Page 51 of 52 FirstFirst ... 4149505152 LastLast
Results 1,501 to 1,530 of 1532

Thread: Fun Papers In Arxiv

  1. #1501
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,808
    Could Triton have a subsurface ocean? That is a darn cold moon!


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.11257

    Compaction and Melt Transport in Ammonia-Rich Ice Shells: Implications for the Evolution of Triton

    Noah P. Hammond, Marc Parmentier, Amy C. Barr (Submitted on 27 Nov 2018)

    Ammonia, if present in the ice shells of icy satellites, could lower the temperature for the onset of melting to 176 K and create a large temperature range where partial melt is thermally stable. The evolution of regions of ammonia-rich partial melt could strongly influence the geological and thermal evolution of icy bodies. For melt to be extracted from partially molten regions, the surrounding solid matrix must deform and compact. Whether ammonia-rich melts sink to the subsurface ocean or become frozen into the ice shell depends on the compaction rate and thermal evolution. Here we construct a model for the compaction and thermal evolution of a partially molten, ammonia-rich ice shell in a one-dimensional geometry. We model the thickening of an initially thin ice shell above an ocean with 10% ammonia. We find that ammonia-rich melts can freeze into the upper 5 to 10 kilometers of the ice shell, when ice shell thickening is rapid compared to the compaction rate. The trapping of near-surface volatiles suggests that, upon reheating of the ice shell, eutectic melting events are possible. However, as the ice shell thickening rate decreases, ammonia-rich melt is efficiently excluded from the ice shell and the bulk of the ice shell is pure water ice. We apply our results to the thermal evolution of Neptune's moon Triton. As Triton's ice shell thickens, the gradual increase of ammonia concentration in Triton's subsurface ocean helps to prevent freezing and increases the predicted final ocean thickness by up to 50 km.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  2. #1502
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,808
    Great color image! Worthwhile paper on exactly what the title says.


    https://phys.org/news/2018-11-saturn-belts.html

    A new way to create Saturn's radiation belts

    November 29, 2018, British Antarctic Survey

    A team of international scientists from BAS, University of Iowa and GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences has discovered a new method to explain how radiation belts are formed around the planet Saturn.

    Around Saturn, and other planets including the Earth, energetic charged particles are trapped in the magnetic field. Here they form doughnut-shaped zones near the planet, known as radiation belts, such as the Van Allen belts around the Earth where electrons travel close to the speed of light.

    Data collected by the NASA Cassini spacecraft, which orbited Saturn for 13 years, combined with a BAS computer model have provided new insights into the behaviour of these rapidly-moving electrons. The discovery overturns the accepted view among space scientists about the mechanisms responsible for accelerating the electrons to such extreme energies in Saturn's radiation belts. The team's results are published in the journal Nature Communications this week (Thursday 29 November).

    ===================

    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-07549-4

    Formation of electron radiation belts at Saturn by Z-mode wave acceleration
    E. E. Woodfield, et al., Nature Communications, volume 9, Article number: 5062 (2018)
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  3. #1503
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,633
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    This one's new to me. At least no one is claiming it's Sodom.


    https://www.livescience.com/64179-an...ddle-east.html

    Cosmic Airburst May Have Wiped Out Part of the Middle East 3,700 Years Ago
    By Owen Jarus, Live Science Contributor | November 28, 2018 06:32am ET

    Some 3,700 years ago, a meteor or comet exploded over the Middle East, wiping out human life across a swath of land called Middle Ghor, north of the Dead Sea, say archaeologists who have found evidence of the cosmic airburst.

    The airburst "in an instant, devastated approximately 500 km2 [about 200 square miles] immediately north of the Dead Sea, not only wiping out 100 percent of the [cities] and towns, but also stripping agricultural soils from once-fertile fields and covering the eastern Middle Ghor with a super-heated brine of Dead Sea anhydride salts pushed over the landscape by the event's frontal shock waves," the researchers wrote in the abstract for a paper that was presented at the American Schools of Oriental Research annual meeting held in Denver Nov. 14 to 17. Anhydride salts are a mix of salt and sulfates.

    "Based upon the archaeological evidence, it took at least 600 years to recover sufficiently from the soil destruction and contamination before civilization could again become established in the eastern Middle Ghor," they wrote. Among the places destroyed was Tall el-Hammam, an ancient city that covered 89 acres (36 hectares) of land.
    You were too optimistic it seems:-
    https://www.news.com.au/technology/s...706acd2afab9e2

    Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk

  4. #1504
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,808
    Have we detected large exocomets?


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.12414

    The Little Dippers: Transits of Star-grazing Exocomets?

    Megan Ansdell, et al. (Submitted on 29 Nov 2018)

    We describe EPIC 205718330 and EPIC 235240266, two systems identified in the K2 data whose light curves contain episodic drops in brightness with shapes and durations similar to those of the young "dipper" stars, yet shallower by ~1-2 orders of magnitude. These "little dippers" have diverse profile shapes with durations of ~0.5-1.0 days and depths of ~0.1-1.0% in flux; however, unlike most of the young dipper stars, these do not exhibit any detectable infrared excess indicative of protoplanetary disks, and our ground-based follow-up spectra lack any signatures of youth while indicating these objects as kinematically old. After ruling out instrumental and/or data processing artifacts as sources of the dimming events, we investigate possible astrophysical mechanisms based on the light curve and stellar properties. We argue that the little dippers are consistent with transits of star-grazing exocomets, and speculate that they are signposts of massive non-transiting exoplanets driving the close-approach orbits.

    ==========

    Crashing planets into each other, with a possible example.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.11778

    Atmospheric Mass Loss from High Velocity Giant Impacts

    Almog Yalinewich, Hilke E. Schlichting (Submitted on 28 Nov 2018)

    Using moving mesh hydrodynamic simulations, we determine the shock propagation and resulting ground velocities for a planet hit by a high velocity impactor. We use our results to determine the atmospheric mass loss caused by the resulting ground motion due to the impact shock wave. We find that there are two distinct shock propagation regimes: In the limit in which the impactor is significantly smaller than the target (R i <<R t ), the solutions are self-similar and the shock velocity at a fixed point on the target scale as m 2/3 i , where m i is the mass of the impactor, and the ground velocities follow a universal profile given by v g /v i =(14.2x 2 −25.3x+11.3)/(x 2 −2.5x+1.9)+2lnR i /R t , where x=sin(θ/2) , θ is the latitude on the target measured from the impact site, and v g and v i are the ground velocity and impact velocity, respectively. In addition, we find that shock velocities decline with the mass of the impactor significantly more weakly than m 2/3 i in the limit in which the impactor is comparable to the size of the target (Ri ∼ Rt). This weaker decline is due to the fact that the shock hardly decelerates when the mass swept up by the shock is comparable to the mass of the impactor and that, in the large impactor regime, the rarefaction wave is not able to catch up with the forward shock such that the mass contained in the shock front is - analogous to Newton's cradle - simply the impactor mass. We use the resulting surface velocity profiles to calculate the atmospheric mass loss for a large range of impactor masses and impact velocities and apply them to the Kepler-36 system and the Moon forming impact. Finally, we present and generalise our results in terms of the v g /v i and the impactor to target size ratio (R i /R t ) such that they can easily be applied to other collision scenarios.

