2 there has been a sub-class of young stellar objects identified called “dippers” that display large amplitude (>10%) dimming events that occur on timescales of days (Alencar et al. 2010; Morales-Calderσn et al. 2011; Cody et al. 2014; Ansdell et al. 2016b). The observed variability has been attributed to extinction by dust in the inner disk, implying that disks would need to be relatively edge-on..."

    "From a simultaneous global model of all six planets and candidates, we find that the orbit of EPIC248435473 b has an inclination of 75.32°, while the other five planets and candidates have inclinations of 87° to 90°. This significant misalignment of the inner planet has interesting implications for the dynamical history of the system, and may suggest that it had a different evolutionary path than the rest of the planets. Additionally, EPIC 248435473 has a co-moving companion, EPIC 248435395, that is 4200 away and an early M-star. This companion was resolved by K2, and we report the identification of a planet candidate orbiting EPIC 248435395 with a period of 8.5d."

    "From our search of EPIC 248435473, we identified three super-Earth/sub-Neptune sized transiting exoplanet candidates with periods of 0.66, 14.7, and 19.5 days... we [later] identified two additional Earth sized exoplanet candidates with periods of 6.1 and 7.8 days...

    "Given its multiplicity and mutually-transiting nature, the six-planet system orbiting EPIC 248435473 can be classified as one of the Systems of Tightly Packed Inner Planets (STIPs) common in the Kepler data (Lissauer et al. 2011; Van Laerhoven & Greenberg 2012; Swift et al. 2013). However, this system is unique due to the innermost planetary orbit displaying a remarkable 75 degree inclination and a grazing transit. Members of the Kepler multi-planet systems have smaller mutual inclinations, typically within a few degrees of each other (Fang & Margot 2012; Figueira et al. 2012; Fabrycky et al. 2014). Moreover, these systems do not tend to excite high mutual inclinations without some external factor (Becker & Adams 2016; Mustill et al. 2017; Hansen 2017; Becker & Adams 2017; Jontof-Hutter et al. 2017; Denham et al. 2018)."

    "This analysis shows that observing six transiting planets in the system is rare given the known components of the system. No matter which line of sight is considered, the system will appear to contain the six ‘known’ planets a minority of the time. More commonly, the system will be seen as a five-planet system from the most favorable line of sight, and as a one- or two-planet system from our current line of sight. Most of the time, the inclinations of the outer five planets evolve and cause them to reside in non-transiting configurations."
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  5. #1415
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    Recent paper that reminds me of the Tabby's Star phenomenon. One member of a double star has been discovered to undergo optical dimming and recovery over time. It is supposed that this is caused by heavy debris passing in front of the star from planetary or planetesimal collisions.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1807.06995

    Optical dimming of RW Aur associated with an iron rich corona and exceptionally high absorbing column density

    Hans Moritz Gόnther, et al. (Submitted on 18 Jul 2018)

    QUOTES: "In this paper we report on new observations of RW Aur which is a binary system composed of two K-type stars with masses of 1.4 and 0.9 M-sun and an age close to 10 Myr (Ghez et al. 1997; Woitas et al. 2001). The binary components are separated by 1.400 (semi-major axis 200 au, period 1000 years) and are located at a distance of 140 pc. In this paper we concentrate on the primary star which is one of only a few sources with an X-ray detected jet (Skinner & Gudel 2014), indicating outflows in excess of 400 km s-1. The disk mass around RW Aur A is ~0:001 M-sun (Andrews & Williams 2005) and the disk has an intermediate inclination with estimates varying between 45-60 degrees (Cabrit et al. 2006; Rodriguez et al. 2018) and 77 degrees (McJunkin et al. 2013), possibly because the inner disk is warped (Bozhinova et al. 2016)."

    "In a well-sampled lightcurve reaching back to about 1900, RW Aur AB has shown long-term variability and a short dimming event, e.g. a one month long dimming in December 1937, every few decades (Berdnikov et al. 2017; Rodriguez et al. 2018), but it has shown multiple optical dimming events since 2011. The 2011 event lasted about half a year (Rodriguez et al. 2013) with dimming of mV = 2 mag. Another dimming event started in mid-2014 with mV = 3 mag compared to its typical bright state around mV = 11 mag, which has been stable for decades (Rodriguez et al. 2013). The stellar flux reached the bright state again in November and December of 2016 before plunging into a new dimming phase. Lamzin et al. (2017) see indications that the egress from a dim state happens earlier in the IR than in the optical."

    "...[I]n the new 2016 dimming event, multiple signatures show variability arising from material close to the star instead. Shenavrin et al. (2015) report that both increased hot dust emission and optical spectroscopic signatures indicated that there was an increase in absorption by an outflow during the dim state in 2015 (Petrov et al. 2015; Facchini et al. 2016; Bozhinova et al. 2016). Coupled with the fact that mass accretion is more stable during this dim state (Takami et al. 2016), it appears that the recent dimming events can only be explained by phenomena close to the star...."

    "Circumstellar disks are the sites of planet formation... RW Aur A still has a disk at an apparent age of 10 Myr (Woitas et al. 2001), so the system certainly had enough time to form planets, and given the long time scale, it may have formed more planets or planetesimals than typical. A possible scenario is that two large planetesimals collided in 2011 and released a cloud of smaller particles, which caused the optical dimming. After about 6 months, the particles are no longer visible because they are accreted onto the star or settled into the disk midplane. However, some larger fragments of the collision may remain and the collision may have set them on eccentric orbits increasing the probability of further collisions after the initial event. We speculate that collisions caused the dimmings in 2014 and possibly again at the end of 2016."

    "We speculate that the break-up of a terrestrial planet or a large planetesimal might supply the gray extinction seen in the optical, the large amount of gas column density observed as NH in X-rays and also provide the iron in the accretion stream to enhance coronal abundances."
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  6. #1416
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    There was interest here in white-hole theory a few weeks ago. I cannot pretend to understand the theory but the conclusions are interesting. We have not yet found a white hole, though maybe because no black hole has completely evaporated while we were watching it. And where would the white hole be in relation to the black hole that created it? The same place?


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1802.04264

    White Holes as Remnants: A Surprising Scenario for the End of a Black Hole

    Eugenio Bianchi, Marios Christodoulou, Fabio D'Ambrosio, Hal M. Haggard, Carlo Rovelli (Submitted on 12 Feb 2018 (v1), last revised 17 Mar 2018 (this version, v2))

    Quantum tunneling of a black hole into a white hole provides a model for the full life cycle of a black hole. The white hole acts as a long-lived remnant, solving the black-hole information paradox. The remnant solution of the paradox has long been viewed with suspicion, mostly because remnants seemed to be such exotic objects. We point out that (i) established physics includes objects with precisely the required properties for remnants: white holes with small masses but large finite interiors; (ii) non-perturbative quantum-gravity indicates that a black hole tunnels precisely into such a white hole, at the end of its evaporation. We address the objections to the existence of white-hole remnants, discuss their stability, and show how the notions of entropy relevant in this context allow them to evade several no-go arguments. A black hole's formation, evaporation, tunneling to a white hole, and final slow decay, form a unitary process that does not violate any known physics.

