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Thread: Fun Papers In Arxiv

  1. #1441
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    As Frazier mentioned elsewhere on this forum, Ganymede appears to have gone through some serious moonquake time.


    http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018Icar..315...92C

    Morphological mapping of Ganymede: Investigating the role of strike-slip tectonics in the evolution of terrain types

    Cameron, Marissa E., et al.; Icarus, Volume 315, p. 92-114. (11/2018)

    The heavily fractured surface of Ganymede displays many morphologically distinctive regions of inferred distributed shear and strike-slip faulting that may be important to the structural development of its surface. To better understand the role of strike-slip tectonism in shaping this complex icy surface, we perform detailed mapping at nine sites using Galileo and Voyager imagery, noting key examples of strike-slip morphologies where present. These four morphological indicators are: en echelon structures, strike-slip duplexes, laterally offset pre-existing features, and possible strained craters. We map sites of both light, grooved terrain (Nun Sulci, Dardanus Sulcus, Tiamat Sulcus, Uruk Sulcus, and Arbela Sulcus), and terrains that are transitional from dark to light terrains (Nippur and Philus Sulci, Byblus Sulcus, Anshar Sulcus, and the Transitional Terrain of Northern Marius Regio). At least one, if not more, of the four strike-slip morphological indicators are observed at every site, suggesting strike-slip tectonism is indeed important to Ganymede's evolutionary history. Byblus Sulcus is the only mapped site where the presence of strike-slip indicators is limited to only a few en echelon structures; every other mapped site displays examples of at least two types, with Arbela Sulcus containing candidate examples of all four. In addition, quantification of morphological characteristics suggests related rotation between sites, as evidenced by the predominant NW/SE trend of mapped features within the light terrain present in five different sites (Nun, Tiamat, Uruk, Nippur/Philus, Byblus, and Anshar Sulcus). Moreover, incorporation of strike-slip tectonism with pre-existing observations of extensional behavior provides an improved, synoptic representation of Ganymede's tectonic history.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  2. #1442
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    Quite a bit in latest arXiv release. To begin with, how do you cause a 150 solar-mass star to become a runaway? The "bully binary" scenario herein is amazing, even if theoretical.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.05650

    Gaia and HST astrometry of the very massive ∼ 150 M⊙ candidate runaway star VFTS682

    M. Renzo, et al. (Submitted on 12 Oct 2018)

    How very massive stars form is still an open question in astrophysics. VFTS682 is among the most massive stars known, with an inferred initial mass of ∼ 150 M⊙. It is located in 30 Doradus at a projected distance of 29 pc from the central cluster R136. Its apparent isolation led to two hypotheses: either it formed in relative isolation or it was ejected dynamically from the cluster. We investigate the kinematics of VFTS682 as obtained by Gaia and Hubble Space Telescope astrometry. We derive a projected velocity relative to the cluster of 38 ± 17 km s−1 (1σ confidence interval). Although the error bars are substantial, two independent measures suggest that VFTS682 is a runaway ejected from the central cluster. This hypothesis is further supported by a variety of circumstantial clues. The central cluster is known to harbor other stars more massive than 150 M⊙ of similar spectral type and recent astrometric studies on VFTS16 and VFTS72 provide direct evidence that the cluster can eject some of its most massive members, in agreement with theoretical predictions. If future data confirm the runaway nature, this would make VFTS682 the most massive runaway star known to date.

    QUOTES: This star is located in the field of the 30 Doradus (30Dor) region in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and was studied as part of the multi-epoch spectroscopic VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey (VFTS, Evans et al. 2011). It is a hydrogen-rich Wolf-Rayet star of spectral type WNh5. Spectral analysis and comparison with evolutionary models lead to an inferred present-day mass of 137.8 +27.5.-15.9 M-sol corresponding to an initial mass of 150.0 +28.7/-17.4 M-sol (Schneider et al. 2018). This makes VFTS682 one of the most massive stars known and one of the most extreme objects in the region.

    ...Also Fujii & Portegies Zwart (2011) suggest that early in the evolution of a cluster, dynamical interactions form an extremely massive binary, which then tightens its orbit by ejecting other stars. The spectral similarities between VFTS682 and stars in the core of R136 are in agreement with this "bully binary" model. Interpreting the kinematics of VFTS682 through the lens of their simulations suggests the presence of a close binary with total mass M1+M2 > 300 M-sol in the core of the cluster. The difference between the cluster age and the kinematic age of VFTS682 puts an upper limit to the timescale to form the "bully binary" in R136 of ~1.3 Myr. Such a binary might be a candidate for a dynamically formed progenitor system of a binary black-hole, provided that stars this massive can avoid a pair-instability supernova...