    QUOTES: Several planets residing in multiple-planet systems show surprising diversity in their bulk densities which is hard to explain from gas accretion and subsequent thermal evolution and loss alone (e.g Schlichting 2018). One such system is Kepler-36 which hosts two planets comparable in mass on adjacent orbits (P=13.8 and 16.2 days) (Carter et al. 2012). The planets are so close, in fact, that they are in a 29:34 resonance (Deck et al. 2012). Kepler 36b has a mass of about 4 M-Earth and a radius of about 1.5 R-Earth, which is consistent with an Earth-like composition. In contrast, its neighbour Kepler 36c has a mass 8 M-Earth and radius 3.7 R-Earth, which is consistent with an extended H/He envelope (Lopez & Fortney 2013). Planet formation scenarios predict that Kepler 36b should also have formed with an extended H/He atmosphere (e.g. Ginzburg et al. 2015). One possible explanation for the lack of an extended H/He atmosphere for Kepler 36b is that it was lost in a giant impact (Liu et al. 2015; Inamdar & Schlichting 2015).
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  5. #1505
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,808
    Curious if this "temperate" giant planet might have moons that could be habitable.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.09580

    SOPHIE velocimetry of Kepler transit candidates. XIX. The transiting temperate giant planet KOI-3680b

    G. Hebrard, et al. (Submitted on 23 Nov 2018 (v1), last revised 29 Nov 2018 (this version, v2))

    Whereas thousands of transiting giant exoplanets are known today, only a few are well characterized with long orbital periods. Here we present KOI-3680b, a new planet in this category. First identified by the Kepler team as a promising candidate from the photometry of the Kepler spacecraft, we establish here its planetary nature from the radial velocity follow-up secured over two years with the SOPHIE spectrograph at Observatoire de Haute-Provence, France. The combined analysis of the whole dataset allows us to fully characterize this new planetary system. KOI-3680b has an orbital period of 141.2417 +/- 0.0001 days, a mass of 1.93 +/- 0.20 M_Jup, and a radius of 0.99 +/- 0.07 R_Jup. It exhibits a highly eccentric orbit (e = 0.50 +/- 0.03) around an early G dwarf. KOI-3680b is the transiting giant planet with the longest period characterized so far around a single star; it offers opportunities to extend studies which were mainly devoted to exoplanets close to their host stars, and to compare both exoplanet populations.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  6. #1506
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,808
    revised version of a paper about possible die-off on Earth from an end-Pliocene supernova creating a muon rain.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1712.09367

    Muon Radiation Dose and Marine Megafaunal Extinction at the end-Pliocene Supernova

    Adrian L. Melott (Kansas), Franciole Marinho, Laura Paulucci (Submitted on 26 Dec 2017 (v1), last revised 17 Oct 2018 (this version, v2))

    Considerable data and analysis support the detection of one or more supernovae at a distance of about 50 pc, ~2.6 million years ago. This is possibly related to the extinction event around that time and is a member of a series of explosions which formed the Local Bubble in the interstellar medium. We build on previous work, and propagate the muon flux from supernova-initiated cosmic rays from the surface to the depths of the ocean. We find that the radiation dose from the muons will exceed the total present surface dose from all sources at depths up to a kilometer and will persist for at least the lifetime of marine megafauna. It is reasonable to hypothesize that this increase in radiation load may have contributed to a newly documented marine megafaunal extinction at that time.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  7. #1507
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,808
    Maybe we are lucky to have seen Saturn's rings, given the timing.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1709.08768

    A recent origin for Saturn's rings from the collisional disruption of an icy moon

    John Dubinski (Submitted on 26 Sep 2017 (v1), last revised 30 Nov 2018 (this version, v2))

    The disruption of an icy moon in a collision with an interloping comet a few hundred million years ago is a simple way to create Saturn's rings. A ring parent moon with a mass comparable to Mimas could be trapped in mean motion resonance with Enceladus and Dione in an orbit near the current outer edge of the rings just beyond the Roche zone. I present collisional N-body simulations of cometary impacts that lead to the partial disruption of a differentiated moon with a rocky core and icy mantle. The core can survive largely intact while the debris from the mantle settles into a ring of predominantly ice particles straddling the orbital radius of the parent moon. The nascent ring spreads radially due to collisional viscosity while mass re-accretes onto the remnant rocky core to form a new moon that can be identified as Mimas. The icy debris that migrates into the Roche zone evolves into Saturn's ring system. Torques from tidal interaction with Saturn and resonant interactions with the rings push the recently formed Mimas outward to its current position on the same timescale of a few hundred million years. This scenario accounts for the high ice fraction observed in Saturn's rings and explains why the ring mass is comparable to the mass of Mimas. The prior existence of a ring parent moon in mean motion resonance results in a tidal heating rate for Enceladus in the recent past that is significantly larger than the current rate.

    ================

    Revised version of the Antlia 2 "giant dwarf" galaxy discovery paper


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.04082

    The hidden giant: discovery of an enormous Galactic dwarf satellite in Gaia DR2

    G. Torrealba, et al. (Submitted on 9 Nov 2018 (v1), last revised 3 Dec 2018 (this version, v2))

    We report the discovery of a Milky-Way satellite in the constellation of Antlia. The Antlia 2 dwarf galaxy is located behind the Galactic disc at a latitude of b∼11 ∘ and spans 1.26 degrees, which corresponds to ∼2.9 kpc at its distance of 130 kpc. While similar in extent to the Large Magellanic Cloud, Antlia~2 is orders of magnitude fainter with M V =−8.5 mag, making it by far the lowest surface brightness system known (at 32.3 mag/arcsec 2 ), ∼100 times more diffuse than the so-called ultra diffuse galaxies. The satellite was identified using a combination of astrometry, photometry and variability data from Gaia Data Release 2, and its nature confirmed with deep archival DECam imaging, which revealed a conspicuous BHB signal. We have also obtained follow-up spectroscopy using AAOmega on the AAT to measure the dwarf's systemic velocity, 290.9±0.5 km/s, its velocity dispersion, 5.7±1.1 km/s, and mean metallicity, [Fe/H]=−1.4 . From these properties we conclude that Antlia~2 inhabits one of the least dense Dark Matter (DM) halos probed to date. Dynamical modelling and tidal-disruption simulations suggest that a combination of a cored DM profile and strong tidal stripping may explain the observed properties of this satellite. The origin of this core may be consistent with aggressive feedback, or may even require alternatives to cold dark matter (such as ultra-light bosons).
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  8. #1508
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,808
    Used to be we had to explain why other solar systems came out so strangely. Turns out the strange solar system was ours.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1812.01033

    Solar System Formation in the Context of Extra-Solar Planets

    Sean N. Raymond, Andre Izidoro, Alessandro Morbidelli (Submitted on 3 Dec 2018)

    Exoplanet surveys have confirmed one of humanity's (and all teenagers') worst fears: we are weird. If our Solar System were observed with present-day Earth technology -- to put our system and exoplanets on the same footing -- Jupiter is the only planet that would be detectable. The statistics of exo-Jupiters indicate that the Solar System is unusual at the ~1% level among Sun-like stars (or ~0.1% among all stars). But why are we different? Successful formation models for both the Solar System and exoplanet systems rely on two key processes: orbital migration and dynamical instability. Systems of close-in super-Earths or sub-Neptunes require substantial radial inward motion of solids either as drifting mm- to cm-sized pebbles or migrating Earth-mass or larger planetary embryos. We argue that, regardless of their formation mode, the late evolution of super-Earth systems involves migration into chains of mean motion resonances, generally followed by instability when the disk dissipates. This pattern is likely also ubiquitous in giant planet systems. We present three models for inner Solar System formation -- the low-mass asteroid belt, Grand Tack, and Early Instability models -- each invoking a combination of migration and instability. We identify bifurcation points in planetary system formation. We present a series of events to explain why our Solar System is so weird. Jupiter's core must have formed fast enough to quench the growth of Earth's building blocks by blocking the flux of inward-drifting pebbles. The large Jupiter/Saturn mass ratio is rare among giant exoplanets but may be required to maintain Jupiter's wide orbit. The giant planets' instability must have been gentle, with no close encounters between Jupiter and Saturn, also unusual in the larger (exoplanet) context. Our Solar System is thus the outcome of multiple unusual, but not unheard of, events.

    ======================

    If we want to place a space colony or spacecraft in an Earth-Moon Trojan point, where is best?