    QUOTES: "Crucially, the black hole does not just ‘disappear’: it tunnels into a white hole (from the outside, an object very similar to a black hole), which can then leak out the information trapped inside. The likely end of a black hole is therefore not to suddenly pop out of existence, but to tunnel to a white hole, which can then slowly emit whatever is inside and disappear, possibly only after a long time."

    "As the black hole shrinks towards the end of its evaporation, the probability to tunnel into a white hole is no longer suppressed. The transition gives rise to a long-lived white hole with Planck size horizon and very large but finite interior."

    "This scenario offers a resolution of the information-loss paradox. Since there is an apparent horizon but no event horizon, a black hole can trap information for a long time, releasing it after the transition to white hole."

    "As a black hole evaporates, the probability to tunnel into a white hole increases. The suppression factor for this tunneling process is of order e−m2/m2Pl. Before reaching sub-Planckian size, the probability ceases to be suppressed and the black hole tunnels into a white hole. Old black holes have a large volume. Quantum gravitational tunneling results in a Planck-mass white hole that also has a large interior volume. The white hole is long-lived because it takes awhile for its finite, but large, interior to become visible from infinity. The geometry outside the black to white hole transition is described by a single asymptotically-flat spacetime. The Einstein equations are violated in two regions: The Planck-curvature region A, for which we have given an effective metric that smoothes out of the singularity; and the tunneling region B, whose size and decay probability can be computed. These ingredients combine to give a white hole remnant scenario. This scenario provides a way to address the information problem. We distinguish two ways of encoding information, the first associated with the small area of the horizon and the second associated to the remnant’s interior. The Bekenstein-Hawking entropy Sbh = A/4~ is encoded on the horizon and counts states that can only be distinguished from outside. On the other hand, a white hole resulting from a quantum gravity transition has a large volume that is available to encode substantial information even when the horizon area is small. The white hole scenario’s apparent horizon, in contrast to an event horizon, allows for information to be released. The long-lived white hole releases this information slowly and purifies the Hawking radiation emitted during evaporation. Quantum gravity resolves the information problem."
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2018-Sep-28 at 08:35 PM. Reason: quotes
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  7. #1417
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    Short paper, look at the graphics. The dino-killer asteroid was bad, but what happened in the Archean was vastly worse. We got hammered. Here's the proof.


    https://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/cl...8/pdf/2056.pdf

    Climatic Effect of Impacts on the Ocean

    Zahnle, K. J. (NASA; Comparative Climatology of Terrestrial Planets III: From Stars to Surfaces, held 27-30 August, 2018 in Houston, Texas. 08/2018)

    Introduction: Impact-generated spherule layers provide information pertinent to the environmental consequences of very large impacts on Earth. The spherules are condensed from high velocity impact ejecta ballistically distributed worldwide. These ejecta comprise material from both the impacting body and the target. Much of this material was vaporized or atomized (in the sense of small droplets of fluid, although doubtless some of the vapor species were atomic) in the impact event, cooled and condensed, and then was re-melted or partially evaporated again on re-entry into the atmosphere far from the crater. The energy deposited in the atmosphere by the re-entering ejecta heat the stratosphere where the particles stop to the temperature of hot lava, and thermal radiation from the superheated stratosphere heats the lower atmosphere, any land surfaces, and the evaporate the surface of the ocean; how hot the atmosphere gets and how much water gets evaporated depends on the scale of the impact. The molten or solid raindrops and hailstones eventually fell out of the atmosphere and onto land or into the ocean over the course of hours and days to pile up as spherule beds, and later the finer dust falls out over months and years.

    The most famous example of a spherule layer is in the global boundary clay deposited by the K/T impact 66 Ma. In Europe, far from the Chicxulub crater in the Yucatan, the layer is about 3 mm thick comprising 0.25 mm spherules. The iridium in the boundary clay was the first-discovered signature of a cosmic impact. The chromium isotopes in the spherules imply that the impactor was kin to carbonaceous chondrites. It is still somewhat astounding to learn that there are of order ten spherule layers as thick or thicker than the K/T layer known from the Archean.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  8. #1418
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    Cannot get the entire paper, but it appears worthwhile for anyone into planetary science to get a copy. Looks at why we can't find continental plates on Venus, among other issues.


    https://link.springer.com/article/10...214-018-0518-1

    Venus Interior Structure and Dynamics

    Smrekar, Suzanne E.; Davaille, Anne; Sotin, Christophe (08/2018)

    No two rocky bodies offer a better laboratory for exploring the conditions controlling interior dynamics than Venus and Earth. Their similarities in size, density, distance from the sun, and young surfaces would suggest comparable interior dynamics. Although the two planets exhibit some of the same processes, Venus lacks Earth's dominant process for losing heat and cycling volatiles between the interior and the surface and atmosphere: plate tectonics. One commonality is the size and number of mantle plume features which are inferred to be active today and arise at the core mantle boundary. Such mantle plumes require heat loss from the core, yet Venus lacks a measurable interior dynamo. There is evidence for plume-induced subduction on Venus, but no apparent mosaic of moving plates. Absent plate tectonics, one essential question for interior dynamics is how did Venus obtain its young resurfacing age? Via catastrophic or equilibrium processes? Related questions are how does it lose heat via past periods of plate tectonics, has it always had a stagnant lid, or might it have an entirely different mode of heat loss? Although there has been no mission dedicated to surface and interior processes since the Magellan mission in 1990, near infrared surface emissivity data that provides information on the iron content of the surface mineralogy was obtained fortuitously from Venus Express. These data imply both the presence of continental-like crust, and thus formation in the presence of water, and recent volcanism at mantle hotspots. In addition, the study of interior dynamics for both Earth and exoplanets has led to new insights on the conditions required to initiate subduction and develop plate tectonics, including the possible role of high temperature lithosphere, and a renewed drive to reveal why Venus and Earth differ. Here we review current data that constrains the interior dynamics of Venus, new insights into its interior dynamics, and the data needed to resolve key questions.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  9. #1419
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    I understand just barely enough of this to think it might be important. People who know more can elucidate & elaborate.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1807.06428

    Do particles and anti-particles really annihilate each other?