    ==================

    48-paqe paper with a table of contents. Complete overview of where FRB astronomy is at present, with look at competing theories.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.05836

    A Living Theory Catalogue for Fast Radio Bursts

    E. Platts, et al. (Submitted on 13 Oct 2018)

    At present, we have almost as many theories to explain Fast Radio Bursts as we have Fast Radio Bursts observed. This landscape will be changing rapidly with CHIME/FRB, recently commissioned in Canada, and HIRAX, under construction in South Africa. This is an opportune time to review existing theories and their observational consequences, allowing us to efficiently curtail viable astrophysical models as more data becomes available. In this article we provide a currently up to date catalogue of the numerous and varied theories proposed for Fast Radio Bursts so far. We also launch an online evolving repository for the use and benefit of the community to dynamically update our theoretical knowledge and discuss constraints and uses of Fast Radio Bursts.

    ================

    For a short (6 page) paper, this has a lot of stuff going on in it. If you are into type Ia supernovae, this is for you.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.05910

    Thermonuclear Supernovae: Prospecting in the Age of Time-Domain and Multi-Wavelength Astronomy

    Peter Hoeflich, et al. (Submitted on 13 Oct 2018)

    We show how new and upcoming advances in the age of time-domain and multi-wavelength astronomy will open up a new venue to probe the diversity of SN~Ia. We discuss this in the context of the ELT (ESO), as well as space based instrument such as James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). As examples we demonstrate how the power of very early observations, within hours to days after the explosion, and very late-time observations, such as light curves and mid-infrared spectra beyond 3 years, can be used to probe the link to progenitors and explosion scenarios. We identify the electron-capture cross sections of Cr, Mn, and Ni/Co as one of the limiting factors we will face in the future.

    ====================

    Yet another broad overview paper on a narrow section of astronomy. Seems to touch on everything currently happening in radio-star observation, including a short look at the future. 30 pages.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1807.09798

    Radio Stars: from kHz to THz

    Lynn D. Matthews (MIT Haystack Observatory) (Submitted on 25 Jul 2018 (v1), last revised 12 Oct 2018 (this version, v2))

    Advances in technology and instrumentation have now opened up virtually the entire radio spectrum to the study of stars. An international workshop "Radio Stars: from kHz to THz" was held at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Haystack Observatory on 2017 November 1-3 to enable the discussion of progress in solar and stellar astrophysics enabled by radio wavelength observations. Topics covered included the Sun as a radio star, radio emission from hot and cool stars (from the pre- to post-main-sequence), ultracool dwarfs, stellar activity, stellar winds and mass loss, planetary nebulae, cataclysmic variables, classical novae, and the role of radio stars in understanding the Milky Way. This article summarizes meeting highlights along with some contextual background information.
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2018-Oct-16 at 03:08 PM.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
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  3. #1443
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    Two new articles on the messed-up surface of Europa...

    https://www.theatlantic.com/science/...l-life/572527/

    Jupiter’s Frozen Moon Is Studded With 50-Foot Blades of Ice

    =======================

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.05990

    Condition for the deflection of vertical cracks at dissimilar ice interfaces on Europa

    Daigo Shoji (Submitted on 14 Oct 2018)

    The surface of Europa contains many quasi-circular morphologies called lenticulae. Although the formation mechanism of lenticulae is not understood, sill intrusion from the subsurface ocean is one promising hypothesis. However, it remains unclear how vertical cracks from the ocean deflect horizontally to allow sill intrusion in Europa. In this study, the critical stress intensity factor of Europan ice required for deflection was evaluated by considering crack theory at the interface between dissimilar materials and experimental results on ice. For deflection to occur at the interface between two dissimilar ices, the ratio of the critical stress intensity factor of the interface to that of the upper layer should be at most 0.45--0.5. This critical ratio may be attained if the interface is caused by brine-containing ice with a volume fraction of >30 ppt (3%) and pure (no-brine) ice. Thus, a region with a temperature equal to the eutectic point (e.g., an area of approximately 240 K in the convective layer) is a candidate for the region in which the deflection occurs.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  4. #1444
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    Another article on RW Auriga appears on "page 36" of this topic, about the middle of the page. Fascinating to visualize this.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.06194

    The dimming of RW Auriga. Is dust accretion preceding an outburst?

    Matνas Gαrate, et al. (Submitted on 15 Oct 2018)

    RW Aur A has experienced various dimming events in the last years, decreasing its brightness by ∼2 mag for periods of months to years. Multiple observations indicate that a high concentration of dust grains, from the protoplanetary disk's inner regions, is blocking the starlight during these events. We propose a new mechanism that can send large amounts of dust close to the star on short timescales, through the reactivation of a dead zone in the protoplanetary disk. Using numerical simulations we model the accretion of gas and dust, along with the growth and fragmentation of particles in this scenario. We find that after the reactivation of the dead zone, the accumulated dust is rapidly accreted towards the star in around 15 years, at rates of Md = 10^−5 M⊙/yr and reaching dust-to-gas ratios of ϵ ≈ 5, preceding an increase in the gas accretion by a few years. This sudden rise of dust accretion can provide the material required for the dimmings, although the question of how to put the dust into the line of sight remains open to speculation.