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1812.01244

    Orbital Stability of Earth Trojans

    Lei Zhou, et al. (Submitted on 4 Dec 2018)

    The only discovery of Earth Trojan 2010 TK 7 and the subsequent launch of OSIRIS-REx motive us to investigate the stability around the triangular Lagrange points L 4 and L 5 of the Earth. In this paper we present detailed dynamical maps on the (a 0 ,i 0 ) plane with the spectral number (SN) indicating the stability. Two main stability regions, separated by a chaotic region arising from the ν 3 and ν 4 secular resonances, are found at low (i 0 ≤15 ∘ ) and moderate (24 ∘ ≤i 0 ≤37 ∘ ) inclinations respectively. The most stable orbits reside below i0 = 10∘ and they can survive the age of the Solar System. The nodal secular resonance ν 13 could vary the inclinations from 0 ∘ to ∼10 ∘ according to their initial values while ν 14 could pump up the inclinations to ∼20 ∘ and upwards. The fine structures in the dynamical maps are related to higher-degree secular resonances, of which different types dominate different areas. The dynamical behaviour of the tadpole and horseshoe orbits, reflected in their secular precession, show great differences in the frequency space. The secular resonances involving the tadpole orbits are more sensitive to the frequency drift of the inner planets, thus the instabilities could sweep across the phase space, leading to the clearance of tadpole orbits. We are more likely to find terrestrial companions on horseshoe orbits. The Yarkovsky effect could destabilize Earth Trojans in varying degrees. We numerically obtain the formula describing the stabilities affected by the Yarkovsky effect and find the asymmetry between the prograde and retrograde rotating Earth Trojans. The existence of small primordial Earth Trojans that avoid being detected but survive the Yarkovsky effect for 4.5\,Gyr is substantially ruled out.

    =====================

    What the really big supernovae have in common.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1812.01428

    The Most Luminous Supernovae

    Avishay Gal-Yam (Submitted on 28 Nov 2018)

    Over a decade ago, a group of supernova explosions with peak luminosities far exceeding (often by >100) those of normal events, has been identified. These superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) have been a focus of intensive study. I review the accumulated observations and discuss the implications for the physics of these extreme explosions. SLSNe can be classified into hydrogen poor (SLSNe-I) and hydrogen rich (SLSNe-II) events. Combining photometric and spectroscopic analysis of samples of nearby SLSNe-I and lower-luminosity events, a threshold of M_g<-19.8 mag at peak appears to separate SLSNe-I from the normal population. SLSN-I light curves can be quite complex, presenting both early bumps and late post-peak undulations. SLSNe-I spectroscopically evolve from an early hot photospheric phase with a blue continuum and weak absorption lines, through a cool photospheric phase resembling spectra of SNe Ic, and into the late nebular phase. SLSNe-II are not nearly as well studied, lacking information based on large sample studies. Proposed models for the SLSN power source are challenged to explain all the observations. SLSNe arise from massive progenitors, with some events associated with very massive stars (M>40 solar). Host galaxies of SLSNe in the nearby universe tend to have low mass and sub-solar metallicity. SLSNe are rare, with rates <100 times lower than ordinary SNe. SLSN cosmology and their use as beacons to study the high-redshift universe offer exciting future prospects.
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2018-Dec-07 at 02:05 PM.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  9. #1509
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,808
    Unexpected discovery, but on reflection perhaps it shouldn't be. I love it that the solar system color-codes itself.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1812.02190

    Col-OSSOS: Color and Inclination are Correlated Throughout the Kuiper Belt

    Michael Marsset, et al. (Submitted on 5 Dec 2018)

    Both physical and dynamical properties must be considered to constrain the origins of the dynamically excited distant Solar System populations. We present high-precision (g-r) colors for 25 small (Hr>5) dynamically excited Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs) and centaurs acquired as part of the Colours of the Outer Solar System Origins Survey (Col-OSSOS). We combine our dataset with previously published measurements and consider a set of 229 colors of outer Solar System objects on dynamically excited orbits. The overall color distribution is bimodal and can be decomposed into two distinct classes, termed `gray' and `red', that each has a normal color distribution. The two color classes have different inclination distributions: red objects have lower inclinations than the gray ones. This trend holds for all dynamically excited TNO populations. Even in the worst-case scenario, biases in the discovery surveys cannot account for this trend: it is intrinsic to the TNO population. Considering that TNOs are the precursors of centaurs, and that their inclinations are roughly preserved as they become centaurs, our finding solves the conundrum of centaurs being the only outer Solar System population identified so far to exhibit this property (Tegler et al. 2016). The different orbital distributions of the gray and red dynamically excited TNOs provide strong evidence that their colors are due to different formation locations in a disk of planetesimals with a compositional gradient.

    ==========

    THAT is a very high atmosphere!


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1812.02189

    Spectrally resolved helium absorption from the extended atmosphere of a warm Neptune-mass exoplanet

    R. Allart, et al. (Submitted on 5 Dec 2018)

    Stellar heating causes atmospheres of close-in exoplanets to expand and escape. These extended atmospheres are difficult to observe because their main spectral signature - neutral hydrogen at ultraviolet wavelengths - is strongly absorbed by interstellar medium. We report the detection of the near-infrared triplet of neutral helium in the transiting warm Neptune-mass exoplanet HAT-P-11b using ground-based, high-resolution observations. The helium feature is repeatable over two independent transits, with an average absorption depth of 1.08+/-0.05%. Interpreting absorption spectra with 3D simulations of the planet's upper atmosphere suggests it extends beyond 5 planetary radii, with a large scale height and a helium mass loss rate =< 3x10^5 g/s. A net blue-shift of the absorption might be explained by high-altitude winds flowing at 3 km/s from day to night-side.


    And more on the same exoplanet...

    Detection of Helium in the Atmosphere of the Exo-Neptune HAT-P-11b

    Megan Mansfield, et al. (Submitted on 5 Dec 2018)


    And more...

    https://phys.org/news/2018-12-helium...d-balloon.html

    Helium exoplanet inflated like a balloon, research shows
    December 6, 2018, University of Exeter

    Astronomers have discovered a distant planet with an abundance of helium in its atmosphere, which has swollen to resemble an inflated balloon. An international team of researchers, including Jessica Spake and Dr. David Sing from the University of Exeter, have detected the inert gas escaping from the atmosphere of the exoplanet HAT-P-11b—found 124 light years from Earth and in the Cygnus constellation.
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2018-Dec-07 at 02:52 PM. Reason: added another reference
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  10. #1510
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,808
    More on the end-Pliocene supernova idea. Wait, wasn't there another article on how Megalodons died out? Yeah, wait....


    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...1211112941.htm

    Did supernovae kill off large ocean animals at dawn of Pleistocene?
    December 11, 2018, University of Kansas

    The effects of a supernova -- and possibly more than one -- on large ocean life like school-bus-sized Megalodon 2.6 million years ago are detailed in a new article.

    ====

    Another view on Megalodons, as long as we're on the topic.

    https://www.livescience.com/64274-me...mperature.html

    Super-Steamy Megalodon May Have Been Too Hot to Avoid Extinction
    By Mindy Weisberger, Senior Writer | December 11, 2018 06:31am ET

    WASHINGTON — Why did the monster shark megalodon go extinct? New research has answers, and the shark's high body temperature may have played a part. Megalodon was a mega-shark, an enormous, prehistoric "Big Bad" that still fuels nightmares and fascinates scientists today. This massive fish could grow to up to 60 feet (18 meters) long, and it took down prey with a terrifying mouthful of teeth, each of which measured as long as 7 inches (18 centimeters) — longer than a human hand. Fearsome though this giant predator was, it disappeared from the oceans about 2.6 million years ago. And new research looked to the body temperature of Otodus megalodon to offer an explanation for what may have caused it to die out.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  11. #1511
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,808
    Do black holes turn into white holes?


    https://physics.aps.org/articles/v11/127

    Viewpoint: Black Hole Evolution Traced Out with Loop Quantum Gravity

    Carlo Rovelli, Center of Theoretical Physics, CNRS, Aix-Marseille University and Toulon University, Marseille, France
    December 10, 2018• Physics 11, 127

    Loop quantum gravity—a theory that extends general relativity by quantizing spacetime—predicts that black holes evolve into white holes.