    Michael K.-H. Kiessling (Submitted on 6 Jul 2018 (v1), last revised 30 Aug 2018 (this version, v2))

    Supported by results obtained with semi-classical quantization techniques, and with a quantum mechanical "square-root Klein-Gordon" operator, it is argued that Positronium (Ps) may exhibit a proper quantum-mechanical ground state whose energy level lies ≈2mc2 below its "hydrogenic (pseudo-) ground state" energy, where m is the empirical rest mass of the electron. While the familiar hydrogenic pseudo-ground state of Ps is caused by the Coulomb attraction of electron and anti-electron, modified by small spin-spin and radiative QED corrections, the proper ground state is caused by the magnetic attraction between electron and anti-electron, which dominates over the electric one at short distances. This finding suggests that the familiar "annihilation" of electron and anti-electron is, in reality, simply yet another transition between two atomic energy levels, with the energy difference radiated off in form of photons --- except that the energy difference is huge: about 1 MeV instead of the few eV in a hydrogenic transition. In their proper ground state configuration the two particles would be so close that they would electromagnetically neutralize each other for most practical purposes, thus giving the appearance of an annihilation. Once in such a tightly bound state such pairs would hardly interact with normal matter and not be noticeable --- except through their gravitational effects in bulk! If the existence of such a low-energy ground state is confirmed it would imply that a significant part of the mysterious "dark matter" in the universe may consist of such matter-antimatter bound states.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  10. #1420
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    The Late Heavy Bombardment, reviewed and put in a new light.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1801.03756

    The timeline of the Lunar bombardment - revisited

    A. Morbidelli, et al. (Submitted on 11 Jan 2018)

    The timeline of the lunar bombardment in the first Gy of Solar System history remains unclear. Basin-forming impacts (e.g. Imbrium, Orientale), occurred 3.9–3.7 Gy ago, i.e. 600-800 My after the formation of the Moon itself. Many other basins formed before Imbrium, but their exact ages are not precisely known. There is an intense debate between two possible interpretations of the data: in the cataclysm scenario there was a surge in the impact rate approximately at the time of Imbrium formation, while in the accretion tail scenario the lunar bombardment declined since the era of planet formation and the latest basins formed in its tail-end. Here, we revisit the work of Morbidelli et al. (2012) that examined which scenario could be compatible with both the lunar crater record in the 3–4 Gy period and the abundance of highly siderophile elements (HSE) in the lunar mantle. We use updated numerical simulations of the fluxes of asteroids, comets and planetesimals leftover from the planet-formation process. Under the traditional assumption that the HSEs track the total amount of material accreted by the Moon since its formation, we conclude that only the cataclysm scenario can explain the data. The cataclysm should have started ∼ 3.95 Gy ago. However we also consider the possibility that HSEs are sequestered from the mantle of a planet during magma ocean crystallization, due to iron sulfide exsolution (O’Neil, 1991; Rubie et al., 2016). We show that this is likely true also for the Moon, if mantle overturn is taken into account. Based on the hypothesis that the lunar magma ocean crystallized about 100-150 My after Moon formation (Elkins-Tanton et al., 2011), and therefore that HSEs accumulated in the lunar mantle only after this timespan, we show that the bombardment in the 3–4 Gy period can be explained in the accretion tail scenario. This hypothesis would also explain why the Moon appears so depleted in HSEs relative to the Earth. We also extend our analysis of the cataclysm and accretion tail scenarios to the case of Mars. The accretion tail scenario requires a global resurfacing event on Mars ∼ 4.4Gy ago, possibly associated with the formation of the Borealis basin, and it is consistent with the HSE budget of the planet. Moreover it implies that the Noachian and pre-Noachian terrains are ∼ 200 My older than usually considered.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  11. #1421
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    An article that has been widely publicized in the science news of late. I would quote from the article itself, but it is dense going and I would rather people read it for themselves to determine whether this is as revolutionary a discovery as the news makes it out to be.


    https://arxiv.org/pdf/1810.00439.pdf

    Upward-Pointing Cosmic-Ray-like Events Observed with ANITA

    Andres Romero-Wolf, et al. (Submitted on 30 Sep 2018)

    These proceedings address a recent publication by the ANITA collaboration of four upward-pointing cosmic-ray-like events observed in the first flight of ANITA. Three of these events were consistent with stratospheric cosmic-ray air showers where the axis of propagation does not intersect the surface of the Earth. The fourth event was consistent with a primary particle that emerges from the surface of the ice suggesting a possible tau-lepton decay as the origin of this event. These proceedings follow-up on the modeling and testing of the hypothesis that this event was of tau neutrino origin.


    NEW MATERIAL:

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.00820

    Recent Results from ANITA

    Cosmin Deaconu (for the ANITA collaboration) (Submitted on 1 Oct 2018)

    The ANtarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) long-duration balloon payload searches for Askaryan radio emission from ultra-high-energy (>10 18 eV) neutrinos interacting in Antarctic ice. ANITA is also sensitive to geomagnetic radio emission from extensive air showers (EAS). This talk summarizes recently released results from the third flight of ANITA, which flew during the 2014-2015 Austral summer. The most sensitive search from ANITA-III identified one neutrino candidate with an a priori background estimate of 0.7 +0.5 −0.3 . When combined with previous flights, ANITA sets the best limits on diffuse neutrino flux at energies above ∼10 19.5 eV. Additionally, ANITA-III searches identified nearly 30 EAS candidates. One unusual event appears to correspond to an upward-going air shower, similar to an event from ANITA-I.

    ==========

    Sample news article, for your evaluation:

    https://www.sciencenews.org/article/...d-model?tgt=nr

    Hints of weird particles from space may defy physicists’ standard model: Two unusual signals were picked up by a detector suspended from a balloon above Antarctica

    By Emily Conover 1:49pm, September 28, 2018
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2018-Oct-02 at 01:54 PM. Reason: add MORE new material
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  12. #1422
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    Everyone loves a violent volcanic planet, and we've got (moon) Io, which is active all the time. The most active spot on Io, according to this new paper, is called Loki. Imagine that. The maps are small but nice.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.00725

    The global distribution of active Ionian Volcanoes and implications for tidal heating models

    Julie A. Rathbun, Rosaly M. C. Lopes, John R. Spencer (Submitted on 1 Oct 2018)

    Tidal heating is the major source of heat in the outer Solar System. Because of its strong tidal interaction with Jupiter and the other Galilean Satellites, Io is incredibly volcanically active. We use the directly measured volcanic activity level of Io's volcanoes as a proxy for surface heat flow and compare to tidal heating model predictions. Volcanic activity is a better proxy for heat flow than simply the locations of volcanic constructs. We determine the volcanic activity level using three data sets: Galileo PPR, Galileo NIMS, and New Horizons LEISA. We also present a systematic reanalysis of the Galileo NIMS observations to determine the 3.5 micron brightness of 51 active volcanoes. We find that potential differences in volcanic style between high and low latitudes make high latitude observations unreliable in distinguishing between tidal heating models. Observations of Io's polar areas, such as those by JUNO, are necessary to unambiguously understand Io's heat flow. However, all three of the data sets examined show a relative dearth of volcanic brightness near 180 W (anti-Jovian point) and the equator and the only data set with good observations of the sub-Jovian point (LEISA) also shows a lack of volcanic brightness in that region. These observations are more consistent with the mantle-heating model than the asthenospheric-heating model. Furthermore, all three of the data sets are consistent with four-fold symmetry in longitude and peak heat flow at mid-latitudes, which best matches with the combined heating case of Tackley et al. (2001).