    QUOTES: RW Aur A is a young star that in the last decade presented unusual variations in its luminosity. The star has about a solar mass, it is part of a binary system, and is surrounded by a protoplanetary disk showing signatures of tidal interaction (Cabrit et al. 2006; Rodriguez et al. 2018). The star had an almost constant luminosity for around a century, interrupted only by a few short and isolated dimmings (see Berdnikov et al. (2017) for a historical summary) until 2010, when its brightness suddenly dropped by 2 mag in the V band for 6 months (Rodriguez et al. 2013). Since 2010, a total of ve dimming events have been recorded (see Rodriguez et al. 2013, 2016; Petrov et al. 2015; Lamzin et al. 2017; Berdnikov et al. 2017, among others). The dimmings can last from a few months to two years, and reduce the brightness of the star up to 3 mag in the visual. Moreover, there is no obvious periodicity in their occurrence, and their origin is not yet clear...

    In this work we studied a new mechanism that can increase the concentration of solids in the inner regions of a protoplanetary disk in timescales of ~10 years, through the reactivation of a dead zone. This study was motivated by the recent dimmings of RW Aur A, which present a high concentration dust in the line of sight (Antipin et al. 2015; Schneider et al. 2015), and an increased emission from hot grains coming from the inner regions of the protoplanetary disk (Shenavrin et al. 2015), and subsequently observed super-solar metallicity of the accreted material(Gunther et al. 2018). Using 1D simulations to model the circumstellar disk of RW Aur A, we find that the dust grains accumulate at the inner edge of the dead zone, which acts as a dust trap, reaching concentrations of e ~ 0.25. When the turbulence in this region is reactivated, the excess of gas and dust is released from the dead zone and adverted towards the star.

    ===================

    Nice historical astronomy piece worth reading.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.06412

    Algol as Horus in the Cairo Calendar: the possible means and the motives of the observations

    Sebastian Porceddu, et al. (Submitted on 5 Oct 2018)

    An ancient Egyptian Calendar of Lucky and Unlucky Days, the Cairo Calendar (CC), assigns luck with the period of 2.850 days. Previous astronomical, astrophysical and statistical analyses of CC support the idea that this was the period of the eclipsing binary Algol three millennia ago. However, next to nothing is known about who recorded Algol's period into CC and especially how. Here, we show that the ancient Egyptian scribes had the possible means and the motives for such astronomical observations. Their principles of describing celestial phenomena as activity of gods reveal why Algol received the title of Horus.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  5. #1445
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    Good paper, great color simulation shots of crashing planets. Was there ever a "lost planet" that formed the asteroid belt? Nope. The process was more of building up than breaking down, but breaking down (Hit and Run Collisions) are pretty important. Ceres and Vesta escaped the big hits, it seems.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.05797

    Signatures of hit and run collisions

    Erik Asphaug (Submitted on 13 Oct 2018)

    Terrestrial planets grew in a series of similar-sized collisions that swept up most of the next-largest bodies. Theia was accreted by the Earth to form the Moon according to the theory. Planetesimals likewise may have finished their accretion in a sequence of 'junior giant impacts', scaled down in size and velocity. This chapter considers the complicated physics of pairwise accretion, as planetesimals grow to planetary scales, and considers how the inefficiency of that process influences the origin of planetesimals and the diversity of meteorites and primary asteroids.

    QUOTES: Hit and run was hiding inside the assumption of perfect merger, and its consequences were masquerading as ballistic disruption – a process that requires intense shocks even at modest scale, and appears impossible for planetesimals >100-200 km diameter. Planetesimals of any size are readily disrupted by HRC so long as there are larger bodies trying to accrete them. The statistical argument of attrition shows that HRCs may not only be common in the formation histories of planetesimals, but prevalent.

    Venus and Earth contain 92% of the inner solar system’s mass and are compositionally similar. The next-largest bodies, Mercury, the Moon and Mars, contain 8% and are famously diverse. Asteroids are even more diverse, and if primordial, require many distinct accretionary environments within a narrow region of the protoplanetary disk. HRC can create this compositional diversity when differentiated or partly differentiated bodies are dismantled by non-accretionary collisions: core goes one way, crust and mantle another, hydrosphere another. Some of these remnants attain dynamical separation, becoming surviving cores or orphans, retaining the isotopic signatures of M2 but having diverse bulk compositions. Generally the stripped materials orbit the Sun and mostly reaccrete onto M1, explaining, at least statistically, the missing mantle paradox and core-rich remnants. Every unaccreted planetesimal is unaccreted in its own way, increasing the diversity of leftovers. Most of the Nfinal in an accreting population end up surviving one or more HRCs, each outcome sensitive to the specific parameters of the collision. Some of the Nfinal are lucky to have never encountered a larger body, and the model predicts that a fraction of them (~Nfinal/N) are relatively primitive. The typical unaccreted object evolves to h~a=ln(N/Nfinal), consistent with the idea of multiple-HRC origins.