    Black holes are remarkable entities. On the one hand, they have now become familiar astrophysical objects that have been observed in large numbers and in many ways: we have evidence of stellar-mass holes dancing around with a companion star, of gigantic holes at the center of galaxies pulling in spiraling disks of matter, and of black hole pairs merging in a spray of gravitational waves. All of this is beautifully accounted for by Einstein’s century-old theory of general relativity. Yet, on the other hand, black holes remain highly mysterious. We see matter falling into them, but we are in the dark about what happens to this matter when it reaches the center of the hole.

    Abhay Ashtekar and Javier Olmedo at Pennsylvania State University in University Park and Parampreet Singh at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, have taken a step toward answering this question [1]. They have shown that loop quantum gravity—a candidate theory for providing a quantum-mechanical description of gravity—predicts that spacetime continues across the center of the hole into a new region that exists in the future and has the geometry of the interior of a white hole. A white hole is the time-reversed image of a black hole: in it, matter can only move outwards.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  12. #1512
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,808
    Trying to catch up after life got in the way.

    Mapping the Milky Way gets more exciting all the time, prying hidden structures like this out of the stellar background.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1812.04999

    A Sequoia in the Garden: FSR 1758 - Dwarf Galaxy or Giant Globular Cluster?

    R. H. Barba, D. Minniti, D. Geisler, J. Alonso-Garcia, M. Hempel, A. Monachesi, J.I. Arias, F.A. Gomez (Submitted on 12 Dec 2018)

    We present the physical characterization of FSR 1758, a new large, massive object very recently discovered in the Galactic Bulge. The combination of optical data from the 2nd Gaia Data Release (GDR2) and the DECam Plane Survey (DECaPS), and near-IR data from the VISTA Variables in the V\'ıa Láctea Extended Survey (VVVX) led to a clean sample of likely members. Based on this integrated dataset, position, distance, reddening, size, metallicity, absolute magnitude, and proper motion of this object are measured. We estimate the following parameters: α=17:31:12 , δ=−39:48:30 (J2000), D=11.5±1.0 kpc, E(J−Ks)=0.20±0.03 mag, R c =10 pc, R t =150 pc, [Fe/H]=−1.5±0.3 dex, M i <−8.6±1.0 , μ α =−2.85 mas yr −1 , and μ δ =2.55 mas yr −1 . The nature of this object is discussed. If FRS 1758 is a genuine globular cluster, it is one of the largest in the Milky Way, with a size comparable or even larger than that of ω Cen, being also an extreme outlier in the size vs. Galactocentric distance diagram. The presence of a concentration of long-period RR Lyrae variable stars and blue horizontal branch stars suggests that it is a typical metal-poor globular cluster of Oosterhoff type II. Further exploration of a larger surrounding field reveals common proper motion stars, suggesting either tidal debris or that FRS\,1758 is actually the central part of a larger extended structure such as a new dwarf galaxy, tentatively named as Scorpius. In either case, this object is remarkable, and its discovery graphically illustrates the possibility to find other large objects hidden in the Galactic Bulge using future surveys.

    ============

    Perhaps another meaning for the term "red shift".

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1812.04752

    The Color and Binarity of (486958) 2014 MU69 and Other Long-Range New Horizons Kuiper Belt Targets

    Susan Benecchi, et al. (Submitted on 12 Dec 2018)

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) measured the colors of eight Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) that will be observed by the New Horizons spacecraft including its 2019 close fly-by target the Cold Classical KBO (486958) 2014 MU69. We find that the photometric colors of all eight objects are red, typical of the Cold Classical dynamical population within which most reside. Because 2014 MU69 has a similar color to that of other KBOs in the Cold Classical region of the Kuiper Belt, it may be possible to use the upcoming high-resolution New Horizons observations of 2014 MU69 to draw conclusions about the greater Cold Classical population. Additionally, HST found none of these KBOs to be binary within separations of ~0.06 arcsec (~2000 km at 44 AU range) and Δm less than or equal to 0.5. This conclusion is consistent with the lower fraction of binaries found at relatively wide separations. A few objects appear to have significant photometric variability, but our observations are not of sufficient signal-to-noise or time duration for further interpretation.


    ===========

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1812.04198

    Space weathering of the Moon from in situ detection

    Yunzhao Wu, Zhenchao Wang, Yu Lu (Submitted on 11 Dec 2018)

    Space weathering is an important surface process occurring on the Moon and other airless bodies, especially those that have no magnetic field. The optical effects of the Moon's space weathering have been largely investigated in the laboratory for lunar samples and lunar analogues. However, duplication of the pristine regolith on Earth is not possible. Here we report the space weathering from the unique perspective of the Chang'E-3's (CE-3) "Yutu" rover, building on our previous work (Wang et al. 2017; Wu and Hapke 2018). Measurement of the visually undisturbed uppermost regolith as well as locations that have been affected by rocket exhaust from the spacecraft by the Visible-Near Infrared Spectrometer (VNIS) revealed that the returned samples bring a biased information about the pristine lunar regolith. The uppermost surficial regolith is much more weathered than the regolith immediately below, and the finest fraction is rich in space weathered products. These materials are very dark and attenuated throughout the visible and near-infrared (VNIR) wavelengths, hence reduce the reflectance and mask the absorption features. The effects on the spectral slope caused by space weathering are wavelength-dependent: the visible and near-infrared continuum slope (VNCS) increases while the visible slope (VS) decreases. In the visible wavelength, the optical effects of space weathering and TiO2 are identical: both reduce albedo and blue the spectra. This suggests that developing new TiO2 abundance algorithm is needed. Optical maturity indices are composition related and hence only locally meaningful. Since optical remote sensing can only sense the uppermost few microns of regolith and since this surface tends to be very weathered, the interpretation of surface composition using optical remote sensing data needs to be carefully evaluated. Sampling the uppermost surface is suggested.

    ==========

    Why a few planets revolve backwards around their home stars?

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1812.04104

    Creating retrogradely orbiting planets by prograde stellar fly-bys

    Andreas Breslau, Susanne Pfalzner (Submitted on 10 Dec 2018)

    Several planets have been found that orbit their host star on retrograde orbits (spin-orbit angle φ > 90°). Currently, the largest measured projected angle between the orbital angular momentum axis of a planet and the rotation axis of its host star has been found for HAT-P-14b to be ≈ 171°. One possible mechanism for the formation of such misalignments is through long-term interactions between the planet and other planetary or stellar companions. However, with this process, it has been found to be difficult to achieve retrogradely orbiting planets, especially planets that almost exactly counter-orbit their host star (φ ≈ 180°) such as HAT-P-14b. By contrast, orbital misalignment can be produced efficiently by perturbations of planetary systems that are passed by stars. Here we demonstrate that not only retrograde fly-bys, but surprisingly, even prograde fly-bys can induce retrograde orbits. Our simulations show that depending on the mass ratio of the involved stars, there are significant ranges of planetary pre-encounter parameters for which counter-orbiting planets are the natural consequence. We find that the highest probability to produce counter-orbiting planets (≈ 20%) is achieved with close prograde, coplanar fly-bys of an equal-mass perturber with a pericentre distance of one-third of the initial orbital radius of the planet. For fly-bys where the pericentre distance equals the initial orbital radius of the planet, we still find a probability to produce retrograde planets of ≈ 10% for high-mass perturbers on inclined (60° < i < 120°) orbits. As usually more distant fly-bys are more common in star clusters, this means that inclined fly-bys probably lead to more retrograde planets than those with inclinations < 60°. (...)