    [[maps of Io are included in the paper]]
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  13. #1423
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    An excellent short paper (6p) of lecture notes, good for a general intro to the good old IceCube, its crew, and its work. I am sorry to be nearly illiterate on more involved results from IceCube research, so if anyone else knows of a good paper I have missed, add it in.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1809.07873

    Astrophysical Neutrinos with IceCube

    Spencer R. Klein (for the IceCube Collaboration) (Submitted on 20 Sep 2018 (v1), last revised 28 Sep 2018 (this version, v2))
    Thirteenth Conference on the Intersections of Particle and Nuclear Physics, May 29-June 3, 2018

    The 1 km3 IcCube neutrino observatory was built to find high-energy neutrinos that are associated with the sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. Its 5,160 optical sensors detect Cherenkov light from the charged particles produced when neutrinos interact in the ice. In this talk, I will describe the techniques that IceCube has used to search for astrophysical neutrinos. An emphasis will be given to diffuse neutrinos (not associated with a specific source), including analyses of contained events and energetic through-going neutrinos. At the end, I will discuss multi-messenger astronomy, and present an intriguing correlation between a high-energy IceCube neutrino and a blazar in outburst.

    QUOTES: The origin of ultra-high energy cosmic-rays is an unsolved mystery. Somewhere, astrophysical particle accelerators accelerate protons or heavier ions to energies above 1020 eV. Unfortunately, nuclear cosmic-rays are bent by interstellar magnetic fields, so their arrival directions on Earth do not point back to their sources. Despite more than 60 years of studies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays, we have not yet found definitive evidence of any specific source or source classes. One way to find these accelerators is to search for them using a different type of particle: the neutrino. Neutrinos are electrically neutral, so travel in straight lines, and they have small enough interaction cross-sections to escape from even dense sources. They can be produced when nuclei undergoing acceleration interact with either gas or photons in or near the accelerator. The number of neutrinos depends on the density of the gas or photons.

    Because they interact so weakly, a large detector is needed to observe astrophysical neutrinos. Two types of calculations have been used to estimate the neutrino flux, and, from that the required detector size. One used the measured cosmic-ray flux and estimates of the beam-gas or beam-photon density. The maximum neutrino flux occurs when the source is just dense enough to absorb all of the energy from the proton beam; this is known as the Waxman-Bahcall limit. The other used the measured gamma-ray flux, assuming that the gamma-rays come from [[equation]]. Both calculations found that a 1 km3 detector should be large enough to find astrophysical neutrino sources. These results drove the size of the IceCube neutrino detector.

    IceCube has made many searches for neutrinos from different point sources, and from different classes of objects. So far, the only statistically significant positive result is from the blazar TXS0506 +56. On Sept. 22, 2017, IceCube observed a neutrino which was energetic enough to be of likely astrophysical origin. So, it issued a rapid alert response, which led several observatories to perform targeted observations in that direction. Data from the Fermi telescope showed that the position was consistent with a known blazar which was emitting gamma-rays with an energy above 1 GeV. The blazar was in an active state when the neutrino was observed, with higher than average gamma-ray emission. Observations from the MAGIC telescope showed that the source was also emitting photons with energies above 100 GeV. A subsequent search in archival IceCube data showed that the source has emitted a burst of neutrinos during the period Sept. 2014 to March, 2015. Although confirmation is needed, it appears that we have finally located at least one astrophysical particle accelerator.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  14. #1424
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    The most ancient planetary system known: Kepler-444, and the five planets it has had for the last 11 billion years.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1712.06986

    PEPSI deep spectra. III. A chemical analysis of the ancient planet-host star Kepler-444

    C. E. Mack III, K. G. Strassmeier, I. Ilyin, S. C. Schuler, F. Spada, S. A. Barnes (Submitted on 19 Dec 2017)

    We obtained an LBT/PEPSI spectrum with very high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the K0V host Kepler-444, which is known to host 5 sub-Earth size rocky planets. The spectrum has a resolution of R=250,000, a continuous wavelength coverage from 4230 to 9120A, and S/N between 150 and 550:1 (blue to red). We performed a detailed chemical analysis to determine the photospheric abundances of 18 chemical elements, in order to use the abundances to place constraints on the bulk composition of the five rocky planets. Our spectral analysis employs the equivalent width method for most of our spectral lines, but we used spectral synthesis to fit a small number of lines that require special care. In both cases, we derived our abundances using the MOOG spectral analysis package and Kurucz model atmospheres. We find no correlation between elemental abundance and condensation temperature among the refractory elements. In addition, using our spectroscopic stellar parameters and isochrone fitting, we find an age of 10 ± 1.5 Gyr, which is consistent with the asteroseismic age of 11 ± 1 Gyr. Finally, from the photospheric abundances of Mg, Si, and Fe, we estimate that the typical Fe-core mass fraction for the rocky planets in the Kepler-444 system is approximately 24 per cent. If our estimate of the Fe-core mass fraction is confirmed by more detailed modeling of the disk chemistry and simulations of planet formation and evolution in the Kepler-444 system, then this would suggest that rocky planets in more metal-poor and alpha-enhanced systems may tend to be less dense than their counterparts of comparable size in more metal-rich systems.

    QUOTES: The discovery of a multi-planet system around Kepler−444 (KOI-3158, HIP 94931) was reported in Campante et al. (2015). Their photometric analysis revealed five transiting planets with radii between those of Mercury and Venus and orbits within 0.1 AU of the star (i.e., within the orbit of Mercury). Perhaps even more astounding is the old age of the host star, 11.2 ± 1.0 Gyr, which Campante et al. determined from asteroseismology. Furthermore, their spectroscopic analysis of a Keck/HIRES spectrum (R ≈ 60,000, S/N ≈ 200) yielded Teff=5046K and log g=4.6 together with sub-solar abundances of Fe as well as Si and Ti (two α-elements) leading to a moderately large [α/Fe] index of 0.26 dex. Thus, it appears that (low mass) planet formation was already ongoing shortly after the universe was created and that the chemical composition of the pre-stellar material did not have to be metal rich.