    In addition to causing global disruption and segregation, HRC can cause the thermodynamic transformation of the bulk of a planetesimal, even at scales and velocities where shocks are unimportant. Materials deep inside of growing planetesimals are unloaded from ~10-100 bars of hydrostatic pressure into clumps, sheets and dropletswarms, depending on pre-encounter composition and temperature, and impact parameters. Alteration and degassing are initiated as volatiles flow along new pressure gradients, as bodies are stripped abruptly of massive insulating crusts and are clumped into novel, smaller bodies. These possibilities, and the strong statistical bias towards HRC survivors, provide important context for the petrologic interpretation of meteorites.

    Vesta and Ceres appear to have avoided repeated HRCs with larger embryos, having retained their outermost layers (e.g. Clenet et al. 2014). Their silicate- and ice-rich compositions are inconsistent with them being the final feedstock of a lost Main Belt planet, because the prediction for strong accretionary attrition (a~4) would make them subject to repeated mantle stripping. A more consistent story is for Vesta and Ceres to be two of the largest planetesimals that accreted in the region, the last of ~100–1000 oligarchs that were mostly scattered. In that case, the remarkably diverse ~100–300 km asteroids and their meteorites are from the mantle-stripped interiors and orphaned mantles and crusts left over when a primary population of ~300–500 km bodies were mostly but not completely accreted to form the ~500–1000 km diameter largest Main Belt planetesimals.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  6. #1446
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    Traversable wormholes are speculative enough. But travelling through one without a causality paradox is even further into the realm of exotic, abstract physics. And if you move the ends of the tunnel together, you might go backwards and forwards in time.

    Now there's this: https://arxiv.org/abs/1206.5485

    Open timelike curves, a sort of solution to time paradoxes. It keeps the mouths of the wormholes from getting together, but it's maybe possibly not possible.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  7. #1447
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    Traversable wormholes are speculative enough. But travelling through one without a causality paradox is even further into the realm of exotic, abstract physics. And if you move the ends of the tunnel together, you might go backwards and forwards in time.

    Now there's this: https://arxiv.org/abs/1206.5485

    Open timelike curves, a sort of solution to time paradoxes. It keeps the mouths of the wormholes from getting together, but it's maybe possibly not possible.
    I'm stuck just at the idea of where to find a wormhole or how to create one. Went to arXiv and put in "2018 wormhole" to get current papers, ran away screaming. :0
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  8. #1448
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    Newly discovered planetary architecture in an infant protoplanetary disc screws up current thinking on how planets form.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1809.08147

    High resolution millimetre imaging of the CI Tau protoplanetary disc - a massive ensemble of protoplanets from 0.1 - 100 au

    Cathie J. Clarke, et al. (Submitted on 21 Sep 2018)

    We present high resolution millimeter continuum imaging of the disc surrounding the young star CI Tau, a system hosting the first hot Jupiter candidate in a protoplanetary disc system. The system has extended mm emission on which are superposed three prominent annular gaps at radii ~ 13, 39 and 100 au. We argue that these gaps are most likely to be generated by massive planets so that, including the hot Jupiter, the system contains four gas giant planets at an age of only 2 Myr. Two of the new planets are similarly located to those inferred in the famous HL Tau protoplanetary disc; in CI Tau, additional observational data enables a more complete analysis of the system properties than was possible for HL Tau. Our dust and gas dynamical modeling satisfies every available observational constraint and points to the most massive ensemble of exoplanets ever detected at this age, with its four planets spanning a factor 1000 in orbital radius. Our results show that the association between hot Jupiters and gas giants on wider orbits, observed in older stars, is apparently in place at an early evolutionary stage.

    QUOTES: With typical ages of up to several Gyr, most hot Jupiter hosts have long since lost their protoplanetary discs (typical lifetime of a few Myr; Haisch et al. (2001)); arguments about the origin of hot Jupiters are thus usually based on theoretical models linking hypothetical initial conditions to present day orbital parameters.

    The recent discovery (Johns-Krull et al. 2016; Biddle et al. 2018), using the radial velocity technique, of a hot Jupiter in the young disc bearing solar type star CI Tau, has demonstrated that in at least this case the hot Jupiter is already in a very close orbit when the star is only ~2 Myr old (Guilloteau et al. 2014). CI Tau is a well studied system, with mass 0.92 M-sun (Simon et al. 2017), luminosity 0.93 L-sun (Guilloteau et al. 2014), and is already known to host a massive dust and gas disc extending many hundreds of au from the star (Guilloteau et al. 2011; Andrews & Williams 2007); additionally it displays a high accretion rate of gas onto the star (McClure et al. 2013). The hot Jupiter’s mass is 11.3 M-Jupiter if its orbit is aligned with the outer disc (Guilloteau et al. 2014), consistent with the orbital alignment between hot Jupiters and outer planets found in mature exoplanetary systems (Becker et al. 2017). This mass places it in the top 5 % of the main sequence hot Jupiter population. Around half of mature hot Jupiter systems also contain companions (Knutson et al. 2014; Ngo et al. 2015) at less than 20 au which, if present at early times, would create structure in the protoplanetary disc. Although

    It is unclear whether the current planetary architecture would survive on Gyr timescales. The planets’ period ratios do not suggest a resonant configuration. Nevertheless, the relatively high disc mass means that they may still end up at small radii, possibly being swallowed by the star or ejected from the system by scattering off the hot Jupiter (Lega et al. 2013). While current imaging surveys of mature systems do not have the sensitivity to detect planets of the masses we infer in CI Tau (Vigan et al. 2017), future surveys will be able to determine if CI Tau-like systems are long lived.