    ========

    Unstable hypergiant stars intrigue me. Wonder what will happen which this one blows.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1812.03065

    A new outburst of the yellow hypergiant star Rho Cas

    Michaela Kraus, et al. (Submitted on 7 Dec 2018)

    Yellow hypergiants are evolved massive stars that were suggested to be in post-red supergiant stage. Post-red supergiants that evolve back to the blue, hot side of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram can intersect a temperature domain in which their atmospheres become unstable against pulsations (the Yellow Void or Yellow Wall), and the stars can experience outbursts with short, but violent mass eruptions. The yellow hypergiant Rho Cas is famous for its historical and recent outbursts, during which the star develops a cool, optically thick wind with a very brief but high mass-loss rate, causing a sudden drop in the light curve. Here we report on a new outburst of Rho Cas which occurred in 2013, accompanied by a temperature decrease of ~3000 K and a brightness drop of 0.6 mag. During the outburst TiO bands appear, together with many low excitation metallic atmospheric lines characteristic for a later spectral type. With this new outburst, it appears that the time interval between individual events decreases, which might indicate that Rho Cas is preparing for a major eruption that could help the star to pass through the Yellow Void. We also analysed the emission features that appear during phases of maximum brightness and find that they vary synchronous with the emission in the prominent [CaII] lines. We conclude that the occasionally detected emission in the spectra of Rho Cas, as well as certain asymmetries seen in the absorption lines of low to medium-excitation potential, are circumstellar in nature, and we discuss the possible origin of this material.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  13. #1513
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,808
    Revised version of paper on my favorite exoplanet, with useful data.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1804.07537

    Mass, radius, and composition of the transiting planet 55 Cnc e: using interferometry and correlations

    Aurélien Crida, Roxanne Ligi, Caroline Dorn, Yveline Lebreton (Submitted on 20 Apr 2018 (v1), last revised 13 Dec 2018 (this version, v2))

    The characterization of exoplanets relies on that of their host star. However, stellar evolution models cannot always be used to derive the mass and radius of individual stars, because many stellar internal parameters are poorly constrained. Here, we use the probability density functions (PDFs) of directly measured parameters to derive the joint PDF of the stellar and planetary mass and radius. Because combining the density and radius of the star is our most reliable way of determining its mass, we find that the stellar (respectively planetary) mass and radius are strongly (respectively moderately) correlated. We then use a generalized Bayesian inference analysis to characterize the possible interiors of 55 Cnc e. We quantify how our ability to constrain the interior improves by accounting for correlation. The information content of the mass-radius correlation is also compared with refractory element abundance constraints. We provide posterior distributions for all interior parameters of interest. Given all available data, we find that the radius of the gaseous envelope is 0.08 ± 0.05 Rp. A stronger correlation between the planetary mass and radius (potentially provided by a better estimate of the transit depth) would significantly improve interior characterization and reduce drastically the uncertainty on the gas envelope properties.

    =====

    https://phys.org/news/2018-12-young-...ht-planet.html

    A young star caught forming like a planet
    December 14, 2018, University of Leeds

    Astronomers have captured one of the most detailed views of a young star taken to date, and revealed an unexpected companion in orbit around it. While observing the young star, astronomers led by Dr. John Ilee from the University of Leeds discovered it was not in fact one star, but two. The main object, referred to as MM 1a, is a young massive star surrounded by a rotating disc of gas and dust that was the focus of the scientists' original investigation. A faint object, MM 1b, was detected just beyond the disc in orbit around MM 1a. The team believe this is one of the first examples of a "fragmented" disc to be detected around a massive young star.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  14. #1514
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,808

    Exclamation The Weird Side of arXiv (humor, strangeness, off the chain)

    This one startled me. My wife and I watch a lot of Rooster Teeth news, so this one was on target.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.02035

    Entombed: An archaeological examination of an Atari 2600 game

    John Aycock (University of Calgary, Canada), Tara Copplestone (University of York, United Kingdom) (Submitted on 5 Nov 2018)

    The act and experience of programming is, at its heart, a fundamentally human activity that results in the production of artifacts. When considering programming, therefore, it would be a glaring omission to not involve people who specialize in studying artifacts and the human activity that yields them: archaeologists. Here we consider this with respect to computer games, the focus of archaeology's nascent subarea of archaeogaming.

    One type of archaeogaming research is digital excavation, a technical examination of the code and techniques used in old games' implementation. We apply that in a case study of Entombed, an Atari 2600 game released in 1982 by US Games. The player in this game is, appropriately, an archaeologist who must make their way through a zombie-infested maze. Maze generation is a fruitful area for comparative retrogame archaeology, because a number of early games on different platforms featured mazes, and their variety of approaches can be compared. The maze in Entombed is particularly interesting: it is shaped in part by the extensive real-time constraints of the Atari 2600 platform, and also had to be generated efficiently and use next to no memory. We reverse engineered key areas of the game's code to uncover its unusual maze-generation algorithm, which we have also built a reconstruction of, and analyzed the mysterious table that drives it. In addition, we discovered what appears to be a 35-year-old bug in the code, as well as direct evidence of code-reuse practices amongst game developers.

    What further makes this game's development interesting is that, in an era where video games were typically solo projects, a total of five people were involved in various ways with Entombed. We piece together some of the backstory of the game's development and intoxicant-fueled design using interviews to complement our technical work.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  15. #1515
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,808
    One million degrees Kelvin??????????


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.02922

    Unravelling the baffling mystery of the ultrahot wind phenomenon in white dwarfs

    Nicole Reindl, et al. (Submitted on 7 Nov 2018)

    The presence of ultra-high excitation (UHE) absorption lines (e.g., O VIII) in the optical spectra of several of the hottest white dwarfs poses a decades-long mystery and is something that has never been observed in any other astrophysical object. The occurrence of such features requires a dense environment with temperatures near 10 6 K, by far exceeding the stellar effective temperature. Here we report the discovery of a new hot wind white dwarf, GALEXJ014636.8+323615. Astonishingly, we found for the first time rapid changes of the equivalent widths of the UHE features, which are correlated to the rotational period of the star (P=0.242035 d). We explain this with the presence of a wind-fed circumstellar magnetosphere in which magnetically confined wind shocks heat up the material to the high temperatures required for the creation of the UHE lines. The photometric and spectroscopic variability of GALEXJ014636.8+323615 can then be understood as consequence of the obliquity of the magnetic axis with respect to the rotation axis of the white dwarf. This is the first time a wind-fed circumstellar magnetosphere around an apparently isolated white dwarf has been discovered and finally offers a plausible explanation of the ultra hot wind phenomenon.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  16. #1516
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,808
    Not humorous, agreed, but quite strange to see data-mining still in progress for the sinking of the Titanic. Why did Rose live and whats-his-name drown? (because she didn't help him get on the board, that's why)


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.09851

    Classification of Titanic Passenger Data and Chances of Surviving the Disaster

    John Sherlock, Manoj Muniswamaiah, Lauren Clarke, Shawn Cicoria (Submitted on 22 Oct 2018)

    While the Titanic disaster occurred just over 100 years ago, it still attracts researchers looking for understanding as to why some passengers survived while others perished. With the use of a modern data mining tools (Weka) and an available dataset we take a look at what factors or classifications of passengers have a persuasive relationship towards survival for passengers that took that fateful trip on April 10, 1912. The analysis looks to identify characteristics of passengers cabin class, age, point of departure and that relationship to the chance of survival for the disaster.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  17. #1517
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    NEOTP Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    2,458
    Well, slight tangent but it seems like today's xkcd is feeling the love of arXiv.

    https://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/arxiv_2x.png

  18. #1518
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Peters Creek, Alaska
    Posts
    12,411
    Closed pending moderator discussion.

    The previous four posts have been merged from another, similar thread. This thread remains open. Have fun.
    Last edited by PetersCreek; 2018-Dec-14 at 09:54 PM.
    Forum Rules►  ◄FAQ►  ◄ATM Forum Advice►  ◄Conspiracy Advice
    Click http://cosmoquest.org/forum/images/buttons/report-40b.png to report a post (even this one) to the moderation team.


    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  19. #1519
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    35,692
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Why did Rose live and whats-his-name drown? (because she didn't help him get on the board, that's why)
    The implication I think, was that the board would not be buoyant enough to keep two people out of the water.

    passengers that took that fateful trip
    I hear seven castaways made it to a much-visited tropical isle. But eventually, they ran out of food and had to eat Gilligan.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  20. #1520
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    10,165
    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    The implication I think, was that the board would not be buoyant enough to keep two people out of the water.