    The stellar parameters (Teff = 5,172 ± 75K, log g = 4.56 ± 0.18, ξ = 1.64 ± 0.37 kms−1, and [Fe/H]=−0.52 ± 0.12) and elemental abundances (Table 2) derived for Kepler−444 are consistent with it being a metal-poor ∼K0 dwarf.

    ====

    A significant previous paper is included as it gives planetary masses.

    ====

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1703.03417

    Mass, Density, and Formation Constraints in the Compact, Sub-Earth Kepler-444 System including Two Mars-Mass Planets

    Sean M. Mills, Daniel C. Fabrycky (Submitted on 9 Mar 2017)

    Kepler-444 is a five planet system around a host-star approximately 11 billion years old. The five transiting planets all have sub-Earth radii and are in a compact configuration with orbital periods between 3 and 10 days. Here we present a transit-timing analysis of the system using the full Kepler data set in order to determine the masses of the planets. Two planets, Kepler-444 d (M d =0.036 +0.065/−0.020 M⊕) and Kepler-444 e (M e =0.034 +0.059/−0.019 M⊕), have confidently detected masses due to their proximity to resonance which creates transit timing variations. The mass ratio of these planets combined with the magnitude of possible star-planet tidal effects suggests that smooth disk migration over a significant distance is unlikely to have brought the system to its currently observed orbital architecture without significant post-formation perturbations.
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2018-Oct-02 at 06:09 PM.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  15. #1425
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    http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/4/10/eaav1784

    First exomoon seen by Hubble? Kepler-1625 b has a BIG one.

    Quotes: The search for exomoons remains in its infancy. To date, there are no confirmed exomoons in the literature, although an array of techniques has been proposed to detect their existence, such as microlensing (1–3), direct imaging (4, 5), cyclotron radio emission (6), pulsar timing (7), and transits (8–10). The transit method is particularly attractive, however, since many small planets down to lunar radius have already been detected (11), and transits afford repeated observing opportunities to further study candidate signals.

    Previous searches for transiting moons have established that Galilean-sized moons are uncommon at semimajor axes between 0.1 and 1 astronomical unit (AU) (12). This result is consistent with theoretical work that has shown that the shrinking Hill sphere (13) and potential capture into evection resonances (14) during a planet’s inward migration could efficiently remove primordial moons. Nevertheless, among a sample of 284 transiting planets recently surveyed for moons, one planet did show some evidence for a large satellite, Kepler-1625b (12). The planet is a Jupiter-sized validated world (15) orbiting a solar-mass star (16) close to 1 AU in a likely circular path (12), making it a prime a priori candidate for moons. On this basis, and the hints seen in the three transits observed by Kepler, we requested and were awarded time on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to observe a fourth transit expected on 28 to 29 October 2017. In this work, we report on these new observations and their impact on the exomoon hypothesis for Kepler-1625b.

    One jarring aspect of the system is the sheer scale of it. The exomoon has a radius of ≃4 R⊕, making it very similar to Neptune or Uranus in size. The measured mass, including the forecaster constraints, comes in at log(MS/M⊕) = (1.2 ± 0.3), which is again compatible with Neptune or Uranus (although note that this solution is in part informed by an empirical mass-radius relation). This Neptune-like moon orbits a planet with a size fully compatible with that of Jupiter at (11.4 ± 1.5) R⊕, but most likely a few times more massive. Finally, although the moon’s period is highly degenerate and multimodal, we find that the semimajor axis is relatively wide at ≃40 planetary radii. With a Hill radius of (200 ± 50) planetary radii, this is well within the Hill sphere and expected region of stability (see the Supplementary Materials for further discussion).

    The blackbody equilibrium temperature of the planet and moon, assuming zero albedo, is ~350 K. Adopting a more realistic albedo can drop this down to ~300 K. Of course, as a likely gaseous pair of objects, there is not much prospect of habitability here, although it appears that the moon can indeed be in the temperature zone for optimistic definitions of the habitable zone.

    What is particularly interesting about the star is that it appears to be a solar-mass star evolving off the main sequence. This inference is supported by a recent analysis of the Gaia DR2 parallax (39), as well as our own isochrone fits (see the Supplementary Materials). We find that the star is certainly older than the Sun, at ≃9 gigayears in age, and that insolation at the location of the system was thus lower in the past. The luminosity was likely close to solar for most of the star’s life, making the equilibrium temperature drop down to ~250 K for Jovian albedos for most of its existence. The old age of the system also implies plenty of time for tidal evolution, which could explain why we find the moon at a fairly wide orbital separation.
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2018-Oct-03 at 09:57 PM.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  16. #1426
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    Sounds like an insulting name, but I cannot think of a better one. Interesting read about things worth mining that might make us obscenely rich in the future.

    LATE ADD: Nice photos, too. Occurs to me these ought to be easy to mine, being hardly glued together. The inside is now outside, if you get my drift.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.01815

    Rubble Pile Asteroids

    Kevin J. Walsh (Submitted on 3 Oct 2018)

    The moniker rubble pile is typically applied to all solar system bodies with Diameter between 200m and 10km - where in this size range there is an abundance of evidence that nearly every object is bound primarily by self-gravity with significant void space or bulk porosity between irregularly shaped constituent particles. The understanding of this population is derived from wide-ranging population studies of derived shape and spin, decades of observational studies in numerous wavelengths, evidence left behind from impacts on planets and moons and the in situ study of a few objects via spacecraft flyby or rendezvous. The internal structure, however, which is responsible for the name rubble pile, is never directly observed, but belies a violent history. Many or most of the asteroids on near-Earth orbits, and the ones most accessible for rendezvous and in situ study, are likely byproducts of the continued collisional evolution of the Main Asteroid Belt.
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2018-Oct-04 at 02:41 AM.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  17. #1427
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    So, Mars, what's the deal with its past? Interesting take on it here, that it was generally dry with periods of rain. Lot of other climate addressed. Too bad we missed the good times.