    High resolution ALMA data of the disc in the young star CI Tau has revealed three prominent annular emission gaps which we have interpreted as an ensemble of massive planets spanning a factor thousand in orbital radius. The wealth of supplementary data available on CI Tau has allowed us to construct models that are consistent with all the data on this system available to date. The inferred planetary architecture suggests that the observed association between hot Jupiter and other companions may be in place at very early times. We note that the outer two planets (sub Jovian planets at radii of 43 and 108 au) present a challenge to current planet formation models.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  9. #1449
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    I'm stuck just at the idea of where to find a wormhole or how to create one. Went to arXiv and put in "2018 wormhole" to get current papers, ran away screaming. :0
    Well, that's a whole Noether story.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  10. #1450
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    Well, that's a whole Noether story.
    Ba-dum-BOMP.

    =============

    Need to brush up on your understanding of black holes in astronomy? Look no further. Large download but a great read.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.07032

    Fundamental Concepts [[book chapter]]

    Cosimo Bambi, Sourabh Nampalliwar (Submitted on 16 Oct 2018)

    This chapter briefly discusses the fundamental properties of black holes in general relativity, the discovery of astrophysical black holes and their main astronomical observations, how X-ray and γ-ray facilities can study these objects, and ends with a list of open problems and future developments in the field.

    Comments: 14 pages, 4 figures. To appear in "Tutorial Guide to X-ray and Gamma-ray Astronomy: Data Reduction and Analysis" (Ed. C. Bambi, Springer Singapore, expected in 2019). arXiv admin note: text overlap with arXiv:1711.10256

    QUOTES: Beginning with the special theory of relativity in 1905, Albert Einstein soon realized that Newton’s theory of gravity had to be superseded, to harmonize the equivalence principle and the special theory of relativity. After numerous insights, false alarms, and dead ends, the theory of general relativity was born in 1915. It took some years for it to take over Newton’s theory as the leading framework for the description of gravitational effects in our Universe, and over the past century, it has become one of the bedrocks of modern physics.

    Just a year after its proposition, Karl Schwarzschild was able to find an exact solution in general relativity, much to the surprise of Einstein himself, who only had approximate solutions by that time. The Schwarzschild solution turned out to be much more astrophysically relevant than anyone could have imagined, and describes the simplest class of black holes in Einstein’s theory.

    ===========

    This looked weird and it looked important. Readers can tell me if that hypothesis is correct.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1804.10274

    Lack of time dilation in type Ia supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    David F. Crawford (Submitted on 22 Mar 2018 (v1), last revised 15 Oct 2018 (this version, v3))

    A fundamental property of an expanding universe is that any time interval of the characteristics of distant objects must appear to scale by the factor (1+z ). This is called time-dilation. Light curves of type Ia supernovae and the duration of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB) are the only observations that can directly measure time-dilation over a wide range of redshifts. An analysis of raw observations of 2,133 type Ia supernovae light-curves shows that their widths are proportional to (1+z) (−0.038±0.075) which is consistent with no time-dilation and inconsistent with standard time-dilation. Analysis of the duration of GRB shows that they are consistent with no time-dilation and have very little support for standard time-dilation. In addition, it is shown that the standard method for calibrating the type Ia supernovae light-curves (SALT2) is flawed, which explains why this lack of time-dilation has not been previously observed.
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2018-Oct-17 at 02:29 PM.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  11. #1451
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    I beg the board's indulgence in posting this with a long quote (explains everything), as I have never heard of such a thing as a "changing look quasar" before. That is some major space bizarreness, dramatic and startling.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.06616

    The Changing-Look Quasar Mrk 590 is Awakening

    S. Mathur, et al. (Submitted on 15 Oct 2018)

    Mrk 590 was originally classified as a Seyfert 1 galaxy, but then it underwent dramatic changes: the nuclear luminosity dropped by over two orders of magnitude and the broad emission lines all but disappeared from the optical spectrum. Here we present followup observations to the original discovery and characterization of this "changing look" active galactic nucleus (AGN). The new Chandra and HST observations from 2014 show that Mrk 590 is awakening, changing its appearance again. While the source continues to be in a low state, its soft excess has re-emerged, though not to the previous level. The UV continuum is brighter by more than a factor of two and the broad MgII emission line is present, indicating that the ionizing continuum is also brightening. These observations suggest that the soft excess is not due to reprocessed hard X-ray emission. Instead, it is connected to the UV continuum through warm Comptonization. Variability of the Fe K-alpha emission lines suggests that the reprocessing region is within about 10 light years or 3 pc of the central source. The AGN type change is neither due to obscuration, nor due to one-way evolution from type-1 to type-2, as suggested in literature, but may be related to episodic accretion events.