    I hear seven castaways made it to a much-visited tropical isle. But eventually, they ran out of food and had to eat Gilligan.

    The next day, they found the road leading to the hotel, thereby ruining the Professor’s chances with Mary Anne
    Information about American English usage here and here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

    How do things fly? This explains it all.

    Actually they can't: "Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible." - Lord Kelvin, president, Royal Society, 1895.



  21. #1521
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    5,450
    It has been a long long while since I've been contributing here. But since Google+ is closing, maybe I'll be back...

  22. #1522
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,808
    More astronomy news of interest that cannot be classified otherwise. First off, I was unaware that nitrogen had to be delivered to Earth by infalling Kuiper Belt Objects. Learn something new every day.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1812.06956

    Late Delivery of Nitrogen to Earth

    Cheng Chen, Jeremy L. Smallwood, Rebecca G. Martin, Mario Livio (Submitted on 17 Dec 2018 (v1), last revised 18 Dec 2018 (this version, v2))

    Atmospheric nitrogen may be a necessary ingredient for the habitability of a planet since its presence helps to prevent water loss from a planet. The present day nitrogen isotopic ratio, 15 N/ 14 N, in the Earth's atmosphere is a combination of the primitive Earth's ratio and the ratio that might have been delivered in comets and asteroids. Asteroids have a nitrogen isotopic ratio that is close to the Earth's. This indicates either a similar formation environment to the Earth or that the main source of nitrogen was delivery by asteroids. However, according to geological records, the Earth's atmosphere could have been enriched in 15 N during the Archean era. Comets have higher a 15 N/ 14 N ratio than the current atmosphere of the Earth and we find that about 5% ∼ 10% of nitrogen in the atmosphere of the Earth may have been delivered by comets to explain the current Earth's atmosphere or the enriched 15 N Earth's atmosphere. We model the evolution of the radii of the snow lines of molecular nitrogen and ammonia in a protoplanetary disk and find that both have radii that put them farther from the Sun than the main asteroid belt. With an analytic secular resonance model and N--body simulations we find that the ν 8 apsidal precession secular resonance with Neptune, which is located in the Kuiper belt, is a likely origin for the nitrogen-delivering comets that impact the Earth.

    ==================

    Revision of the startling paper showing that there really WAS a universe that came before ours. We're being RECYCLED!


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1808.01740

    Apparent evidence for Hawking points in the CMB Sky

    Daniel An, Krzysztof A. Meissner, Pawel Nurowski, Roger Penrose (Submitted on 6 Aug 2018 (v1), last revised 17 Dec 2018 (this version, v3))

    This paper presents strong observational evidence (99.98% confidence) of anomalous individual points in the very early universe that appear to be sources of vast amounts of energy, revealed as specific previously unobserved signals found in the CMB sky. Though seemingly problematic for cosmic inflation, the existence of such anomalous points is an implication of conformal cyclic cosmology (CCC), as what could be the Hawking points of the theory, these being the effects of the final Hawking evaporation of supermassive black holes in the aeon prior to ours. Although of extremely low temperature at emission, in CCC this radiation is enormously concentrated by the conformal compression of the entire future of the black hole, resulting in a single point at the crossover into our current aeon, with the emission of vast numbers of (mainly) photons, whose effects we appear to be seeing as the observed anomalous points. Remarkably, the B-mode location found by BICEP 2 is at one of these anomalous points (an additional expectation of CCC).

    =============

    How do you make an entire pulsar disappear? Drop it into a black hole, of course.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1808.07887

    Black Hole Pulsar

    Janna Levin, Daniel J. D'Orazio, Sebastian Garcia-Saenz (Submitted on 23 Aug 2018 (v1), last revised 16 Dec 2018 (this version, v2))

    In anticipation of a LIGO detection of a black hole/neutron star merger, we expand on the intriguing possibility of an electromagnetic counterpart. Black hole/Neutron star mergers could be disappointingly dark since most black holes will be large enough to swallow a neutron star whole, without tidal disruption and without the subsequent fireworks. Encouragingly, we previously found a promising source of luminosity since the black hole and the highly-magnetized neutron star establish an electronic circuit -- a black hole battery. In this paper, arguing against common lore, we consider the electric charge of the black hole as an overlooked source of electromagnetic radiation. Relying on the well known Wald mechanism by which a spinning black hole immersed in an external magnetic field acquires a stable net charge, we show that a strongly-magnetized neutron star in such a binary system will give rise to a large enough charge in the black hole to allow for potentially observable effects. Although the maximum charge is stable, we show there is a continuous flux of charges contributing to the luminosity. Most interestingly, the spinning charged black hole then creates its own magnetic dipole to power a black hole pulsar.

    ===========

    Predicting what was previously unpredictable.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1808.10057

    Forecasting Gamma-Ray Bursts using Gravitational Waves

    Sarp Akcay (Submitted on 29 Aug 2018 (v1), last revised 17 Dec 2018 (this version, v2))

    We explore the intriguing possibility of employing future ground-based gravitational-wave interferometers to detect the inspiral of binary neutron stars sufficiently early to alert electromagnetic observatories so that a gamma-ray burst (GRB) can be observed in its entirety from its very beginning. We quantify the ability to predict a GRB by computing the time a binary neutron star (BNS) system takes to inspiral from its moment of detection to its final merger. We define the moment of detection to be the instant at which the interferometer network accumulates a signal-to-noise ratio of 15. For our computations, we specifically consider BNS systems at luminosity distances of (i) D≤200 Mpc for the three-interferometer Advanced-LIGO-Virgo network of 2020, and (ii) D≤1000 Mpc for Einstein Telescope's B and C configurations. In the case of Advanced LIGO-Virgo we find that we may at best get a few minutes of warning time, thus we expect no forecast of GRBs in the 2020s. On the other hand, Einstein Telescope will provide us with advance warning times of more than five hours for D≤100 Mpc. Taking one hour as a benchmark advance warning time, we obtain a corresponding range of roughly 600 Mpc for the Einstein Telescope C configuration. Using current BNS merger event rates within this volume, we show that Einstein C will forecast ≳O(10 2 ) GRBs in the 2030s. We reapply our warning-time computation to black hole - neutron star inspirals and find one to three tidal disruption events to be forecast by the same detector. This is a pedagogical introduction to gravitational-wave astronomy written at a level accessible to PhD students, advanced undergraduates, and colleagues in astronomy/astrophysics who wish to learn more about the underlying physics. Though many of our results may be known to the experts, they might nonetheless find this article motivating and exciting.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  23. #1523
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,808
    A side note to anyone looking for information on the double-neutron-star merger called GW170817: so many recent papers have come out on this topic, you'd be best off going to the SAO/NASA search engine at:

    http://cdsads.u-strasbg.fr/

    ...and just inputting the terms "2018" and "GW170817". It's just a flood.


    LATE ADD: Also same for Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs). Just too much to catalog.
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2019-Jan-03 at 04:38 PM.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  24. #1524
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,808
    An assortment of papers on planetary science, in this solar system and in others around us.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1812.07222

    A new class of Super-Earths formed from high-temperature condensates: HD219134 b, 55 Cnc e, WASP-47 e

    Caroline Dorn, John H. D. Harrison, Amy Bonsor, Tom O. Hands (Submitted on 18 Dec 2018)

    We hypothesise that differences in the temperatures at which the rocky material condensed out of the nebula gas can lead to differences in the composition of key rocky species (e.g., Fe, Mg, Si, Ca, Al, Na) and thus planet bulk density. Such differences in the observed bulk density of planets may occur as a function of radial location and time of planet formation. In this work we show that the predicted differences are on the cusp of being detectable with current instrumentation. In fact, for HD 219134, the 10% lower bulk density of planet b compared to planet c could be explained by enhancements in Ca, Al rich minerals. However, we also show that the 11% uncertainties on the individual bulk densities are not sufficiently accurate to exclude the absence of a density difference as well as differences in volatile layers. Besides HD 219134 b, we demonstrate that 55 Cnc e and WASP-47 e are similar candidates of a new Super-Earth class that have no core and are rich in Ca and Al minerals which are among the first solids that condense from a cooling proto-planetary disc. Planets of this class have densities 10-20% lower than Earth-like compositions and may have very different interior dynamics, outgassing histories and magnetic fields compared to the majority of Super-Earths.