    Color maps, photos, nice chronological diagram of Mars's past ages.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.01974

    The geological and climatological case for a warmer and wetter early Mars

    Ramses M. Ramirez, Robert A. Craddock (Submitted on 3 Oct 2018)

    The climate of early Mars remains a topic of intense debate. Ancient terrains preserve landscapes consistent with stream channels, lake basins, and possibly even oceans, and thus the presence of liquid water flowing on the Martian surface 4 billion years ago. However, despite the geological evidence, determining how long climatic conditions supporting liquid water lasted remains uncertain. Climate models have struggled to generate sufficiently warm surface conditions given the faint young Sun - even assuming a denser early atmosphere. A warm climate could have potentially been sustained by supplementing atmospheric CO2 and H2O warming with either secondary greenhouse gases or clouds. Alternatively, the Martian climate could have been predominantly cold and icy, with transient warming episodes triggered by meteoritic impacts, volcanic eruptions, methane bursts, or limit cycles. Here, we argue that a warm and semi-arid climate capable of producing rain is most consistent with the geological and climatological evidence.
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2018-Oct-05 at 03:03 PM.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  18. #1428
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    Smile

    I'm kind of a fan of supermassive runaway stars flying off into intergalactic space, but I am sure all of us are. I liked this paper, evocative and cool and well organized. I often read papers like this just to visualize it in my imagination, like reading a great SF short story.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.02029

    Origin of a massive hyper-runaway subgiant star LAMOST-HVS1 -- implication from Gaia and follow-up spectroscopy

    Kohei Hattori, Monica Valluri, Norberto Castro, Ian U. Roederer, Guillaume Mahler, Gourav Khullar (Submitted on 4 Oct 2018)

    We report that LAMOST-HVS1 is a massive hyper-runaway subgiant star with mass of 8.3 Msun and super-Solar metallicity, ejected from the inner stellar disk of the Milky Way ∼33 Myr ago with the intrinsic ejection velocity of 568 +18/−17 km/s (corrected for the streaming motion of the disk), based on the proper motion data from Gaia Data Release 2 (DR2) and high-resolution spectroscopy. The extremely large ejection velocity indicates that this star was not ejected by the supernova explosion of the binary companion. Rather, it was probably ejected by a 3- or 4-body dynamical interaction with more massive objects in a high-density environment. Such a high-density environment may be attained at the core region of a young massive cluster with mass of ≳ 10^4 Msun. The ejection agent that took part in the ejection of LAMOST-HVS1 may well be an intermediate mass black hole (≳ 100 Msun), a very massive star (≳ 100 Msun), or multiple ordinary massive stars (≳ 30 Msun). Based on the flight time and the ejection location of LAMOST-HVS1, we argue that its ejection agent or its natal star cluster is currently located near the Norma spiral arm. The natal star cluster of LAMOST-HVS1 may be an undiscovered young massive cluster near the Norma spiral arm.
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2018-Oct-05 at 03:13 PM.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  19. #1429
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    I have a feeling we're never gonna know what that thing was, but it was sure cool.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.02148

    Origin of 1I/'Oumuamua. I. An ejected protoplanetary disk object?

    Amaya Moro-Martνn (Submitted on 4 Oct 2018)

    1I/'Oumuamua is the first interstellar interloper to have been detected. Because planetesimal formation and ejection of predominantly icy objects are common by-products of the star and planet formation processes, in this study we address whether 1I/'Oumuamua could be representative of this background population of ejected objects. The purpose of the study of its origin is that it could provide information about the building blocks of planets in a size range that remains elusive to observations, helping to constrain planet formation models. We compare the mass density of interstellar objects inferred from its detection to that expected from planetesimal disks under two scenarios: circumstellar disks around single stars and wide binaries, and circumbinary disks around tight binaries. Our study makes use of a detailed study of the PanSTARRS survey volume; takes into account that the contribution from each star to the population of interstellar planetesimals depends on stellar mass, binarity, and planet presence; and explores a wide range of possible size distributions for the ejected planetesimals, based on solar system models and observations of its small-body population. We find that 1I/'Oumuamua is unlikely to be representative of a population of isotropically distributed objects, favoring the scenario that it originated from the planetesimal disk of a young nearby star whose remnants are highly anisotropic. Finally, we compare the fluxes of meteorites and micrometeorites observed on Earth to those inferred from this population of interstellar objects, concluding that it is unlikely that one of these objects is already part of the collected meteorite samples.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  20. #1430
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    Short but detailed overview of gravitational astronomy at this moment, with some triumphs.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.02257

    Neutron stars as sources of gravitational waves

    Michal Bejger (Submitted on 4 Oct 2018)

    The global network of ground-based gravitational-wave detectors (the Advanced LIGO and the Advanced Virgo) is sensitive at the frequency range corresponding to relativistic stellar-mass compact objects. Among the promising types of gravitational-wave sources are binary systems and rotating, deformed neutron stars. I will describe these sources and present predictions of how their observations will contribute to modern astrophysics in the near future.

    Quotes: Judging from the lively discussion during and after my talk, the audience saw through my slides and was already aware of the spreading rumor of a new breakthrough discovery, that became public approximately one month later, on October 16, 2017. Indeed, August 2017 was an extremely interesting experience: first binary blackhole merger observation with the global network of three detectors of Advanced LIGO and the Advanced Virgo (Abbott et al., 2017e), as well as the first Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo detection of a nearby (at the distance of 40 Mpc) binary neutron-star merger (Abbott et al., 2017f), followed by a short gamma-ray burst (Abbott et al., 2017d) and broad-band electromagnetic emission observational campaign (Abbott et al., 2017g) and the kilonova study. The detection of a beautiful, surprisingly strong chirp signal from the closest short gamma-ray burst to date, served as the best proof for theoretical ideas put forward by prof. Paczynski: connection between short gamma-ray bursts and neutron-star mergers (Paczynski, 1986) and the physics of kilonova (Li & Paczynski, 1998). GW170817 was the best demonstration of techniques described in this talk: precise triangulation with three GW detectors crucial for the kilonova follow-up, direct ”standard siren” (i.e., bypassing traditional ”distance ladders”) measurement of distance to the host galaxy and independent measurement of the Hubble constant (Abbott et al., 2017a), measurement of the speed of gravitational waves, and tidal deformabilities of component neutron stars. Thanks to neutron stars we now witness a true beginning of the GW astronomy.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  21. #1431
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    TESS is kicking out data at a high and FAST rate.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.02341

    HD 202772A B: A Transiting Hot Jupiter Around A Bright, Mildly Evolved Star In A Visual Binary Discovered By Tess

    Songhu Wang, et al. (4 Oct 2018)

    We report the first confirmation of a hot Jupiter discovered by the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) mission: HD 202772A b. The transit signal was detected in the data from TESS Sector 1, and was confirmed to be of planetary origin through radial-velocity measurements. HD 202772A b is orbiting a mildly evolved star with a period of 3.3 days. With an apparent magnitude of V = 8.3, the star is among the brightest known to host a hot Jupiter. Based on the 27days of TESS photometry, and radial velocity data from the CHIRON and HARPS spectrographs, the planet has a mass of 1.008+/-0.074 M_J and radius of 1.562+/-0.053 R_J , making it an inflated gas giant. HD 202772A b is a rare example of a transiting hot Jupiter around a quickly evolving star. It is also one of the most strongly irradiated hot Jupiters currently known.