    QUOTE (INTRO ONLY): Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are characterized by continuum emission across the electromagnetic spectrum and strong emission lines in the UV, optical and NIR. AGNs with both broad and narrow emission lines are classified as “Type 1” and those with only narrow emission lines are “Type 2”, and this difference is usually attributed to our viewing angle relative to an obscuring midplane. AGNs are also known to be variable sources, showing continuum as well as emission line variability. The continuum variability is observed on both short and long time scales, but the variability amplitude is usually small, of the order of ~20% over a year for low luminosity AGNs (i.e. with Seyfert-like luminosity of about 1041 to 1044 erg s−1). The emission line variations usually track the continuum variations, but see Goad et al. (2016).

    A special class of AGN that has recently been gaining recognition has been termed “changing-look quasars”. Their broad emission lines are observed to appear or disappear together with large changes in continuum luminosity. The changes in the emission line spectra are such that they change type, e.g. from “type 1” to “type 2”, and this is clearly an intrinsic change, implying “type” is not always associated with viewing angle. This phenomenon has become of recent interest due to a combination of several serendipitous discoveries of changing-look AGNs (e.g. Shappee et al. 2014, Denney et al. 2014, Lamassa et al. 2015) and the growing availability of large spectroscopic quasar databases with long time-baselines of multi-epoch photometry and spectroscopy. These rare occurrences have the potential to contribute to our limited understanding of the central engines of active galaxies. Systematic searches of databases such as the SDSS/BOSS/TDSS have begun to uncover more changing look quasars at larger redshifts and led to predictions of the possible occurrence rates for quasars to change type (Runnoe et al. 2016, MacLeod et al. 2016).

    Changing-look quasars are of particular interest for their potential to shed light on the physical origin of quasar variability and the details of accretion, since they have undergone such an extreme apparent change. Additionally, what is the role these objects play in the black hole (BH) accretion history — are we observing the beginning/end of a quasar phase? What role do these objects play in the larger context of galaxy and BH co-evolution? Recent investigations of changing-look quasars have tried to use the observations before and after the change and any additional data available on the few known sources to test whether or not the changes are due to changes in accretion rate or obscuration, and to determine if the quasar is turning on for the first time, reviving after a period of quiescence, or something else. In all cases so far, obscuration has not been identified as the major cause of changing look. Instead, a significant increase (decrease) in the mass accretion rate is the most favored explanation for the appearance (disappearance) of the broad emission lines.

    The nearby, low-luminosity AGN Markarian 590 (Mrk 590 here onwards) remains an interesting case of a changing-look quasar in the local universe. Denney et al. (2014; D14 hereafter) have described the initial set of observations that catalog this object’s observed history and “change”, where it went from being a strong broad-line emitter three decades ago, allowing a reverberation mapping-based direct BH mass measurements to be made ((4.75± 0.74)Χ107M⊙, Peterson et al. 2004) to being broad-line weak — the optical broad lines all but disappeared — in the past decade. Mrk 590 also shows the presence of ultra-fast outflows in the X-ray band (Gupta, Mathur & Krongold 2015). We have obtained additional UV and X-ray spectra since those presented by D14 that we describe in sections 2 and 3. Implications of our results are discussed in section 4 and we show that the “soft X-ray excess”, observed in a large fraction of AGNs, is not due to the reprocessing of hard X-ray continuum, but is instead a result of thermal Comptonization of UV photons. We also argue that the changing look phenomenon is a normal event in the duty cycle of “normal” quasars.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  12. #1452
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    You see a transiting planet, but its transits are irregular. An unseen planet is affecting the motion of the seen one. How do you nail down the parameters of the unseen planet? With TTVs.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.06769

    An alternative stable solution for the Kepler-419 system, obtained with the use of a genetic algorithm

    D. D. Carpintero, M. D. Melita (Submitted on 16 Oct 2018)

    The mid-transit times of an exoplanet may be non-periodic. The variations in the timing of the transits with respect to a single period, that is, the transit timing variations (TTVs), can sometimes be attributed to perturbations by other exoplanets present in the system, which may or may not transit the star. Our aim is to compute the mass and the six orbital elements of an non-transiting exoplanet, given only the central times of transit of the transiting body. We also aim to recover the mass of the star and the mass and orbital elements of the transiting exoplanet, suitably modified in order to decrease the deviation between the observed and the computed transit times by as much as possible. We have applied our method, based on a genetic algorithm, to the Kepler-419 system. We were able to compute all fourteen free parameters of the system, which, when integrated in time, give transits within the observational errors. We also studied the dynamics and the long-term orbital evolution of the Kepler-419 planetary system as defined by the orbital elements computed by us, in order to determine its stability.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  13. #1453
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    A visit with an old and much loved friend... Tunguska!