    ==========

    A solar system with different types of super-Earths (rocky v. gaseous), first one I've heard of.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1812.07302

    Masses and radii for the three super-Earths orbiting GJ 9827, and implications for the composition of small exoplanets

    K. Rice, et al. (Submitted on 18 Dec 2018 (v1), last revised 21 Dec 2018 (this version, v2))

    Super-Earths belong to a class of planet not found in the Solar System, but which appear common in the Galaxy. Given that some super-Earths are rocky, while others retain substantial atmospheres, their study can provide clues as to the formation of both rocky planets and gaseous planets, and - in particular - they can help to constrain the role of photo-evaporation in sculpting the exoplanet population. GJ 9827 is a system already known to host 3 super-Earths with orbital periods of 1.2, 3.6 and 6.2 days. Here we use new HARPS-N radial velocity measurements, together with previously published radial velocities, to better constrain the properties of the GJ 9827 planets. Our analysis can't place a strong constraint on the mass of GJ 9827 c, but does indicate that GJ 9827 b is rocky with a composition that is probably similar to that of the Earth, while GJ 9827 d almost certainly retains a volatile envelope. Therefore, GJ 9827 hosts planets on either side of the radius gap that appears to divide super-Earths into pre-dominantly rocky ones that have radii below ∼1.5 R⊕, and ones that still retain a substantial atmosphere and/or volatile components, and have radii above ∼2 R⊕. That the less heavily irradiated of the 3 planets still retains an atmosphere, may indicate that photoevaporation has played a key role in the evolution of the planets in this system.

    ===========

    Summary of knowledge on the topic.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1812.07436

    The Interiors of Jupiter and Saturn

    Ravit Helled (Submitted on 18 Dec 2018)

    Probing the interiors of the gas giant planets in our Solar System is not an easy task. It requires a set of accurate measurements combined with theoretical models that are used to infer the planetary composition and its depth dependence. The masses of Jupiter and Saturn are 317.83 and 95.16 Earth masses, respectively, and since a few decades, we know that they mostly consist of hydrogen and helium. It is the mass of heavy elements (all elements heavier than helium) that is not well determined, as well as their distribution within the planets. While the heavy elements are not the dominating materials in Jupiter and Saturn they are the key for our understanding of their formation and evolution histories.
    The planetary internal structure is inferred from theoretical models that fit the available observational constraints by using theoretical equations of states (EOSs) for hydrogen, helium, their mixtures, and heavier elements (typically rocks and/or ices). However, there is no unique solution for the planetary structure and the results depend on the used EOSs and the model assumptions imposed by the modeler. Major model assumptions that can affect the derived internal structure include the number of layers, the heat transport mechanism within the planet (and its entropy), the nature of the core (compact vs. diluted), and the location (pressure) of separation between the two envelopes. Alternative structure models assume a less distinct division between the layers and/or a non-homogenous distribution of the heavy elements. Today, with accurate measurements of the gravitational fields of Jupiter and Saturn from the Juno and Cassini missions, structure models can be further constrained. At the same time, these measurements introduce new challenges for planetary modellers.

    ===================

    β Pictoris b is at the largest-possible size a planet can be before being called a brown dwarf. An object of great interest.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1812.11530

    A Model-Independent Mass and Moderate Eccentricity for β Pic b

    Trent J. Dupuy, Timothy D. Brandt, Kaitlin M. Kratter, Brendan P. Bowler (Submitted on 30 Dec 2018)

    We use a cross-calibration of Hipparcos and Gaia DR2 astrometry for β Pic to measure the mass of the giant planet β Pic b (13±3 M Jup) in a comprehensive joint orbit analysis that includes published relative astrometry and radial velocities. Our mass uncertainty is somewhat higher than previous work because our astrometry from the Hipparcos-Gaia Catalog of Accelerations accounts for the error inflation and systematic terms that are required to bring the two data sets onto a common astrometric reference frame, and because we fit freely for the host-star mass (1.84 ± 0.05 M⊙). This first model-independent mass for a directly imaged planet is inconsistent with cold-start models given the age of the β Pic moving group (22±6 Myr) but consistent with hot- and warm-start models, concordant with past work. We find a higher eccentricity (0.24 ± 0.06) for β Pic b compared to previous orbital fits. If confirmed by future observations, this eccentricity may help explain inner edge, scale height, and brightness asymmetry of β Pic's disk. It could also potentially signal that β Pic b has migrated inward to its current location, acquiring its eccentricity from interaction with the 3:1 outer Lindblad resonance in the disk.

    ============

    In the realm of solar system types I thought I would never see...


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1812.08358

    Kepler-730: A hot Jupiter system with a close-in, transiting, Earth-sized planet

    Caleb I. Cañas, et al. (Submitted on 20 Dec 2018)

    Kepler-730 is a planetary system hosting a statistically validated hot Jupiter in a 6.49-day orbit and an additional transiting candidate in a 2.85-day orbit. We use spectroscopic radial velocities from the APOGEE-2N instrument, Robo-AO contrast curves, and Gaia distance estimates to statistically validate the planetary nature of the additional Earth-sized candidate. We perform astrophysical false positive probability calculations for the candidate using the available Kepler data and bolster the statistical validation by using radial velocity data to exclude a family of possible binary star solutions. Using a radius estimate for the primary star derived from stellar models, we compute radii of 1.100 +0.047 −0.050 R Jup and 0.140±0.012 R Jup (1.57±0.13 R ⊕) for Kepler-730b and Kepler-730c, respectively. Kepler-730 is only the second compact system hosting a hot Jupiter with an inner, transiting planet.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  25. #1525
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,808
    Papers (that struck me as important) on supernova types, both I and II.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1812.07620

    Supernovae from blue supergiant progenitors: What a mess!

    Luc Dessart, D. John Hillier (Submitted on 18 Dec 2018)

    Since the discovery of SN (supernova) 1987A, the number of Type II-peculiar SNe has grown, revealing a rich diversity in photometric and spectroscopic properties. In this study, using a single 15Msun low-metallicity progenitor that dies as a blue supergiant (BSG), we have generated explosions with a range of energies and 56Ni masses. We then performed the radiative transfer modeling with CMFGEN from 1d until 300d after explosion. Our models yield light curves that rise to optical maximum in ~100d, with a similar brightening rate, and with a peak absolute V-band magnitude spanning from -14 to -16.5mag. All models follow a similar color evolution, entering the recombination phase within a few days of explosion, and reddening further until the nebular phase. Their spectral evolution is analogous, mostly differing in line profile width. With this model set, we study the Type II-pec SNe 1987A, 2000cb, 2006V, 2006au, 2009E, and 2009mw. Their photometric and spectroscopic diversity suggest that there is no prototypical Type II-pec SN. These SNe brighten to maximum faster than our model set, except perhaps SN2009mw. The spectral evolution of SN1987A conflicts with other observations and with model predictions from 20d until maximum: Halpha narrows and weakens while BaII lines strengthen faster than predicted, which we interpret as signatures of clumping. SN2000cb rises to maximum in only 20d and shows weak BaII lines. Its spectral evolution is well matched by an energetic ejecta but the light curve may require asymmetry. The persistent blue color, narrow lines, and weak Halpha absorption, seen in SN2006V conflicts with expectations for a BSG explosion powered by 56Ni and may require an alternative power source. In addition to diversity arising from different BSG progenitors, we surmise that their ejecta are asymmetric, clumped, and, in some cases, not solely powered by 56Ni decay.