    Quotes: Hot Jupiters, owing to their ease of detectability, are the best-studied population of extrasolar planets. However, we still do not understand how these behemoths came into existence. Did they form in situ (Bodenheimer et al. 2000; Batygin et al. 2016), or did they arise in wider orbits and migrate to their current locations (Lin et al. 1996)? If hot Jupiters did undergo migration, was this process violent (Wu et al. 2007; Rasio & Ford 1996; Wu & Lithwick 2011; Petrovich 2015) or quiescent (Lin et al. 1996)? Are the highly inclined and eccentric orbits of some hot Jupiters a consequence of high-eccentricity migration (Winn et al. 2010; Bonomo et al. 2017), or other mechanisms that are unrelated to planet migration (Lai 2016; Duffell & Chiang 2015)? What is the occurrence rate of hot Jupiters as a function of stellar age (Donati et al. 2016)? What is the meaning of the high rate of distant companions (Knutson et al. 2014) and the low rate of close-in companions (Becker et al. 2015) to hot Jupiters? What are the connections between hot Jupiters and warm Jupiters (Huang et al. 2016), hot Neptunes (Dong et al. 2018), compact multiple-planet systems (Lee & Chiang 2016), and ultra-short-period planets (Winn et al. 2018)? Answers to these questions may come more easily if we enlarge the sample of hot Jupiters around very bright stars, subject to a wide range of irradiation levels.

    HD202772 (TIC 290131778, TOI 123) was observed by Camera 1 of the TESS spacecraft during the first sector of science operations, between 2018 July 25 and 2018 August 22 (BJD 2458325 to 2458353).

    We will refer to the brighter target (hosting the planet) as HD202772A, and the fainter companion as HD202772B. Given the similarity between the two stars, and a projected separation of only ∼ 200AU, it seems very likely that the two stars are gravitationally bound.

    HD202772Ab is one of the largest known planets, with a relatively low mean density of 0.33 g cm−3. It is also one of the most strongly irradiated planets, thereby obeying the well known correlation between planetary radius and degree of irradiation (see, e.g., Laughlin et al. 2011; Lopez & Fortney 2016). Based on the irradiation of 4.7Χ109 erg s−1 cm−2, the estimated equilibrium temperature is about 2,100 K (see Table 4). The large size of HD202772Ab might be connected to the evolutionary state of the host star (Grunblatt et al. 2017). Fig. 8 shows the location of HD202772A in the space of surface gravity and effective temperature. HD202772Ais slightly evolved, with a relatively low surface gravity. As a star evolves, its luminosity increases, which also increases the flux of radiation impinging on any planets. If giant planets are “inflated” by intense stellar radiation, as has long been proposed, then the larger-than-usual size of HD202772Ab suggests that the evolutionary timescale of the star is slower than the inflationary timescale of the planet. HD202772A will exhaust its hydrogen fuel in ∼ 0.5Gyrs, which may have ramifications for the survival of the planet.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  22. 2018-Oct-05, 11:24 PM

  23. #1432
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    Is the exomoon of Kepler 1625 b in a habitable zone? What if the moon has moons, could those be habitable?

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.02712

    The habitable zone for Earthlike exomoons orbiting Kepler-1625b

    Duncan Forgan (Submitted on 4 Oct 2018)

    The recent announcement of a Neptune-sized exomoon candidate orbiting the Jupiter-sized object Kepler-1625b has forced us to rethink our assumptions regarding both exomoons and their host exoplanets. In this paper I describe calculations of the habitable zone for Earthlike exomoons in orbit of Kepler-1625b under a variety of assumptions. I find that the candidate exomoon, Kepler-1625b-i, does not currently reside within the exomoon habitable zone, but may have done so when Kepler-1625 occupied the main sequence. If it were to possess its own moon (a "moon-moon") that was Earthlike, this could potentially have been a habitable world. If other exomoons orbit Kepler-1625b, then there are a range of possible semimajor axes/eccentricities that would permit a habitable surface during the main sequence phase, while remaining dynamically stable under the perturbations of Kepler-1625b-i. This is however contingent on effective atmospheric CO2 regulation.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  24. #1433
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    I needed a happy paper about massive planetary bombardment to make the evening perfect. I have seen papers on the "Centaur threat" before, posted earlier in this long thread I believe. Great place to mine water, might be worth redirecting a small one inward.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.03209

    The threat of Centaurs for terrestrial planets and their orbital evolution as impactors

    M. A. Galiazzo, E. A. Silber, R. Dvorak (Submitted on 7 Oct 2018)

    Centaurs are solar system objects with orbits situated among the orbits of Jupiter and Neptune. Centaurs represent one of the sources of Near-Earth Objects. Thus, it is crucial to understand their orbital evolution which in some cases might end in collision with terrestrial planets and produce catastrophic events. We study the orbital evolution of the Centaurs toward the inner solar system, and estimate the number of close encounters and impacts with the terrestrial planets after the Late Heavy Bombardment assuming a steady state population of Centaurs. We also estimate the possible crater sizes. We compute the approximate amount of water released: on the Earth, which is about 0.00001 the total water present now. We also found sub-regions of the Centaurs where the possible impactors originate from. While crater sizes could extend up to hundreds of kilometers in diameter given the presently known population of Centaurs the majority of the craters would be less than about 10 km. For all the planets and an average impactor size of 12 km in diameter, the average impact frequency since the Late Heavy Bombardment is one every 1.9 Gyr for the Earth and 2.1 Gyr for Venus. For smaller bodies (e.g. > 1 km), the impact frequency is one every 14.4 Myr for the Earth, 13.1 Myr for Venus and, 46.3 for Mars, in the recent solar system. Only 53% of the Centaurs can enter into the terrestrial planet region and 7% can interact with terrestrial planets.

    ==========================

    Seems likely, but we've never seen them except for artificial submoons. Might be too complicated to bring about "naturally" in real life.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.03304

    Can Moons Have Moons?

    Juna A. Kollmeier, Sean N. Raymond (Submitted on 8 Oct 2018)

    Each of the giant planets within the Solar System has large moons but none of these moons have their own moons (which we call submoons). By analogy with studies of moons around short-period exoplanets, we investigate the dynamical stability of submoons. We find that 10 km-scale submoons can only survive around large (1000 km-scale) moons on wide-separation orbits. Tidal dissipation destabilizes the orbits of submoons around moons that are small or too close to their host planet; this is the case for most of the Solar System's moons. A handful of known moons are, however, capable of hosting long-lived submoons: Saturn's moons Titan and Iapetus, Jupiter's moon Callisto, and Earth's Moon. Based on its inferred mass and orbital separation, the newly-discovered exomoon candidate Kepler-1625b-I can, in principle, host submoons, although its large orbital inclination may pose a difficulty for dynamical stability. The existence, or lack thereof, of submoons, may yield important constraints on satellite formation and evolution in planetary systems.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  25. #1434
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    Did Ceres tip over on its side early in its existence?

    https://arstechnica.com/science/2018...onto-its-side/

    Surface features hint they might once have been equatorial but aren't now.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  26. #1435
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    Another runaway star, a big one, outbound from the Milky Way.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.04083

    A Runaway Giant in the Galactic Halo

    Philip Massey, et al. (Submitted on 9 Oct 2018)

    New evidence provided by the Gaia satellite places the location of the runaway star J01020100-7122208 in the halo of the Milky Way (MW) rather than in the Small Magellanic Cloud as previously thought. We conduct a reanalysis of the star's physical and kinematic properties, which indicates that the star may be an even more extraordinary find than previously reported. The star is a 180 Myr old 3-4 Mo G5-8 bright giant, with an effective temperature of 4800+/-100 K, a metallicity of {Fe/H]=-0.5, and a luminosity of log L/Lo=2.70+/-0.20 dex. A comparison with evolutionary tracks identifies the star as being in a giant or early asymptotic giant branch stage. The proper motion, combined with the previously known radial velocity, yields a total Galactocentric space velocity of 296 km/s. The star is currently located 6.4 kpc below the plane of the Milky Way, but our analysis of its orbit shows it passed through the disk ~25 Myr ago. The star's metallicity and age argue against it being native to the halo, and we suggest that the star was likely ejected from the disk. We discuss several ejection mechanisms, and conclude that the most likely scenario is ejection by the Milky Way's central black hole based upon our analysis of the star's orbit. The identification of the large radial velocity of J01020100-7122208 came about as a happenstance of it being seen in projection with the SMC, and we suggest that many similar objects may be revealed in Gaia data.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  27. #1436
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    I like how-to's and tutorials, even if I can't use them myself. Get a much better understanding of how astronomy today works.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.04175

    How to Characterize the Atmosphere of a Transiting Exoplanet

    Drake Deming, Dana Louie, Holly Sheets (Submitted on 9 Oct 2018)

    This tutorial is an introduction to techniques used to characterize the atmospheres of transiting exoplanets. We intend it to be a useful guide for the undergraduate, graduate student, or postdoctoral scholar who wants to begin research in this field, but who has no prior experience with transiting exoplanets. We begin with a discussion of the properties of exoplanetary systems that allow us to measure exoplanetary spectra, and the principles that underlie transit techniques. Subsequently, we discuss the most favorable wavelengths for observing, and explain the specific techniques of secondary eclipses and eclipse mapping, phase curves, transit spectroscopy, and convolution with spectral templates. Our discussion includes factors that affect the data acquisition, and also a separate discussion of how the results are interpreted. Other important topics that we cover include statistical methods to characterize atmospheres such as stacking, and the effects of stellar activity. We conclude by projecting the future utility of large-aperture observatories such as the James Webb Space Telescope and the forthcoming generation of extremely large ground-based telescopes.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  28. #1437
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    Dr. Stephen Hawking's last published paper. Good luck getting anywhere with it.


    https://www.newsweek.com/stephen-haw...-holes-1163571

    QUOTES: The study is incredibly complex. It deals with the idea that some information could survive being pulled into a black hole....

    Generally, it is thought nothing, not even light, can escape a black hole. All matter that reached the event horizon—the point of no return—would be sucked in leaving no trace behind. But Hawking and his colleagues refute this idea. They say information could be preserved at the “soft hairs” that hypothetically exist at the edge of a black hole.

    Presenting his research on black holes and soft hair in 2015, Hawking said: “I propose that the information is stored not in the interior of the black hole as one might expect, but on its boundary, the event horizon... The idea is the super translations are a hologram of the ingoing particles. Thus they contain all the information that would otherwise be lost ... The information about ingoing particles is returned, but in a chaotic and useless form. This resolves the information paradox. For all practical purposes, the information is lost."

    At the same conference, Hawking also said objects that fall into black holes could end up in another universe. "The existence of alternative histories with black holes suggests this might be possible. The hole would need to be large and if it was rotating it might have a passage to another universe. But you couldn't come back to our universe.

    "The message is ... black holes ain't as black as they are painted. They are not the eternal prisons they were once thought. Things can get out of a black hole both on the outside and possibly come out in another universe."

    ================

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.01847

    Black Hole Entropy and Soft Hair

    Sasha Haco, Stephen W. Hawking, Malcolm J. Perry, Andrew Strominger (Submitted on 3 Oct 2018 (v1), last revised 9 Oct 2018 (this version, v2))

    A set of infinitesimal Virasoro-L⊗ Virasoro-R diffeomorphisms are presented which act non-trivially on the horizon of a generic Kerr black hole with spin J. The covariant phase space formalism provides a formula for the Virasoro charges as surface integrals on the horizon. Integrability and associativity of the charge algebra are shown to require the inclusion of `Wald-Zoupas' counterterms. A counterterm satisfying the known consistency requirement is constructed and yields central charges cL = cR = 12J . Assuming the existence of a quantum Hilbert space on which these charges generate the symmetries, as well as the applicability of the Cardy formula, the central charges reproduce the macroscopic area-entropy law for generic Kerr black holes.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  29. #1438
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    A set of infinitesimal Virasoro-L⊗ Virasoro-R diffeomorphisms are presented which act non-trivially on the horizon of a generic Kerr black hole with spin J. The covariant phase space formalism provides a formula for the Virasoro charges as surface integrals on the horizon. Integrability and associativity of the charge algebra are shown to require the inclusion of `Wald-Zoupas' counterterms. A counterterm satisfying the known consistency requirement is constructed and yields central charges cL = cR = 12J . Assuming the existence of a quantum Hilbert space on which these charges generate the symmetries, as well as the applicability of the Cardy formula, the central charges reproduce the macroscopic area-entropy law for generic Kerr black holes.
    That's just what I was thinking!
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  30. #1439
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Assuming the existence of a quantum Hilbert space on which these charges generate the symmetries, as well as the applicability of the Cardy formula, the central charges reproduce the macroscopic area-entropy law for generic Kerr black holes.
    I thought it said "Candy formula." I will never be a cosmologist.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  31. #1440
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    I thought it said "Candy formula." I will never be a cosmologist.
    Sweet, sweet science.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

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