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.07427

    The Tunguska Event Revisited

    L. Foschini, et al. (Submitted on 17 Oct 2018)

    The 1908 Tunguska Event is one of the best studied cases of a cosmic body impacting the Earth with global effects. However, still today, significant doubts are casted on the different proposed event reconstructions. In the present work, we would like to revisit the atmospheric fragmentation of the Tunguska Cosmic Body (TCB) by taking into account the possibility that a metre-sized fragment caused the formation of the Lake Cheko, located at about 9km NW the epicentre. Our work favours the hypothesis that the TCB was a rubble-pile asteroid composed by boulders with very different materials with different mechanical strengths, density, and porosity. The TCB was divided at least into two pieces by a close encounter with the Earth, short before the impact with our Planet: the main body (60m) produced the well-known airburst that devastated more than 2000km^2 of Siberian taig\`a, while the secondary one (6-10m) fell without fragmentation in the Kimchu river region and excavated a 50m depression, which presently hosts the Lake Cheko. This hypothesis requires that the secondary body was an extremely compact stone with high mechanical strength (300MPa). It is a high, but not unrealistic, value, as shown by a similar case that occurred in 2007 near the village of Carancas (Peru). An extreme compactness is not necessary, if one considers that the crater excavation could be enhanced by the explosion of permafrost-trapped methane released and ignited during the impact process. In this case, a smaller fragment (2m) with an average mechanical strength could reach the ground without fragmentation and is sufficient to excavate the Lake Cheko. We exclude the hypothesis of a single cosmic body ejecting a metre-sized fragment during or shortly before the airburst, because the resulting lateral velocity of such a large boulder was not enough to deviate to reach the alleged impact site.

    QUOTES: We revisited the Tunguska event of June 30th, 1908, by taking into account the possibility that one metre-sized fragment impacted the ground forming the Lake Cheko depression. Our work favours the hypothesis that the TCB was a rubble-pile asteroid composed of very different materials with different strengths, density, and porosity (as, for example, the asteroid Itokawa, Lowry et al. 2014; Miyamoto et al. 2007 or 2008 TC3 Almahata Sitta, Bischoff et al. 2010). The TCB was divided at least into two pieces by a close encounter with the Earth, short before the impact with our planet. The largest boulder (∼ 60 m diameter) produced the well-known airburst that devastated the Siberian taiga, while the smaller fragment (6−10 m diameter) continued without fragmentation toward the Kimchu river region and excavated the Lake Cheko. Multiple centres of explosions inferred from the analysis of fallen trees (e.g. Serra et al. 1994; Longo et al. 2005) could be due to subsequent breakup of the main body, which ended in a complete vaporisation. To reach the Kimchu river region without fragmentation, the secondary body was an extremely compact stone, with high mechanical strength (∼ 300 MPa). This is a high value, but not unrealistic, as shown by the 2007 Carancas meteorite case (Tancredi et al., 2009). Another possibility to bypass the extreme compactness is to assume that the thawing of the permafrost released methane, which in turn exploded because of the high temperatures, thus enlarging the original crater (Gasperini et al., 2007; Longo et al., 2011). In this case, a 2−m diameter boulder has an average mechanical strength and could reach the ground without fragmentation. We exclude the hypothesis of a single TCB body, which ejected one metre-sized fragment during or shortly before the airburst: the lateral velocity for a metre-size boulder is not enough to deviate to reach the Kimchu river. Only centimetre-size fragment could have a ∼ 33◦ deviation necessary to reach the Kimchu river region.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  14. #1454
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    The discovery of two more super-Earths in the immediate solar neighborhood has big implications. Do super-Earths around M-type stars prevent the formation of other planets around their suns? My own thought is, we'd better hope these single-planet systems have a lot of satellites if we are thinking of colonizing or visiting them.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.07572

    The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs: The warm super-Earths in twin orbits around the mid-type M dwarfs Ross 1020 (GJ 3779) and LP 819-052 (GJ 1265)

    R. Luque, et al. (Submitted on 17 Oct 2018)

    We announce the discovery of two planetary companions orbiting around the low mass stars Ross 1020 (GJ 3779, M4.0V) and LP 819-052 (GJ 1265, M4.5V). The discovery is based on the analysis of CARMENES radial velocity observations in the visual channel as part of its survey for exoplanets around M dwarfs. In the case of GJ 1265, CARMENES observations were complemented with publicly available Doppler measurements from HARPS. The datasets reveal one planetary companion for each star that share very similar properties: minimum masses of 8.0 ± 0.5 M⊕ and 7.4 ± 0.5 M⊕ in low-eccentricity orbits with periods of 3.023 ± 0.001 d and 3.651 ± 0.001 d for GJ 3779 b and GJ 1265 b, respectively. The periodic signals around three days found in the radial velocity data have no counterpart in any spectral activity indicator. Besides, we collected available photometric data for the two host stars, which confirm that the additional Doppler variations found at periods around 95 d can be attributed to the rotation of the stars. The addition of these planets in a mass-period diagram of known planets around M dwarfs suggests a bimodal distribution with a lack of short-period low-mass planets in the range of 2-5 M⊕. It also indicates that super-Earths (> 5 M⊕) currently detected by radial velocity and transit techniques around M stars are usually found in systems dominated by a single planet.

    QUOTES: The star GJ 3779 (Ross 1020, J13229+244) is a high proper motion star classified as M4.0 V by Hawley et al. (1996). It resides in the Coma Berenices constellation, located at a distance of d = 13.748 ± 0.011 pc (Gaia Collaboration et al. 2018) with an apparent magnitude in the J band of 8.728 mag (Skrutskie et al. 2006). Using CARMENES data, Reiners et al. (2018b) determined its absolute radial velocity to be Vr = -19:361 km s-1 and a Doppler broadening upper-limit of v sin i < 2 km s-1. GJ 1265 (LP 819-052, J22137-176) is also a high proper motion star at a distance of d = 10.255 ± 0.007 pc (Gaia Collaboration et al. 2018) in the Aquarius constellation. Its apparent magnitude in the J band is 8.955 mag (Skrutskie et al. 2006), and it is approaching the Solar System with an absolute radial velocity of Vr = -24.297 km s-1 (Reiners et al. 2018b). The star exhibits a luminosity in X-rays of log LX = 26.1 ± 0.2 erg s-1, measured with the XMM-Newton observatory (Rosen et al. 2016). Therefore, we can estimate the rotational period of the star to be of the order of 100 d following the LX–Prot relation proposed by Reiners et al. (2014).

    The results from the radial velocity analysis reveal two very similar planets orbiting very similar M dwarfs. Not only do the stars exhibit comparable photospheric and physical parameters, but also long rotational periods. Mid-type slow-rotators are considered to be less magnetically active than their late-type or rapid rotator counterparts (West et al. 2015), which agrees with the absence of periodic signals in the photospheric spectral indicators (Figs. 2 and 5). The planetary candidates are both orbiting at a semi-major axes of 0.026 au with periods of the order of 3d and super-Earth-like minimum masses of 7–8 M⊕. The MCMC analyses reveal that the derived eccentricities of GJ 3779 b and GJ 1265 b are compatible with circular orbits, which is predicted by orbital evolution models for such short-period planets.

    It is also noticeable how short-period Earth-like planets in the range of 0.5–2 M⊕ have been mostly found in multiple systems (triangle symbols), while in the range of 5–8 M⊕, eight out of ten planets have not been found to have further planetary companions. Also striking is the lack of planets in the range of 2–5 M⊕ with orbital periods shorter than 10 d around mid- and late type M stars. This raises questions about their formation process. Is it possible that super-Earth planets around M dwarfs prevent the formation of smaller counterparts, or are they formed by aggregation of smaller, Earth-size planets? Is it dependent on the mass of the host star?
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; Yesterday at 02:04 PM.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  15. #1455
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    Hypothesis that a supernova at the end of the Pliocene contributed to a mass extinction at the time. Revision of an earlier article.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1712.09367

    Muon Radiation Dose and Marine Megafaunal Extinction at the end-Pliocene Supernova

    Adrian L. Melott (Kansas), Franciole Marinho, Laura Paulucci (Submitted on 26 Dec 2017 (v1), last revised 17 Oct 2018 (this version, v2))

    Considerable data and analysis support the detection of one or more supernovae at a distance of about 50 pc, ~2.6 million years ago. This is possibly related to the extinction event around that time and is a member of a series of explosions which formed the Local Bubble in the interstellar medium. We build on previous work, and propagate the muon flux from supernova-initiated cosmic rays from the surface to the depths of the ocean. We find that the radiation dose from the muons will exceed the total present surface dose from all sources at depths up to a kilometer and will persist for at least the lifetime of marine megafauna. It is reasonable to hypothesize that this increase in radiation load may have contributed to a newly documented marine megafaunal extinction at that time.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  16. #1456
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    A rare circumstance in which a head-on collision makes you prettier.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.07779

    The origin of galactic metal-rich stellar halo components with highly eccentric orbits

    Azadeh Fattahi, et al. (Submitted on 17 Oct 2018)

    Using the astrometry from the ESA's Gaia mission, previous works have shown that the Milky Way stellar halo is dominated by metal-rich stars on highly eccentric orbits. To shed light on the nature of this prominent halo component, we have analysed 28 Galaxy analogues in the Auriga suite of cosmological hydrodynamics zoom-in simulations. Some three quarters of the Auriga galaxies contain significant components with high radial velocity anisotropy, beta > 0.6. However, only in one third of the hosts do the high-beta stars contribute significantly to the accreted stellar halo overall, similar to what is observed in the Milky Way. For this particular subset we reveal the origin of the dominant stellar halo component with high metallicity, [Fe/H]~-1, and high orbital anisotropy, beta>0.8, by tracing their stars back to the epoch of accretion. It appears that, typically, these stars come from a single dwarf galaxy with a stellar mass of order of 10^9-10^10 Msol that merged around 6-10 Gyr ago, causing a sharp increase in the halo mass. Our study therefore establishes a firm link between the excess of radially anisotropic stellar debris in the Milky Way halo and an ancient head-on collision between the young Milky Way and a massive dwarf galaxy.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

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