    ================

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1901.00173

    On the mass of supernova progenitors: the role of the 12 C+ 12 C reaction

    Oscar Straniero, Luciano Piersanti, Inmaculata Dominguez, Aurora Tumino (Submitted on 1 Jan 2019)

    A precise knowledge of the masses of supernova progenitors is essential to answer various questions of modern astrophysics, such as those related to the dynamical and chemical evolution of Galaxies. In this paper we revise the upper bound for the mass of the progenitors of CO white dwarfs and the lower bound for the mass of the progenitors of normal type II supernovae. In particular, we present new stellar models with mass between 7 and 10 mass-sun, discussing their final destiny and the impact of recent improvements in our understanding of the low energy rate of the c12c12 reaction.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  26. #1526
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,808
    Rethinking the Theia hypothesis on how our Moon was formed.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1812.10502

    Inefficient volatile loss from the Moon-forming disk: reconciling the giant impact hypothesis and a wet Moon

    Miki Nakajima, David J. Stevenson (Submitted on 26 Dec 2018)

    The Earth's Moon is thought to have formed from a circumterrestrial disk generated by a giant impact between the proto-Earth and an impactor approximately 4.5 billion years ago. Since the impact was energetic, the disk would have been hot and partially vaporized. This formation process is thought to be responsible for the geochemical observation that the Moon is depleted in volatiles. This model predicts that the Moon should be significantly depleted in water as well, but this appears to contradict some of the recently measured lunar water abundances and D/H ratios that suggest that the Moon is more water-rich than previously thought. Alternatively, the Moon could have retained its water if the upper of the disk were dominated by heavier species because hydrogen would have had to diffuse out from the heavy-element rich disk, and therefore the escape rate would have been limited by this slow diffusion process (diffusion-limited escape). To identify which escape the disk would have experienced and to quantify volatiles loss from the disk, we compute the thermal structure of the Moon-forming disk considering various bulk water abundances and mid-plane disk temperatures. Our calculations show that the upper parts of the Moon-forming disk are dominated by heavy atoms or molecules and hydrogen is a minor species. This indicates that hydrogen escape would have been diffusion-limited, and therefore the amount of lost water and hydrogen would have been small compared to the initial abundance assumed. This result indicates that the giant impact hypothesis can be consistent with the water-rich Moon. Furthermore, since the hydrogen wind would have been weak, the other volatiles would not have escaped either. Thus, the observed volatile depletion of the Moon requires another mechanism.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  27. #1527
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,808
    A deep look into the data for long-period comets over the last two centuries.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1901.01722

    Discovery statistics and the 1/a-distribution of long-period comets detected over the 1801-2017 period

    Małgorzata Królikowska, et al. (Submitted on 7 Jan 2019)

    For the last two decades we have been observing a huge increase in discoveries of long-period comets (LPCs), especially those with large-perihelion distances. We collected data for a full sample of LPCs discovered over the 1801-2017 period including their osculating orbits, discovery moments (to study the discovery distances), and original semimajor axes (to study the number ratio of large-perihelion to small-perihelion LPCs in function of 1/a-original, and to construct the precise distribution of an 1/a-original). To minimize the influence of parabolic comets on these distributions we determined definitive orbits (which include eccentricities) for more than 20 LPCs previously classified as parabolic comets. We show that the percentage of large-perihelion comets is significantly higher within Oort spike comets than in a group of LPCs with a<10000 au, and this ratio of large-perihelion to small-perihelion comets for both groups has grown systematically since 1970. The different shape of the Oort spike for small-perihelion and large-perihelion LPCs is also discussed. A spectacular decrease of the ratio of large-perihelion to small-perihelion LPCs with the shortening of semimajor axis within the range of 5000-100 au is also noticed. Analysing discovery circumstances, we found that Oort spike comets are discovered statistically at larger geocentric and heliocentric distances than the remaining LPCs. This difference in the percentage of large-perihelion comets in both groups of LPCs can probably be a direct consequence of a well-known comets fading process due to ageing of their surface during the consecutive perihelion passages and/or reflects the different actual q-distributions.

    =================

    Very interesting paper on the giant planets orbiting subgiant stars. Also briefly discusses nu Ophiuchi, a giant star orbited by two brown dwarfs in planetary-type orbits.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1901.01935

    Two Jovian planets around the giant star HD202696. A growing population of packed massive planetary pairs around massive stars?

    Trifon Trifonov, et al. (Submitted on 7 Jan 2019)

    We present evidence for a new two-planet system around the giant star HD 202696 (= HIP 105056, BD+26∘4118). The discovery is based on public HIRES radial velocity measurements taken at Keck Observatory between July 2007 and September 2014. We estimate a stellar mass of 1.91 +0.09/−0.14 M⊙ for HD 202696, which is located close to the base of the red giant branch. A two-planet self-consistent dynamical modeling MCMC scheme of the radial velocity data followed by a long-term stability test suggests planetary orbital periods of Pb = 517.8 +8.9/−3.9 days and Pc = 946.6 +20.7/−20.9 days, eccentricities of eb = 0.011 +0.078/−0.011 and ec = 0.028 +0.065/−0.012, and minimum dynamical masses of mb = 2.00 +0.22/−0.10 M-Jup and mc = 1.86 +0.18/−0.23 M-Jup, respectively. Our stable MCMC samples are consistent with orbital configurations predominantly in a mean period ratio of 11:6 and its close-by high order mean-motion commensurabilities with low eccentricities. For the majority of the stable configurations we find an aligned or anti-aligned apsidal libration (i.e.\ Δω librating around 0∘ or 180∘), suggesting that the HD 202696 system is likely dominated by secular perturbations near the high-order 11:6 mean-motion resonance. The HD 202696 system is yet another Jovian mass pair around an intermediate mass star with a period ratio below the 2:1 mean motion resonance. Therefore, the HD 202696 system is an important discovery, which may shed light on the primordial disk-planet properties needed for giant planets to break the strong 2:1 mean motion resonance and settle in more compact orbits.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  28. #1528
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    The beautiful north coast (Ohio)
    Posts
    48,285
    I think this accidentally got moved to OTB; I've moved it back to S&T.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  29. #1529
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,808
    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    I think this accidentally got moved to OTB; I've moved it back to S&T.
    Thank you!
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  30. #1530
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,808
    Ultra-short-period planets (period < 1 Earth day) might be the stripped, superhot cores of mini-Neptunes or gasless super-Earths whose atmospheres boiled away long ago from stellar heat.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1803.03303

    Kepler-78 and the Ultra-Short-Period Planets

    Joshua N. Winn, Roberto Sanchis-Ojeda, Saul Rappaport (Submitted on 8 Mar 2018 (v1), last revised 9 Jan 2019 (this version, v3))

    Compared to the Earth, the exoplanet Kepler-78b has a similar size (1.2 R ⊕ ) and an orbital period a thousand times shorter (8.5 hours). It is currently the smallest planet for which the mass, radius, and dayside brightness have all been measured. Kepler-78b is an exemplar of the ultra-short-period (USP) planets, a category defined by the simple criterion P orb <1 day. We describe our Fourier-based search of the Kepler data that led to the discovery of Kepler-78b, and review what has since been learned about the population of USP planets. They are about as common as hot Jupiters, and they are almost always smaller than 2 R ⊕ . They are often members of compact multi-planet systems, although they tend to have relatively large period ratios and mutual inclinations. They might be the exposed rocky cores of "gas dwarfs," the planets between 2-4 R ⊕ in size that are commonly found in somewhat wider orbits.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 2011-Dec-14, 05:28 PM
  2. Why does arXiv ban people?
    By Noble Ox in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 2009-Nov-15, 07:02 PM
  3. Something Strange Going on at arxiv.org
    By Celestial Mechanic in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 2009-Jul-09, 01:33 PM
  4. Is anyone willing to support a BAUT member in arXiv?
    By john hunter in forum Space/Astronomy Questions and Answers
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 2007-Aug-18, 10:28 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •