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Thread: Fun Papers In Arxiv

  1. #1291
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    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0803103336.htm

    Not an arvix paper, but... we've already found sub-brown dwarfs, one of them very close to us, of planetary mass.

    This one...

    https://arxiv.org/pdf/1804.07771.pdf
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  2. #1292
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    https://arxiv.org/abs/1711.00410

    Photobiological effects at Earth's surface following a 50 pc Supernova

    Brian C. Thomas (Washburn Univ.)
    (Submitted on 1 Nov 2017)

    We investigated the potential biological impacts at Earth's surface of stratospheric O3 depletion caused by nearby supernovae known to have occurred about 2.5 and 8 million years ago at about 50 pc distance. New and previously published atmospheric chemistry modeling results were combined with radiative transfer modeling to determine changes in surface-level Solar irradiance and biological responses. We find that UVB irradiance is increased by a factor of 1.1 to 2.8, with large variation in latitude, and seasonally at high latitude regions. Changes in UVA and PAR (visible light) are much smaller. DNA damage (in vitro) is increased by factors similar to UVB, while other biological impacts (erythema, skin cancer, cataracts, marine phytoplankton photosynthesis inhibition, and plant damage) are increased by smaller amounts. We conclude that biological impacts due to increased UV irradiance in this SN case are not mass-extinction level, but might be expected to contribute to changes in species abundances; this result fits well with species turnover observed around the Pliocene-Pleistocene boundary.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  3. #1293
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Sorry, I was wrong. THIS is now my most favorite fun research paper ever. Won't even try to describe it. Hold on to your butts.

    http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.o...PSC2013-42.pdf
    Shades of Andrei Ol'khovatov's "geo-meteors"

  4. #1294
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    https://arxiv.org/pdf/1801.04608.pdf

    The origin, early evolution and predictability of solar eruptions

    Lucie Green, Tibor Torok, Bojan Vrsnak, Ward Manchester IV, Astrid Veronig
    (Submitted on 14 Jan 2018)

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were discovered in the early 1970s when space-borne coronagraphs revealed that eruptions of plasma are ejected from the Sun. Today, it is known that the Sun produces eruptive flares, filament eruptions, coronal mass ejections and failed eruptions; all thought to be due to a release of energy stored in the coronal magnetic field during its drastic reconfiguration. This review discusses the observations and physical mechanisms behind this eruptive activity, with a view to making an assessment of the current capability of forecasting these events for space weather risk and impact mitigation. Whilst a wealth of observations exist, and detailed models have been developed, there still exists a need to draw these approaches together. In particular more realistic models are encouraged in order to asses the full range of complexity of the solar atmosphere and the criteria for which an eruption is formed. From the observational side, a more detailed understanding of the role of photospheric flows and reconnection is needed in order to identify the evolutionary path that ultimately means a magnetic structure will erupt.

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    https://arxiv.org/abs/1801.06185

    Evidence of an Upper Bound on the Masses of Planets and its Implications for Giant Planet Formation

    Kevin C. Schlaufman
    (Submitted on 18 Jan 2018)

    Celestial bodies with a mass of M ~ 10 M_Jup have been found orbiting nearby stars. It is unknown whether these objects formed like gas-giant planets through core accretion or like stars through gravitational instability. I show that objects with M <~ 4 M_Jup orbit metal-rich solar-type dwarf stars, a property associated with core accretion. Objects with M >~ 10 M_Jup do not share this property. This transition is coincident with a minimum in the occurrence rate of such objects, suggesting that the maximum mass of a celestial body formed through core accretion like a planet is less than 10 M_Jup. Consequently, objects with M >~ 10 M_Jup orbiting solar-type dwarf stars likely formed through gravitational instability and should not be thought of as planets. Theoretical models of giant planet formation in scaled minimum-mass solar nebula Shakura--Sunyaev disks with standard parameters tuned to produce giant planets predict a maximum mass nearly an order of magnitude larger. To prevent newly formed giant planets from growing larger than 10 M_Jup, protoplanetary disks must therefore be significantly less viscous or of lower mass than typically assumed during the runaway gas accretion stage of giant planet formation. Either effect would act to slow the Type I/II migration of planetary embryos/giant planets and promote their survival. These inferences are insensitive to the host star mass, planet formation location, or characteristic disk dissipation time.

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    https://arxiv.org/abs/1801.06223

    Effect of Supernovae on the Local Interstellar Material

    Priscilla Frisch, Vikram V. Dwarkadas
    (Submitted on 18 Jan 2018)

    A range of astronomical data indicates that ancient supernovae created the galactic environment of the Sun and sculpted the physical properties of the interstellar medium near the heliosphere. In this paper we review the characteristics of the local interstellar medium that have been affected by supernovae. The kinematics, magnetic field, elemental abundances, and configuration of the nearest interstellar material support the view that the Sun is at the edge of the Loop I superbubble, which has merged into the low density Local Bubble. The energy source for the higher temperature X-ray emitting plasma pervading the Local Bubble is uncertain. Winds from massive stars and nearby supernovae, perhaps from the Sco-Cen Association, may have contributed radioisotopes found in the geologic record and galactic cosmic ray population. Nested supernova shells in the Orion and Sco-Cen regions suggest spatially distinct sites of episodic star formation. The heliosphere properties vary with the pressure of the surrounding interstellar cloud. A nearby supernova would modify this pressure equilibrium and thereby severely disrupt the heliosphere as well as the local interstellar medium.

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    https://arxiv.org/abs/1801.07340

    LHS 1610A: A Nearby Mid-M Dwarf with a Companion That is Likely A Brown Dwarf

    Jennifer G. Winters, Jonathan Irwin, Elisabeth R. Newton, David Charbonneau, David W. Latham, Eunkyu Han, Philip S. Muirhead, Perry Berlind, Michael L. Calkins, Gil Esquerdo
    (Submitted on 22 Jan 2018)

    We present the spectroscopic orbit of LHS 1610A, a newly discovered single-lined spectroscopic binary with a trigonometric distance placing it at 9.9 pm 0.2 pc. We obtained spectra with the TRES instrument on the 1.5m Tillinghast Reflector at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory located on Mt. Hopkins in AZ. We demonstrate the use of the TiO molecular bands at 7065 -- 7165 Angstroms to measure radial velocities and achieve an average estimated velocity uncertainty of 28 m/s. We measure the orbital period to be 10.6 days and calculate a minimum mass of 44.8 pm 3.2 Jupiter masses for the secondary, indicating that it is likely a brown dwarf. We place an upper limit to 3 sigma of 2500 K on the effective temperature of the companion from infrared spectroscopic observations using IGRINS on the 4.3m Discovery Channel Telescope. In addition, we present a new photometric rotation period of 84.3 days for the primary star using data from the MEarth-South Observatory, with which we show that the system does not eclipse.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  5. #1295
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    https://arxiv.org/abs/1801.03874

    The K2-138 System: A Near-Resonant Chain of Five Sub-Neptune Planets Discovered by Citizen Scientists

    Jessie L. Christiansen, Ian J. M. Crossfield, Geert Barentsen, Chris J. Lintott, Thomas Barclay, Brooke D. Simmons, Erik Petigura, Joshua E. Schlieder, Courtney D. Dressing, Andrew Vanderburg, David R. Ciardi, Campbell Allen, Adam McMaster, Grant Miller, Martin Veldthuis, Sarah Allen, Zach Wolfenbarger, Brian Cox, Julia Zemiro, Andrew W. Howard, John Livingston, Evan Sinukoff, Timothy Catron, Andrew Grey, Joshua J. E. Kusch, Ivan Terentev, Martin Vales, Martti H. Kristiansen
    (Submitted on 11 Jan 2018 (v1), last revised 20 Jan 2018 (this version, v2))

    K2-138 is a moderately bright (V = 12.2, K = 10.3) main sequence K-star observed in Campaign 12 of the NASA K2 mission. It hosts five small (1.6-3.3R_Earth) transiting planets in a compact architecture. The periods of the five planets are 2.35 d, 3.56 d, 5.40 d, 8.26 d, and 12.76 d, forming an unbroken chain of near 3:2 resonances. Although we do not detect the predicted 2-5 minute transit timing variations with the K2 timing precision, they may be observable by higher cadence observations with, for example, Spitzer or CHEOPS. The planets are amenable to mass measurement by precision radial velocity measurements, and therefore K2-138 could represent a new benchmark systems for comparing radial velocity and TTV masses. K2-138 is the first exoplanet discovery by citizen scientists participating in the Exoplanet Explorers project on the Zooniverse platform.

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    https://arxiv.org/abs/1801.03993

    Survival Function Analysis of Planet Size Distribution

    Li Zeng, Stein B. Jacobsen, Dimitar D. Sasselov, Andrew Vanderburg
    (Submitted on 11 Jan 2018 (v1), last revised 12 Apr 2018 (this version, v2))

    Applying the survival function analysis to the planet radius distribution of the Kepler exoplanet candidates, we have identified two natural divisions of planet radius at 4 Earth radii and 10 Earth radii. These divisions place constraints on planet formation and interior structure model. The division at 4 Earth radii separates small exoplanets from large exoplanets above. When combined with the recently-discovered radius gap at 2 Earth radii, it supports the treatment of planets 2-4 Earth radii as a separate group, likely water worlds. Thus, for planets around solar-type FGK main-sequence stars, we argue that 2 Earth radii is the separation between water-poor and water-rich planets, and 4 Earth radii is the separation between gas-poor and gas-rich planets. We confirm that the slope of survival function in between 4 and 10 Earth radii to be shallower compared to either ends, indicating a relative paucity of planets in between 4-10 Earth radii, namely, the sub-Saturnian desert there. We name them transitional planets, as they form a bridge between the gas-poor small planets and gas giants. Accordingly, we propose the following classification scheme: (<2 Earth radii) rocky planets, (2-4 Earth radii) water worlds, (4-10 Earth radii) transitional planets, and (>10 Earth radii) gas giants.

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    https://arxiv.org/abs/1801.03994

    Survival Function Analysis of Planet Orbit Distribution and Occurrence Rate Estimate

    Li Zeng, Stein B. Jacobsen, Dimitar D. Sasselov, Andrew Vanderburg
    (Submitted on 11 Jan 2018 (v1), last revised 12 Apr 2018 (this version, v2))

    Applying survival function analysis to the planet orbital period (P) and semi-major axis (a) distribution from the Kepler sample, we find that all exoplanets are uniformly distributed in (ln a) or (ln P), with an average inner cut-off of 0.05 AU to the host star. More specifically, this inner cut-off is 0.04 AU for rocky worlds (1-2 Earth radii) and 0.08 AU for water worlds (2-4 Earth radii). Moreover, the transitional planets (4-10 Earth radii) and gas giants (>10 Earth radii) have a change of slope of survival function at 0.4 AU from -1 to -1/2, suggesting a different statistical distribution uniform in \Sqrt[a] inside 0.4 AU, compared to small exoplanets (<4 Earth radii). This difference in distribution is likely caused by the difference in planet migration mechanism, and susceptibility to host stellar irradiation, for gas-poor (<4 Earth radii) versus gas-rich (>4 Earth radii) planets. Armed with this knowledge and combined with the survival function analysis of planet size distribution, we can make precise estimates of planet occurrence rate and predict the TESS mission yield.

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    https://arxiv.org/abs/1801.04031

    Mass-accreting white dwarfs and type Ia supernovae

    Bo Wang
    (Submitted on 12 Jan 2018 (v1), last revised 20 Feb 2018 (this version, v2))

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) play a prominent role in understanding the evolution of Universe. They are thought to be thermonuclear explosions of mass-accreting carbon-oxygen white dwarfs (CO WDs) in binaries, although the mass donors of the accreting WDs are still not well determined. In this article, I review recent studies on mass-accreting WDs, including H- and He-accreting WDs. I also review currently most studied progenitor models of SNe Ia, i.e., the single-degenerate model (including the WD+MS channel, the WD+RG channel and the WD+He star channel), the double-degenerate model (including the violent merger scenario) and the sub-Chandrasekhar mass model. Recent progress on these progenitor models is discussed, including the initial parameter space for producing SNe Ia, the binary evolutionary paths to SNe Ia, the progenitor candidates of SNe Ia, the possible surviving companion stars of SNe Ia, and some observational constraints, etc. Some other potential progenitor models of SNe Ia are also summarized, including the hybrid CONe WD model, the core-degenerate model, the double WD collision model, the spin-up/spin-down model, and the model of WDs near black holes. To date, it seems that two or more progenitor models are needed to explain the observed diversity among SNe Ia.

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    https://arxiv.org/abs/1801.04451

    Distribution specificities of long-period comets' perihelia. Hypothesis of the large planetary body on the periphery of the Solar System

    Ayyub Guliyev, Rustam Guliyev
    (Submitted on 13 Jan 2018)

    The present paper reviews selected aspects of the Guliyev's hypothesis about the massive celestial body at a distance of 250-400 AU from the Sun as well as the factor of comets transfer. It is shown, that the conjecture of the point around which cometary perihelia might be concentrated, is not consistent. On the issue of perihelia distribution, priority should be given to the assumption that there is a plane or planes around which the concentration takes place. A total of 24 comet groups were investigated. In almost all cases there are detected two types of planes or zones: the first one is very close to the ecliptic, another one is about perpendicular to it and has the parameters: ip = 86{\deg}, {\Omega}p = 271.7{\deg}. The existence of the first area appears to be related to the influence of giant planets. The Guliyev's hypothesis says that there is a massive perturber in the second zone, at a distance of 250-400 AU. It shows that number of aphelia and distant nodes of cometary orbits in this interval significantly exceeds the expected background. Analysis of the angular parameters of the comets, calculated relative to the second plane (reference point is the ascending node of a large circle) displays clear patterns: shortage of comets near i' = 180{\deg}, excess of them near B'= 0{\deg} (ecliptic latitude of perihelion) and shortage near B'=-90{\deg}. The analysis also shows irregularity of distant nodes, overpopulation of perihelion longitudes in the range 350{\deg}-20{\deg}. Plotted distributions of aphelia N(Q) and distant cometary nodes clearly indicate a perturbation of the natural course near 300 AU. On the basis of collected cometary data, we have estimated orbital elements of the hypothetical planetary body: a = 337 AU; e = 0.14; {\omega} = 57{\deg}; {\Omega} = 272.7{\deg}; i = 86{\deg}.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  6. #1296
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    Is the internet a reliable astronomical library? Not really. Dead links everywhere.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1801.02094

    Schroedinger's code: A preliminary study on research source code availability and link persistence in astrophysics

    Alice Allen, Peter J. Teuben, P. Wesley Ryan
    (Submitted on 6 Jan 2018 (v1), last revised 9 Feb 2018 (this version, v2))

    We examined software usage in a sample set of astrophysics research articles published in 2015 and searched for source code for the software mentioned in these research papers. We categorized the software to indicate whether source code is available for download and whether there are restrictions to accessing it, and if source code is not available, whether some other form of the software, such as a binary, is. We also extracted hyperlinks from one journal's 2015 research articles, as links in articles can serve as an acknowledgment of software use and lead to data used in the research, and tested them to determine which of these URLs are still accessible. For our sample of 715 software instances in the 166 articles we examined, we were able to categorize 418 records as to availability of source code and found that 285 unique codes were used, 58% of which offer source code available online for download. Of the 2,558 hyperlinks extracted from 1,669 research articles, at best, 90% of them were available over our testing period.

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    https://arxiv.org/abs/1801.02434

    Space climate and space weather over the past 400 years: 2. Proxy indicators of geomagnetic storm and substorm

    Mike Lockwood, Mathew J. Owens, Luke A. Barnard, Chris J. Scott, Clare E. Watt, Sarah Bentley
    (Submitted on 8 Jan 2018)

    Using the reconstruction of power input to the magnetosphere given in Paper 1 (arXiv:1708.04904), we reconstruct annual means of geomagnetic indices over the past 400 years to within a 1-sigma error of +/-20 pc. In addition, we study the behaviour of the lognormal distribution of daily and hourly values about these annual means and show that we can also reconstruct the fraction of geomagnetically-active (storm-like) days and (substorm-like) hours in each year to accuracies of 50-60 pc. The results are the first physics-based quantification of the space weather conditions in both the Dalton and Maunder minima. We predict terrestrial disturbance levels in future repeats of these minima, allowing for the weakening of Earth's dipole moment.

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    https://arxiv.org/abs/1801.03756

    The timeline of the Lunar bombardment - revisited

    A. Morbidelli, D.Nesvorny, V. Laurenz, S. Marchi, D.C. Rubie, L. Elkins-Tanton, M. Wieczorek, S.Jacobson
    (Submitted on 11 Jan 2018)

    The timeline of the lunar bombardment in the first Gy of the Solar System remains unclear. Some basin-forming impacts occurred 3.9-3.7Gy ago. Many other basins formed before, but their exact ages are not precisely known. There are two possible interpretations of the data: in the cataclysm scenario there was a surge in the impact rate approximately 3.9Gy ago, while in the accretion tail scenario the lunar bombardment declined since the era of planet formation and the latest basins formed in its tail-end. Here, we revisit the work of Morbidelli et al.(2012) that examined which scenario could be compatible with both the lunar crater record in the 3-4Gy period and the abundance of highly siderophile elements (HSE) in the lunar mantle. We use updated numerical simulations of the fluxes of impactors. Under the traditional assumption that the HSEs track the total amount of material accreted by the Moon since its formation, we conclude that only the cataclysm scenario can explain the data. The cataclysm should have started ~3.95Gy ago. However we show that HSEs could have been sequestered from the lunar mantle due to iron sulfide exsolution during magma ocean crystallization, followed by mantle overturn. Based on the hypothesis that the lunar magma ocean crystallized about 100-150My after Moon formation, and therefore that HSEs accumulated in the lunar mantle only after this time, we show that the bombardment in the 3-4Gy period can be explained in the accretion tail scenario. This hypothesis would also explain why the Moon appears so depleted in HSEs relative to the Earth. We also extend our analysis of the cataclysm and accretion tail scenarios to the case of Mars. The accretion tail scenario requires a global resurfacing event on Mars ~4.4Gy ago, possibly associated with the formation of the Borealis basin, and it is consistent with the HSE budget of the planet.

    =========================================

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1801.03820

    Venus upper clouds and the UV-absorber from MESSENGER/MASCS observations

    S. Perez-Hoyos, A. Sanchez-Lavega, A. Garcıa-Munoz, P.G.J. Irwin, J. Peralta, G. Holsclaw, W.M. McClintock, J.F. Sanz-Requena
    (Submitted on 11 Jan 2018)

    One of the most intriguing, long-standing questions regarding Venus' atmosphere is the origin and distribution of the unknown UV-absorber, responsible for the absorption band detected at the near-UV and blue range of Venus' spectrum. In this work, we use data collected by MASCS spectrograph on board the MESSENGER mission during its second Venus flyby in June 2007 to address this issue. Spectra range from 0.3 {\mu}m to 1.5 {\mu}m including some gaseous H2O and CO2 bands, as well as part of the SO2 absorption band and the core of the UV absorption. We used the NEMESIS radiative transfer code and retrieval suite to investigate the vertical distribution of particles in the Equatorial atmosphere and to retrieve the imaginary refractive indices of the UV-absorber, assumed to be well mixed with Venus' small mode-1 particles. The results show an homogeneous Equatorial atmosphere, with cloud tops (height for unity optical depth) at 75+/-2 km above surface. The UV absorption is found to be centered at 0.34+/-0.03 {\mu}m with a full width half maximum of 0.14+/-0.01 {\mu}m. Our values are compared with previous candidates for the UV aerosol absorber, among which disulfur oxide (S2O) and dioxide disulfur (S2O2) provide the best agreement with our results.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  7. #1297
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    https://arxiv.org/abs/1802.03090

    Formation of Super-Earths

    Hilke E Schlichting
    (Submitted on 9 Feb 2018)

    Super-Earths are the most abundant planets known to date and are characterized by having sizes between that of Earth and Neptune, typical orbital periods of less than 100 days and gaseous envelopes that are often massive enough to significantly contribute to the planet's overall radius. Furthermore, super-Earths regularly appear in tightly-packed multiple-planet systems, but resonant configurations in such systems are rare. This chapters summarizes current super-Earth formation theories. It starts from the formation of rocky cores and subsequent accretion of gaseous envelopes. We follow the thermal evolution of newly formed super-Earths and discuss their atmospheric mass loss due to disk dispersal, photoevaporation, core-cooling and collisions. We conclude with a comparison of observations and theoretical predictions, highlighting that even super-Earths that appear as barren rocky cores today likely formed with primordial hydrogen and helium envelopes and discuss some paths forward for the future.

    ===========================

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1802.03125

    On the Progenitors of Type Ia Supernovae

    Mario Livio, Paolo Mazzali
    (Submitted on 9 Feb 2018)

    We review all the models proposed for the progenitor systems of Type Ia supernovae and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each scenario when confronted with observations. We show that all scenarios encounter at least a few serious diffculties, if taken to represent a comprehensive model for the progenitors of all Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Consequently, we tentatively conclude that there is probably more than one channel leading SNe Ia. While the single-degenerate scenario (in which a single white dwarf accretes mass from a normal stellar companion) has been studied in some detail, the other scenarios will need a similar level of scrutiny before any firm conclusions can be drawn.

    ===========================

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1802.04360

    The consequences of a nearby supernova on the early Solar System

    Simon Portegies Zwart (1), Inti Pelupessy (2), Arjen van Elteren (1), Thomas Wijnen (1), Maria Lugaro (3) ((1) Leiden Observatory, (2) NleSC, (3) Konkoly Observatory)
    (Submitted on 12 Feb 2018 (v1), last revised 11 Apr 2018 (this version, v2))

    If the Sun was born in a relatively compact open cluster, it is quite likely that a massive (10MSun) star was nearby when it exploded in a supernova. The repercussions of a supernova can be rather profound, and the current Solar System may still bear the memory of this traumatic event. The truncation of the Kuiper belt and the tilt of the ecliptic plane with respect to the Sun's rotation axis could be such signatures. We simulated the effect of a nearby supernova on the young Solar System using the Astronomical Multipurpose Software Environment. Our calculations are realized in two subsequent steps in which we study the effect of the supernova irradiation on the circumstellar disk and the effect of the impact of the nuclear blast-wave which arrives a few decades later. We find that the blastwave of our adopted supernova exploding at a distance of 0.15--0.40\,pc and at an angle of 35∘--65∘ with respect to the angular-momentum axis of the circumsolar disk would induce a misalignment between the Sun's equator and its disk to 5∘.6±1∘.2, consistent with the current value. The blast of a supernova truncates the disk at a radius between 42and 55\,au, which is consistent with the current edge of the Kuiper belt. For the most favored parameters, the irradiation by the supernova as well as the blast wave heat the majority of the disk to ∼1200\,K, which is sufficiently hot to melt chondrules in the circumstellar disk. The majority of planetary system may have been affected by a nearby supernova, some of its repercussions, such as truncation and tilting of the disk, may still be visible in their current planetary system's topology. The amount of material from the supernova blast wave that is accreted by the circumstellar disk is too small by several orders of magnitude to explain the current abundance of the short live radionuclide
    26Al.

    =========================

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1802.04803

    Wolf 1130: A Nearby Triple System Containing a Cool, Ultramassive White Dwarf

    Gregory N. Mace, Andrew W. Mann, Brian A. Skiff, Christopher Sneden, Davy Kirkpatrick, Adam C. Schneider, Benjamin Kidder, Natalie M. Gosnell, Hwihyun Kim, Brian W. Mulligan, L. Prato, Daniel Jaffe
    (Submitted on 13 Feb 2018)

    Following the discovery of the T8 subdwarf WISEJ200520.38+542433.9 (Wolf 1130C), with common proper motion to a binary (Wolf 1130AB) consisting of an M subdwarf and a white dwarf, we set out to learn more about the old binary in the system. We find that the A and B components of Wolf 1130 are tidally locked, which is revealed by the coherence of more than a year of V band photometry phase folded to the derived orbital period of 0.4967 days. Forty new high-resolution, near-infrared spectra obtained with the Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrometer (IGRINS) provide radial velocities and a projected rotational velocity (v sin i) of 14.7 +/- 0.7 km/s for the M subdwarf. In tandem with a Gaia parallax-derived radius and verified tidal-locking, we calculate an inclination of i=29 +/- 2 degrees. From the single-lined orbital solution and the inclination we derive an absolute mass for the unseen primary (1.24+0.19-0.15 Msun). Its non-detection between 0.2 and 2.5 microns implies that it is an old (>3.7 Gyr) and cool (Teff<7000K) ONe white dwarf. This is the first ultramassive white dwarf within 25pc. The evolution of Wolf 1130AB into a cataclysmic variable is inevitable, making it a potential Type Ia supernova progenitor. The formation of a triple system with a primary mass >100 times the tertiary mass and the survival of the system through the common-envelope phase, where ~80% of the system mass was lost, is remarkable. Our analysis of Wolf 1130 allows us to infer its formation and evolutionary history, which has unique implications for understanding low-mass star and brown dwarf formation around intermediate mass stars.

    =========================

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1802.07299

    The frequency of window damage caused by bolide airbursts: a quarter century case study

    Nayeob Gi, Peter Brown, Michael Aftosmis
    (Submitted on 20 Feb 2018)

    We have empirically estimated how often fireball shocks produce overpressure at the ground sufficient to damage windows. Our study used a numerical entry model to estimate the energy deposition and shock production for a suite of 23 energetic fireballs reported by US Government sensors over the last quarter century. For each of these events we estimated the peak overpressure on the ground and the ground area above overpressure thresholds of 200 and 500 Pa where light and heavy window damage, respectively, is expected. Our results suggest that at the highest overpressure it is the rare, large fireballs (such as the Chelyabinsk fireball) which dominate the long-term areal ground footprints for heavy window damage. The height at the fireball peak brightness and the fireball entry angle contribute to the variance in ground overpressure, with lower heights and shallower angles producing larger ground footprints and more potential damage. The effective threshold energy for fireballs to produce heavy window damage is ~5 - 10 kT; such fireballs occur globally once every one to two years. These largest annual bolide events, should they occur over a major urban centre with large numbers of windows, can be expected to produce economically significant window damage. However, the mean frequency of heavy window damage (overpressure above 500 Pa) from fireball shock waves occurring over urban areas is estimated to be approximately once every 5000 years. Light window damage (overpressure above 200 Pa) is expected every ~600 years.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  8. #1298
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    https://arxiv.org/abs/1802.00378

    The influence of a sub-stellar continent on the climate of a tidally-locked exoplanet

    Neil T. Lewis, F. Hugo Lambert, Ian A. Boutle, Nathan J. Mayne, James Manners, David M. Acreman
    (Submitted on 1 Feb 2018)

    Previous studies have demonstrated that continental carbon-silicate weathering is important to the continued habitability of a terrestrial planet. Despite this, few studies have considered the influence of land on the climate of a tidally-locked planet. In this work we use the Met Office Unified Model, coupled to a land surface model, to investigate the climate effects of a continent located at the sub-stellar point. We choose to use the orbital and planetary parameters of Proxima Centauri B as a template, to allow comparison with the work of others. A region of the surface where Ts>273.15K is always retained, and previous conclusions on the habitability of Proxima Centauri B remain intact. We find that sub-stellar land causes global cooling, and increases day-night temperature contrasts by limiting heat redistribution. Furthermore, we find that sub-stellar land is able to introduce a regime change in the atmospheric circulation. Specifically, when a continent offset to the east of the sub-stellar point is introduced, we observe the formation of two mid-latitude counterrotating jets, and a substantially weakened equatorial superrotating jet.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  9. #1299
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Is the internet a reliable astronomical library? Not really. Dead links everywhere.
    Often the contents of Web pages referenced by dead links can be recovered by searching archive.org's "Wayback Machine" for their URLs. Sometimes those lost pages' non-HTML contents have been backed up there, too.

    See https://archive.org/
    Selden

  10. #1300
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    Quote Originally Posted by selden View Post
    Often the contents of Web pages referenced by dead links can be recovered by searching archive.org's "Wayback Machine" for their URLs. Sometimes those lost pages' non-HTML contents have been backed up there, too.

    See https://archive.org/
    I hope so. I think the paper was called "Schroedinger's code" because until you open the link, you don't know if it is live or dead. (ba-dum-DUM).
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  11. #1301
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    Another weirdo nerd hot Jovian planet... spiraling into its sun.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1808.00052

    Understanding WASP-12b

    Avery Bailey, Jeremy Goodman
    (Submitted on 31 Jul 2018)

    The orbital period of the hot Jupiter WASP-12b is apparently changing. We study whether this reflects orbital decay due to tidal dissipation in the star, or apsidal precession of a slightly eccentric orbit. In the latter case, a third body or other perturbation would be needed to sustain the eccentricity against tidal dissipation in the planet itself. We have analyzed several such perturbative scenarios, but none is satisfactory. Most likely therefore, the orbit really is decaying. If this is due to a dynamical tide, then WASP-12 should be a subgiant without a convective core as Weinberg et al. (2017) have suggested. We have modeled the star with the MESA code. While no model fits all of the observational constraints, including the luminosity implied by the GAIA DR2 distance, main-sequence models are less discrepant than subgiant ones.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  12. #1302
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    https://arxiv.org/abs/1808.01402

    The Gas Composition and Deep Cloud Structure of Jupiter's Great Red Spot

    Gordon L. Bjoraker, Michael H. Wong, Imke de Pater, Tilak Hewagama, Mate Adamkovics, Glenn S. Orton
    (Submitted on 4 Aug 2018)

    We have obtained high-resolution spectra of Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) between 4.6 and 5.4 microns using telescopes on Mauna Kea in order to derive gas abundances and to constrain its cloud structure between 0.5 and 5~bars. We used line profiles of deuterated methane CH3D at 4.66 microns to infer the presence of an opaque cloud at 5+/-1 bar. From thermochemical models this is almost certainly a water cloud. We also used the strength of Fraunhofer lines in the GRS to obtain the ratio of reflected sunlight to thermal emission. The level of the reflecting layer was constrained to be at 570+/-30 mbar based on fitting strong ammonia lines at 5.32 microns. We identify this layer as an ammonia cloud based on the temperature where gaseous ammonia condenses. We found evidence for a strongly absorbing, but not totally opaque, cloud layer at pressures deeper than 1.3 bar by combining Cassini/CIRS spectra of the GRS at 7.18 microns with ground-based spectra at 5 microns. This is consistent with the predicted level of an NH4SH cloud. We also constrained the vertical profile of water and ammonia. The GRS spectrum is matched by a saturated water profile above an opaque water cloud at 5~bars. The pressure of the water cloud constrains Jupiter's O/H ratio to be at least 1.1 times solar. The ammonia mole fraction is 200+/-50ppm for pressures between 0.7 and 5 bar. Its abundance is 40 ppm at the estimated pressure of the reflecting layer. We obtained 0.8+/-0.2 ppm for PH3, a factor of 2 higher than in the warm collar surrounding the GRS. We detected all 5 naturally occurring isotopes of germanium in GeH4 in the Great Red Spot. We obtained an average value of 0.35+/-0.05 ppb for GeH4. Finally, we measured 0.8+/-0.2 ppb for CO in the deep atmosphere.

    ==============================================

    He was THIS CLOSE to reading this paper. Rats.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1808.01740

    Apparent evidence for Hawking points in the CMB Sky

    Daniel An, Krzysztof A. Meissner, Roger Penrose
    (Submitted on 6 Aug 2018)

    This paper presents powerful observational evidence of anomalous individual points in the very early universe that appear to be sources of vast amounts of energy, revealed as specific signals found in the CMB sky. Though seemingly problematic for cosmic inflation, the existence of such anomalous points is an implication of conformal cyclic cosmology (CCC), as what could be the Hawking points of the theory, these being the effects of the final Hawking evaporation of supermassive black holes in the aeon prior to ours. Although of extremely low temperature at emission, in CCC this radiation is enormously concentrated by the conformal compression of the entire future of the black hole, resulting in a single point at the crossover into our current aeon, with the emission of vast numbers of particles, whose effects we appear to be seeing as the observed anomalous points. Remarkably, the B-mode location found by BICEP 2 is at one of these anomalous points.

    =============================================

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1808.01862

    Yes, Aboriginal Australians Can and Did Discover the Variability of Betelgeuse

    Bradley E. Schaefer
    (Submitted on 26 Jun 2018)

    Recently, a widely publicized claim has been made that the Aboriginal Australians discovered the variability of the red star Betelgeuse in the modern Orion, plus the variability of two other prominent red stars: Aldebaran and Antares. This result has excited the usual healthy skepticism, with questions about whether any untrained peoples can discover the variability and whether such a discovery is likely to be placed into lore and transmitted for long periods of time. Here, I am offering an independent evaluation, based on broad experience with naked-eye sky viewing and astro-history. I find that it is easy for inexperienced observers to detect the variability of Betelgeuse over its range in brightness from V = 0.0 to V = 1.3, for example in noticing from season-to-season that the star varies from significantly brighter than Procyon to being greatly fainter than Procyon. Further, indigenous peoples in the Southern Hemisphere inevitably kept watch on the prominent red star, so it is inevitable that the variability of Betelgeuse was discovered many times over during the last 65 millennia. The processes of placing this discovery into a cultural context (in this case, put into morality stories) and the faithful transmission for many millennia is confidently known for the Aboriginal Australians in particular. So this shows that the whole claim for a changing Betelgeuse in the Aboriginal Australian lore is both plausible and likely. Given that the discovery and transmission is easily possible, the real proof is that the Aboriginal lore gives an unambiguous statement that these stars do indeed vary in brightness, as collected by many ethnographers over a century ago from many Aboriginal groups. So I strongly conclude that the Aboriginal Australians could and did discover the variability of Betelgeuse, Aldebaran, and Antares.

    ============================================

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1805.00096

    From thermal dissociation to condensation in the atmospheres of ultra hot Jupiters: WASP-121b in context

    Vivien Parmentier, Mike R. Line, Jacob L. Bean, Megan Mansfield, Laura Kreidberg, Roxana Lupu, Channon Visscher, Jean-Michel Desert, Jonathan J. Fortney, Magalie Deleuil, Jacob Arcangeli, Adam P. Showman, Mark S. Marley
    (Submitted on 30 Apr 2018 (v1), last revised 6 Aug 2018 (this version, v2))

    A new class of exoplanets has emerged: the ultra hot Jupiters, the hottest close-in gas giants. Most of them have weaker than expected spectral features in the 1.1−1.7μm bandpass probed by HST/WFC3 but stronger spectral features at longer wavelengths probed by Spitzer. This led previous authors to puzzling conclusions about the thermal structures and chemical abundances of these planets. Using the SPARC/MITgcm, we investigate how thermal dissociation, ionization, H− opacity and clouds shape the thermal structures and spectral properties of ultra hot Jupiters with a special focus on WASP-121b. We expand our findings to the whole population of ultra hot Jupiters through analytical quantification of the thermal dissociation and its influence on the strength of spectral features. We predict that most molecules are thermally dissociated and alkalies are ionized in the dayside photospheres of ultra hot Jupiters. This includes H2O, TiO, VO, and H2 but not CO, which has a stronger molecular bond. The vertical molecular gradient created by the dissociation significantly weakens the spectral features from water while the 4.5μm CO feature remain unchanged. The water band in the HST/WFC3 bandpass is further weakened by H − continuum opacity. Molecules are expected to recombine before reaching the limb, leading to order of magnitude variations of the chemical composition and cloud coverage between the limb and the dayside. Overall, molecular dissociation provides a qualitative understanding of the lack of strong spectral feature of water in the 1−2μm bandpass observed in most ultra hot Jupiters. Quantitatively, however, our model does not provide a satisfactory match to the WASP-121b emission spectrum. Together with WASP-33b and Kepler-33Ab, they seem the outliers among the population of ultra hot Jupiters in need of a more thorough understanding.

    ======================================

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1805.04845

    Possible white dwarf progenitors of type Ia supernovae

    Ealeal Bear, Noam Soker (Technion, Israel)
    (Submitted on 13 May 2018 (v1), last revised 4 Aug 2018 (this version, v3))

    We examine catalogs of white dwarfs (WDs) and find that there are sufficient number of massive WDs, M_WD > 1.35Mo, that might potentially explode as type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the frame of the core degenerate scenario. In the core degenerate scenario a WD merges with the carbon-oxygen core of a giant star, and they form a massive WD that might explode with a time delay of years to billions of years. If the core degenerate scenario accounts for all SNe Ia, then we calculate that about 0.2 per cent of the present WDs in the Galaxy are massive. Furthermore, we find from the catalogs that the fraction of massive WDs relative to all WDs is about 1-3 per cent, with large uncertainties. Namely, five to ten times the required number. If there are many SNe Ia that result from lower mass WDs, M_WD < 1.3Mo, for which another scenario is responsible for, and the core degenerate scenario accounts only for the SNe Ia that explode as massive WDs, then the ratio of observed massive WDs to required is larger even. Our finding leaves the core degenerate scenario as a viable and promising SN Ia scenario.

    ======================================

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1708.00605

    Classifying Exoplanets with Gaussian Mixture Model

    Soham Kulkarni, Shantanu Desai
    (Submitted on 2 Aug 2017 (v1), last revised 1 Jun 2018 (this version, v2))

    Recently, Odrzywolek and Rafelski (arXiv:1612.03556) have found three distinct categories of exoplanets, when they are classified based on density. We first carry out a similar classification of exoplanets according to their density using the Gaussian Mixture Model, followed by information theoretic criterion (AIC and BIC) to determine the optimum number of components. Such a one-dimensional classification favors two components using AIC and three using BIC, but the statistical significance from both the tests is not significant enough to decisively pick the best model between two and three components. We then extend this GMM-based classification to two dimensions by using both the density and the Earth similarity index (arXiv:1702.03678), which is a measure of how similar each planet is compared to the Earth. For this two-dimensional classification, both AIC and BIC provide decisive evidence in favor of three components.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  13. #1303
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    https://arxiv.org/abs/1808.01294

    The Mira-based distance to the Galactic centre

    Wenzer Qin, David M. Nataf, Nadia Zakamska, Peter R. Wood, Luca Casagrande
    (Submitted on 3 Aug 2018)

    Mira variables are useful distance indicators, due to their high luminosities and well-defined period-luminosity relation. We select 1863 Miras from SAAO and MACHO observations to examine their use as distance estimators in the Milky Way. We measure a distance to the Galactic centre of R0=7.9±0.3kpc, which is in good agreement with other literature values. The uncertainty has two components of ∼0.2 kpc each: the first is from our analysis and predominantly due to interstellar extinction, the second is due to zero-point uncertainties extrinsic to our investigation, such as the distance to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). In an attempt to improve existing period-luminosity calibrations, we use theoretical models of Miras to determine the dependence of the period-luminosity relation on age, metallicity, and helium abundance, under the assumption that Miras trace the bulk stellar population. We find that at a fixed period of logP=2.4, changes in the predicted Ks magnitudes can be approximated by ΔMKs≈−0.109(Δ[Fe/H])+0.033(Δt/Gyr)+0.021(ΔY/0.01), and these coefficients are nearly independent of period. The expected overestimate in the Galactic centre distance from using an LMC-calibrated relation is ∼0.3 kpc. This prediction is not validated by our analysis; a few possible reasons are discussed. We separately show that while the predicted color-color diagrams of solar-neighbourhood Miras work well in the near-infrared, though there are offsets from the model predictions in the optical and mid-infrared.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  14. #1304
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    https://arxiv.org/abs/1803.07040

    Habitability from Tidally-Induced Tectonics

    Diana Valencia, Vivian Yun Yan Tan, Zachary Zajac
    (Submitted on 19 Mar 2018)

    The stability of Earth's climate on geological timescales is enabled by the carbon-silicate cycle that acts as a negative feedback mechanism stabilizing surface temperatures via the intake and outgas of atmospheric carbon. On Earth, this thermostat is enabled by plate tectonics that sequesters outgassed CO2 back into the mantle via weathering and subduction at convergent margins. Here we propose a separate tectonic mechanism -- vertical recycling -- that can serve as the vehicle for CO2 outgassing and sequestration over long timescales. The mechanism requires continuous tidal heating, which makes it particularly relevant to planets in the habitable zone of M stars. Dynamical models of this vertical recycling scenario and stability analysis show that temperate climates stable over Gy timescales are realized for a variety of initial conditions, even as the M star dims over time. The magnitude of equilibrium surface temperatures depends on the interplay of sea weathering and outgassing, which in turn depends on planetary carbon content, so that planets with lower carbon budgets are favoured for temperate conditions. Habitability of planets such as found in the Trappist-1 may be rooted in tidally-driven tectonics.

    ====================================

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1805.00019

    Moonfalls: Collisions between the Earth and its past moons

    Uri Malamud, Hagai B. Perets, Christoph Schafer, Christoph Burger
    (Submitted on 30 Apr 2018)

    During the last stages of the terrestrial planet formation, planets grow mainly through giant-impacts with large planetary embryos. The Earth's Moon was suggested to form through one of these impacts. However, since the proto-Earth has experienced many giant-impacts, several moons are naturally expected to form through a sequence of multiple (including smaller scale) impacts. Each impact potentially forms a sub-Lunar mass moonlet that interacts gravitationally with the proto-Earth and possibly with previously-formed moonlets. Such interactions result in either moonlet-moonlet mergers, moonlet ejections or infall of moonlets on the Earth. The latter possibility, leading to low-velocity moonlet-Earth collisions is explored here for the first time. We make use of SPH simulations and consider a range of moonlet masses, collision impact-angles and initial proto-Earth rotation rates. We find that grazing/tidal-collisions are the most frequent and produce comparable fractions of accreted-material and debris. The latter typically clump in smaller moonlets that can potentially later interact with other moonlets. Other collision geometries are more rare. Head-on collisions do not produce much debris and are effectively perfect mergers. Intermediate impact angles result in debris mass-fractions in the range of 2-25% where most of the material is unbound. Retrograde collisions produce more debris than prograde collisions, whose fractions depend on the proto-Earth initial rotation rate. Moonfalls can slightly change the rotation-rate of the proto-Earth. Accreted moonfall material is highly localized, potentially explaining the isotopic heterogeneities in highly siderophile elements in terrestrial rocks, and possibly forming primordial super-continent topographic features. Our results can be used for simple scaling laws and applied to n-body studies of the formation of the Earth and Moon.

    =====================================

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1805.00283

    Exo-Milankovitch Cycles II: Climates of G-dwarf Planets in Dynamically Hot Systems

    Russell Deitrick, Rory Barnes, Cecilia Bitz, David Fleming, Benjamin Charnay, Victoria Meadows, Caitlyn Wilhelm, John Armstrong, Thomas R. Quinn
    (Submitted on 1 May 2018)

    Using an energy balance model with ice sheets, we examine the climate response of an Earth-like planet orbiting a G dwarf star and experiencing large orbital and obliquity variations. We find that ice caps couple strongly to the orbital forcing, leading to extreme ice ages. In contrast with previous studies, we find that such exo-Milankovitch cycles tend to impair habitability by inducing snowball states within the habitable zone. The large amplitude changes in obliquity and eccentricity cause the ice edge, the lowest latitude extent of the ice caps, to become unstable and grow to the equator. We apply an analytical theory of the ice edge latitude to show that obliquity is the primary driver of the instability. The thermal inertia of the ice sheets and the spectral energy distribution of the G dwarf star increase the sensitivity of the model to triggering runaway glaciation. Finally, we apply a machine learning algorithm to demonstrate how this technique can be used to extend the power of climate models. This work illustrates the importance of orbital evolution for habitability in dynamically rich planetary systems. We emphasize that as potentially habitable planets are discovered around G dwarfs, we need to consider orbital dynamics.

    =====================================

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1805.01227

    Gaia Reveals Evidence for Merged White Dwarfs

    Mukremin Kilic, N. C. Hambly, P. Bergeron, C. Genest-Beaulieu, N. Rowell
    (Submitted on 3 May 2018 (v1), last revised 13 Jun 2018 (this version, v4))

    We use Gaia Data Release 2 to identify 13,928 white dwarfs within 100 pc of the Sun. The exquisite astrometry from Gaia reveals for the first time a bifurcation in the observed white dwarf sequence in both Gaia and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) passbands. The latter is easily explained by a helium atmosphere white dwarf fraction of 36%. However, the bifurcation in the Gaia colour-magnitude diagram depends on both the atmospheric composition and the mass distribution. We simulate theoretical colour-magnitude diagrams for single and binary white dwarfs using a population synthesis approach and demonstrate that there is a significant contribution from relatively massive white dwarfs that likely formed through mergers. These include white dwarf remnants of main-sequence (blue stragglers) and post-main sequence mergers. The mass distribution of the SDSS subsample, including the spectroscopically confirmed white dwarfs, also shows this massive bump. This is the first direct detection of such a population in a volume-limited sample.

    ====================================

    Gas giant with a comet-like tail?

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1805.01298

    Helium in the eroding atmosphere of an exoplanet

    J. J. Spake, D. K. Sing, T. M. Evans, A. Oklopčić, V. Bourrier, L. Kreidberg, B. V. Rackham, J. Irwin, D. Ehrenreich, A. Wyttenbach, H. R. Wakeford, Y. Zhou, K. L. Chubb, N. Nikolov, J. M. Goyal, G. W. Henry, M. H. Williamson, S. Blumenthal, D. R. Anderson, C. Hellier, D. Charbonneau, S. Udry, N. Madhusudhan
    (Submitted on 3 May 2018)

    Helium is the second-most abundant element in the Universe after hydrogen and is one of the main constituents of gas-giant planets in our Solar System. Early theoretical models predicted helium to be among the most readily detectable species in the atmospheres of exoplanets, especially in extended and escaping atmospheres. Searches for helium, however, have hitherto been unsuccessful. Here we report observations of helium on an exoplanet, at a confidence level of 4.5 standard deviations. We measured the near- infrared transmission spectrum of the warm gas giant WASP-107b and identified the narrow absorption feature of excited metastable helium at 10,833 angstroms. The amplitude of the feature, in transit depth, is 0.049 +/- 0.011 per cent in a bandpass of 98 angstroms, which is more than five times greater than what could be caused by nominal stellar chromospheric activity. This large absorption signal suggests that WASP-107b has an extended atmosphere that is eroding at a total rate of 10^10 to 3 x 10^11 grams per second (0.1-4 per cent of its total mass per billion years), and may have a comet-like tail of gas shaped by radiation pressure.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  15. #1305
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    https://arxiv.org/abs/1805.02804

    Unconfirmed Near-Earth Objects

    Peter Vereš, Matthew J. Payne, Matthew J. Holman, Davide Farnocchia, Gareth V. Williams, Sonia Keys, Ian Boardman
    (Submitted on 8 May 2018 (v1), last revised 30 May 2018 (this version, v3))

    We studied the Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) candidates posted on the Minor Planet Center's Near-Earth Object Confirmation Page (NEOCP) between years 2013 and 2016. Out of more than 17,000 NEA candidates, while the majority became either new discoveries or were associated with previously known objects, about 11% were unable to be followed-up or confirmed. We further demonstrate that of the unconfirmed candidates, 926+/-50 are likely to be NEAs, representing 18% of discovered NEAs in that period. Only 11% (~93) of the unconfirmed NEA candidates were large (having absolute magnitude H<22). To identify the reasons why these NEAs were not recovered, we analyzed those from the most prolific asteroid surveys: Pan-STARRS, the Catalina Sky Survey, the Dark Energy Survey, and the Space Surveillance Telescope. We examined the influence of plane-of-sky positions and rates of motion, brightnesses, submission delays, and computed absolute magnitudes, as well as correlations with the phase of the moon and seasonal effects. We find that delayed submission of newly discovered NEA candidate to the NEOCP drove a large fraction of the unconfirmed NEA candidates. A high rate of motion was another significant contributing factor. We suggest that prompt submission of suspected NEA discoveries and rapid response to fast moving targets and targets with fast growing ephemeris uncertainty would allow better coordination among dedicated follow-up observers, decrease the number of unconfirmed NEA candidates, and increase the discovery rate of NEAs.

    ========================================

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1805.03194

    Old, Metal-Poor Extreme Velocity Stars in the Solar Neighborhood

    Kohei Hattori, Monica Valluri, Eric F. Bell, Ian U. Roederer
    (Submitted on 8 May 2018 (v1), last revised 24 May 2018 (this version, v2))

    We report the discovery of 30 stars with extreme space velocities (> 480 km/s) in the Gaia-DR2 archive. These stars are a subset of 1743 stars with high-precision parallax, large tangential velocity (v_{tan}>300 km/s), and measured line-of-sight velocity in DR2. By tracing the orbits of the stars back in time, we find at least one of them is consistent with having been ejected by the supermassive black hole at the Galactic center. Another star has an orbit that passes near the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) about 200 Myr ago. Unlike previously discovered blue hypervelocity stars, our sample is metal-poor (-1.5 < [Fe/H] < -1.0) and quite old (>1 Gyr). We discuss possible mechanisms for accelerating old stars to such extreme velocities. The high observed space density of this population, relative to potential acceleration mechanisms, implies that these stars are probably bound to the Milky Way. If they are bound, the discovery of this population would require a local escape speed of around 600 km/s and consequently imply a virial mass of M_{200} = 1.4 x 10^{12} Msun for the Milky Way.

    ===========================================

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1805.03207

    Type Ia Supernovae: Where Are They Coming From and Where Will They Lead Us?

    Ferdinando Patat, Na'ama Hallakoun
    (Submitted on 8 May 2018)

    We present a summary of our understanding of Type Ia Supernova progenitors, mostly discussing the observational approach. The main goal of this review is to provide the non-specialist with a sufficiently comprehensive view of where we stand.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  16. #1306
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    http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018SSRv..214...20J

    The Science of Sungrazers, Sunskirters, and Other Near-Sun Comets

    Jones, Geraint H.; Knight, Matthew M.; Battams, Karl; Boice, Daniel C.; Brown, John; Giordano, Silvio; Raymond, John; Snodgrass, Colin; Steckloff, Jordan K.; Weissman, Paul; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Lisse, Carey; Opitom, Cyrielle; Birkett, Kimberley S.; Bzowski, Maciej; Decock, Alice; Mann, Ingrid; Ramanjooloo, Yudish; McCauley, Patrick
    02/2018

    This review addresses our current understanding of comets that venture close to the Sun, and are hence exposed to much more extreme conditions than comets that are typically studied from Earth. The extreme solar heating and plasma environments that these objects encounter change many aspects of their behaviour, thus yielding valuable information on both the comets themselves that complements other data we have on primitive solar system bodies, as well as on the near-solar environment which they traverse. We propose clear definitions for these comets: We use the term near-Sun comets to encompass all objects that pass sunward of the perihelion distance of planet Mercury (0.307 AU). Sunskirters are defined as objects that pass within 33 solar radii of the Sun's centre, equal to half of Mercury's perihelion distance, and the commonly-used phrase sungrazers to be objects that reach perihelion within 3.45 solar radii, i.e. the fluid Roche limit. Finally, comets with orbits that intersect the solar photosphere are termed sundivers. We summarize past studies of these objects, as well as the instruments and facilities used to study them, including space-based platforms that have led to a recent revolution in the quantity and quality of relevant observations. Relevant comet populations are described, including the Kreutz, Marsden, Kracht, and Meyer groups, near-Sun asteroids, and a brief discussion of their origins. The importance of light curves and the clues they provide on cometary composition are emphasized, together with what information has been gleaned about nucleus parameters, including the sizes and masses of objects and their families, and their tensile strengths. The physical processes occurring at these objects are considered in some detail, including the disruption of nuclei, sublimation, and ionisation, and we consider the mass, momentum, and energy loss of comets in the corona and those that venture to lower altitudes. The different components of comae and tails are described, including dust, neutral and ionised gases, their chemical reactions, and their contributions to the near-Sun environment. Comet-solar wind interactions are discussed, including the use of comets as probes of solar wind and coronal conditions in their vicinities. We address the relevance of work on comets near the Sun to similar objects orbiting other stars, and conclude with a discussion of future directions for the field and the planned ground- and space-based facilities that will allow us to address those science topics.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  17. #1307
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    accidentally repeated a couple of articles, sorry, will check more carefully in the future
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  18. #1308
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    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2018-Aug-08 at 12:54 PM.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  19. #1309
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    https://arxiv.org/abs/1808.02118

    Great Expectations: Plans and Predictions for New Horizons Encounter with Kuiper Belt Object 2014 MU69 ('Ultima Thule')

    Jeffrey M. Moore, William B. McKinnon, Dale P. Cruikshank, G. Randall Gladstone, John R. Spencer, S. Alan Stern, Harold A. Weaver, Kelsi N. Singer, Mark R. Showalter, William M. Grundy, Ross A. Beyer, Oliver L. White, Richard P. Binzel, Marc W. Buie, Bonnie J. Buratti, Andrew F. Cheng, Carly Howett, Cathy B. Olkin, Alex H. Parker, Simon B. Porter, Paul M. Schenk, Henry B. Throop, Anne J. Verbiscer, Leslie A. Young, Susan D. Benecchi, Veronica J. Bray, Carrie. L. Chavez, Rajani D. Dhingra, Alan D. Howard, Tod R. Lauer, C. M. Lisse, Stuart J. Robbins, Kirby D. Runyon, Orkan M. Umurhan
    (Submitted on 6 Aug 2018)

    The New Horizons encounter with the cold classical Kuiper Belt object (KBO) 2014 MU69 (informally named 'Ultima Thule,' hereafter Ultima) on 1 January 2019 will be the first time a spacecraft has ever closely observed one of the free-orbiting small denizens of the Kuiper Belt. Related to but not thought to have formed in the same region of the Solar System as the comets that been explored so far, it will also be the largest, most distant, and most primitive body yet visited by spacecraft. In this letter we begin with a brief overview of cold classical KBOs, of which Ultima is a prime example. We give a short preview of our encounter plans. We note what is currently known about Ultima from earth-based observations. We then review our expectations and capabilities to evaluate Ultima's composition, surface geology, structure, near space environment, small moons, rings, and the search for activity.

    ============================================

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1808.02146

    Dynamical effects on the classical Kuiper Belt during the excited-Neptune model

    Rafael Ribeiro de Sousa, Rodney Gomes, Alessandro Morbidelli, Ernesto Vieira Neto
    (Submitted on 6 Aug 2018)

    The link between the dynamical evolution of the giant planets and the Kuiper Belt orbital structure can provide clues and insight about the dynamical history of the Solar System. The classical region of the Kuiper Belt has two populations (the cold and hot populations) with completely different physical and dynamical properties. These properties have been explained in the framework of a subset of the simulations of the Nice Model, in which Neptune remained on a low-eccentricity orbit (Neptune's eccentricity is never larger than 0.1) throughout the giant planet instability. However, recent simulations have showed that the remaining Nice model simulations, in which Neptune temporarily acquires a large-eccentricity orbit (larger than 0.1), are also consistent with the preservation of the cold population (inclination smaller than 4 degrees), if the latter formed in situ. However, the resulting a cold population showed in many of the simulations eccentricities larger than those observed for the real population. We focus on a short period of time which is characterized by Neptune's large eccentricity and a slow precession of Neptune's perihelion. We show that if self-gravity is considered in the disk, the precession rate of the particles longitude of perihelion is slowed down. This, combined with the effect of mutual scattering among the bodies, which spreads all orbital elements, allows some objects to return to low eccentricities. However, we show that if the cold population originally had a small total mass, this effect is negligible. Thus, we conclude that the only possibilities to keep at low eccentricity some cold-population objects during a high-eccentricity phase of Neptune are that (i) either Neptune's precession was rapid, as suggested by Batygin et al. (2011) or (ii) Neptune's slow precession phase was long enough to allow some particles to experience a full secular cycle.

    =============================================

    Everyone loves using AD Leonis as a model for worst-case planetary scenarios.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1808.02347

    New Insights into Cosmic Ray induced Biosignature Chemistry in Earth-like Atmospheres

    Markus Scheucher, J. L. Grenfell, F. Wunderlich, M. Godolt, F. Schreier, H. Rauer
    (Submitted on 7 Aug 2018)

    With the recent discoveries of terrestrial planets around active M-dwarfs, destruction processes masking the possible presence of life are receiving increased attention in the exoplanet community. We investigate potential biosignatures of planets having Earth-like (N 2 -O 2 ) atmospheres orbiting in the habitable zone of the M-dwarf star AD Leo. These are bombarded by high energetic particles which can create showers of secondary particles at the surface. We apply our cloud-free 1D climate-chemistry model to study the influence of key particle shower parameters and chemical efficiencies of NOx and HOx production from cosmic rays. We determine the effect of stellar radiation and cosmic rays upon atmospheric composition, temperature, and spectral appearance. Despite strong stratospheric O 3 destruction by cosmic rays, smog O 3 can significantly build up in the lower atmosphere of our modeled planet around AD Leo related to low stellar UVB. N 2 O abundances decrease with increasing flaring energies but a sink reaction for N 2 O with excited oxygen becomes weaker, stabilizing its abundance. CH 4 is removed mainly by Cl in the upper atmosphere for strong flaring cases and not via hydroxyl as is otherwise usually the case. Cosmic rays weaken the role of CH 4 in heating the middle atmosphere so that H 2 O absorption becomes more important. We additionally underline the importance of HNO 3 as a possible marker for strong stellar particle showers. In a nutshell, uncertainty in NOx and HOx production from cosmic rays significantly influences biosignature abundances and spectral appearance.

    ==============================================

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1808.02448

    Forming Mercury by Giant Impacts

    Alice Chau, Christian Reinhardt, Ravit Helled, Joachim Gerhard Stadel
    (Submitted on 7 Aug 2018)

    The origin of Mercury's high iron-to-rock ratio is still unknown. In this work we investigate Mercury's formation via giant impacts and consider the possibilities of a single giant impact, a hit-and-run, and multiple collisions in one theoretical framework. We study the standard collision parameters (impact velocity, mass ratio, impact parameter), along with the impactor's composition and the cooling of the target. It is found that the impactor's composition affects the iron distribution within the planet and the final mass of the target by up to 15\%, although the resulting mean iron fraction is similar. We suggest that an efficient giant impact requires to be head-on with high velocities, while in the hit-and-run case the impact can occur closer to the most probable collision angle (45 ∘ ). It is also shown that Mercury's current iron-to-rock ratio can be a result of multiple-collisions, with their exact number depending on the collision parameters. Mass loss is found to be more significant when the collisions are tight in time.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  20. #1310
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    https://arxiv.org/abs/1808.02090

    Tidal decay of circumbinary planetary systems

    Ivan I. Shevchenko
    (Submitted on 6 Aug 2018)

    It is shown that circumbinary planetary systems are subject to universal tidal decay (shrinkage of orbits), caused by the forced orbital eccentricity inherent to them. Circumbinary planets (CBP) are liberated from parent systems, when, owing to the shrinkage, they enter the circumbinary chaotic zone. On shorter timescales (less than the current age of the Universe), the effect may explain, at least partially, the observed lack of CBP of close-enough (with periods < 5 days) stellar binaries; on longer timescales (greater than the age of the Universe but well within stellar lifetimes), it may provide massive liberation of chemically evolved CBP. Observational signatures of the effect may comprise (1) a prevalence of large rocky planets (super-Earths) in the whole population of rogue planets (if this mechanism were the only source of rogue planets); (2) a mass-dependent paucity of CBP in systems of low-mass binaries: the lower the stellar mass, the greater the paucity.

    ===============================================

    UPDATED DATE:

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1711.04685

    Exocomets in the Proxima Centauri system and their importance for water transport

    Richard Schwarz, Akos Bazso, Nikolaos Georgakarakos, Birgit Loibnegger, David Bancelin, Elke Pilat-Lohinger, Kristina Kislyakova, Rudolf Dvorak, Thomas Maindl, Ian Dobbs-Dixon
    (Submitted on 13 Nov 2017 (v1), last revised 7 Aug 2018 (this version, v2))

    The scenario and efficiency of water transport by icy asteroids and comets are still amongst the most important unresolved questions of planetary systems. A better understanding of cometary dynamics in extrasolar systems shall provide information about cometary reservoirs and give an insight into water transport especially to planets in the habitable zone. The detection of Proxima Centauri-b (PCb), which moves in the habitable zone of this system, triggered a debate whether or not this planet can be habitable. In this work, we focus on the stability of an additional planet in the system and on water transport by minor bodies. We perform numerous N-body simulations with PCb and an outer Oort-cloud like reservoir of comets. We investigate close encounters and collisions with the planet, which are important for the transport of water. Observers found hints for a second planet with a period longer than 60 days. Our dynamical studies show that two planets in this system are stable even for a more massive second planet (~12 Earth masses). Furthermore, we perform simulations including exocomets, a second planet, and the influence of the binary Alpha Centauri. The studies on the dynamics of exocomets reveal that the outer limit for water transport is around 200 au. In addition we show that water transport would be possible from a close-in planetesimal cloud (1-4 au). From our simulations, based on typical M-star protoplanetary disks, we estimate the water mass delivered to the planets up to 51 Earth oceans.

    ===============================================

    Is it ever possible to have too much data? I don't think so, but...

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1804.10121

    Estimating distances from parallaxes IV: Distances to 1.33 billion stars in Gaia Data Release 2

    C.A.L. Bailer-Jones (MPIA), J. Rybizki (MPIA), M. Fouesneau (MPIA), G. Mantelet (ARI), R. Andrae (MPIA)
    (Submitted on 26 Apr 2018 (v1), last revised 7 Aug 2018 (this version, v2))

    For the vast majority of stars in the second Gaia data release, reliable distances cannot be obtained by inverting the parallax. A correct inference procedure must instead be used to account for the nonlinearity of the transformation and the asymmetry of the resulting probability distribution. Here we infer distances to essentially all 1.33 billion stars with parallaxes published in the second \gaia\ data release. This is done using a weak distance prior that varies smoothly as a function of Galactic longitude and latitude according to a Galaxy model. The irreducible uncertainty in the distance estimate is characterized by the lower and upper bounds of an asymmetric confidence interval. Although more precise distances can be estimated for a subset of the stars using additional data (such as photometry), our goal is to provide purely geometric distance estimates, independent of assumptions about the physical properties of, or interstellar extinction towards, individual stars. We analyse the characteristics of the catalogue and validate it using clusters.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  21. #1311
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    https://arxiv.org/pdf/1808.02073.pdf

    Gaia, Trumpler 16, and Eta Carina

    Gaia is telling us great things. In this case it looks like Eta Carina is further and brighter than we thought, but that some of the alleged members of its amazing cluster are not actually in the cluster.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  22. #1312
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    https://arxiv.org/abs/1712.00935

    Habitability in Brown Dwarf Systems

    Emeline Bolmont
    (Submitted on 4 Dec 2017)

    The very recent discovery of planets orbiting very low mass stars sheds light on these exotic objects. Planetary systems around low-mass stars and brown dwarfs are very different from our solar system: the planets are expected to be much closer than Mercury, in a layout that could resemble the system of Jupiter and its moons. The recent discoveries point in that direction with, for example, the system of Kepler-42 and especially the system of TRAPPIST-1 which has seven planets in a configuration very close to the moons of Jupiter. Low-mass stars and brown dwarfs are thought to be very common in our neighborhood and are thought to host many planetary systems. The planets orbiting in the habitable zone of brown dwarfs (and very low-mass stars) represent one of the next challenges of the following decades: they are the only planets of the habitable zone whose atmosphere we will be able to probe (e.g. with the JWST).

    ===========================================

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1712.02187

    The Chemical Composition of Mercury

    Larry R. Nittler, Nancy L. Chabot, Timothy L. Grove, Patrick N. Peplowski
    (Submitted on 6 Dec 2017)

    The chemical composition of a planetary body reflects its starting conditions modified by numerous processes during its formation and geological evolution. Measurements by X-ray, gamma-ray, and neutron spectrometers on the MESSENGER spacecraft revealed Mercury's surface to have surprisingly high abundances of the moderately volatile elements sodium, sulfur, potassium, chlorine, and thorium, and a low abundance of iron. This composition rules out some formation models for which high temperatures are expected to have strongly depleted volatiles and indicates that Mercury formed under conditions much more reducing than the other rocky planets of our Solar System. Through geochemical modeling and petrologic experiments, the planet's mantle and core compositions can be estimated from the surface composition and geophysical constraints. The bulk silicate composition of Mercury is likely similar to that of enstatite or metal-rich chondrite meteorites, and the planet's unusually large core is most likely Si rich, implying that in bulk Mercury is enriched in Fe and Si (and possibly S) relative to the other inner planets. The compositional data for Mercury acquired by MESSENGER will be crucial for quantitatively testing future models of the formation of Mercury and the Solar System as a whole, as well as for constraining the geological evolution of the innermost planet.

    =============================================

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1712.08234

    The Elusive Origin of Mercury

    Denton S. Ebel, Sarah T. Stewart
    (Submitted on 21 Dec 2017)

    The MESSENGER mission sought to discover what physical processes determined Mercury's high metal to silicate ratio. Instead, the mission has discovered multiple anomalous characteristics about our innermost planet. The lack of FeO and the reduced oxidation state of Mercury's crust and mantle are more extreme than nearly all other known materials in the solar system. In contrast, moderately volatile elements are present in abundances comparable to the other terrestrial planets. No single process during Mercury's formation is able to explain all of these observations. Here, we review the current ideas for the origin of Mercury's unique features. Gaps in understanding the innermost regions of the solar nebula limit testing different hypotheses. Even so, all proposed models are incomplete and need further development in order to unravel Mercury's remaining secrets.

    ==========================================

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1712.02730

    Terrestrial effects of moderately nearby supernovae

    Adrian L. Melott (Kansas), Brian C. Thomas (Washburn)
    (Submitted on 7 Dec 2017)

    Recent data indicate one or more moderately nearby supernovae in the early Pleistocene, with additional events likely in the Miocene. This has motivated more detailed computations, using new information about the nature of supernovae and the distances of these events to describe in more detail the sorts of effects that are indicated at the Earth. This short communication/review is designed to describe some of these effects so that they may possibly be related to changes in the biota around these times.

    ==========================================

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1712.09367

    Muon Radiation Dose and Marine Megafaunal Extinction at the end-Pliocene Supernova

    Adrian L. Melott (Kansas), Franciole Marinho, Laura Paulucci
    (Submitted on 26 Dec 2017)

    Considerable data and analysis support the detection of a supernova at a distance of about 50 pc, ~2.6 million years ago. This is possibly related to the extinction event around that time and is a member of a series of explosions which formed the Local Bubble in the interstellar medium. We build on the assumptions made in previous work, and propagate the muon flux from supernova-initiated cosmic rays from the surface to the depths of the ocean. We find that the radiation dose from the muons will exceed the total present surface dose from all sources at depths up to a kilometer and will persist for at least the lifetime of marine megafauna. It is reasonable to hypothesize that this increase in radiation load may have contributed to a newly documented marine megafaunal extinction at that time.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  23. #1313
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    More bad news about our friend, the Sun


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1712.02185

    The Effect of "Rogue" Active Regions on the Solar Cycle

    Melinda Nagy, Alexandre Lemerle, François Labonville, Kristóf Petrovay, Paul Charbonneau
    (Submitted on 6 Dec 2017)

    The origin of cycle-to-cycle variations in solar activity is currently the focus of much interest. It has recently been pointed out that large individual active regions with atypical properties can have a significant impact on the long term behaviour of solar activity. We investigate this possibility in more detail using a recently developed 2× 2D dynamo model of the solar magnetic cycle. We find that even a single "rogue" bipolar magnetic region (BMR) in the simulations can have a major effect on the further development of solar activity cycles, boosting or suppressing the amplitude of subsequent cycles. In extreme cases an individual BMR can completely halt the dynamo, triggering a grand minimum. Rogue BMRs also have the potential to induce significant hemispheric asymmetries in the solar cycle. To study the effect of rogue BMRs in a more systematic manner, a series of dynamo simulations were conducted, in which a large test BMR was manually introduced in the model at various phases of cycles of different amplitudes. BMRs emerging in the rising phase of a cycle can modify the amplitude of the ongoing cycle while BMRs emerging in later phases will only impact subsequent cycles. In this model, the strongest impact on the subsequent cycle occurs when the rogue BMR emerges around cycle maximum at low latitudes but the BMR does not need to be strictly cross-equatorial. Active regions emerging as far as 20 ∘ from the equator can still have a significant impact. We demonstrate that the combined effect of the magnetic flux, tilt angle and polarity separation of the BMR on the dynamo is via their contribution to the dipole moment, δD BMR . Our results indicate that prediction of the amplitude, starting epoch and duration of a cycle requires an accurate accounting of a broad range of active regions emerging in the previous cycle.

    =================================================

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1712.04701

    Reconnection fluxes in eruptive and confined flares and implications for superflares on the Sun

    Johannes Tschernitz, Astrid M. Veronig, Julia K. Thalmann, Jürgen Hinterreiter, Werner Pötzi
    (Submitted on 13 Dec 2017)

    We study the energy release process of a set of 51 flares (32 confined, 19 eruptive) ranging from GOES class B3 to X17. We use Hα filtergrams from Kanzelh"ohe Observatory together with SDO HMI and SOHO MDI magnetograms to derive magnetic reconnection fluxes and rates. The flare reconnection flux is strongly correlated with the peak of the GOES 1-8 \AA\ soft X-ray flux (c=0.92, in log-log space), both for confined and eruptive flares. Confined flares of a certain GOES class exhibit smaller ribbon areas but larger magnetic flux densities in the flare ribbons (by a factor of 2). In the largest events, up to ≈ 50\%\ of the magnetic flux of the active region (AR) causing the flare is involved in the flare magnetic reconnection. These findings allow us to extrapolate toward the largest solar flares possible. A complex solar AR hosting a magnetic flux of 2⋅10 23 Mx , which is in line with the largest AR fluxes directly measured, is capable of producing an X80 flare, which corresponds to a bolometric energy of about 7⋅10 32 ergs. Using a magnetic flux estimate of 6⋅10 23 Mx for the largest solar AR observed, we find that flares of GOES class ≈ X500 could be produced (E bol ≈3⋅10 33 ergs). These estimates suggest that the present day's Sun is capable of producing flares and related space weather events that may be more than an order of magnitude stronger than have been observed to date.

    ===============================================

    I'm just saying, if Pluto was still our ninth planet, we'd still be in the lead for number of planets.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1712.05044

    Identifying Exoplanets with Deep Learning: A Five Planet Resonant Chain around Kepler-80 and an Eighth Planet around Kepler-90

    Christopher J. Shallue, Andrew Vanderburg
    (Submitted on 13 Dec 2017)

    NASA's Kepler Space Telescope was designed to determine the frequency of Earth-sized planets orbiting Sun-like stars, but these planets are on the very edge of the mission's detection sensitivity. Accurately determining the occurrence rate of these planets will require automatically and accurately assessing the likelihood that individual candidates are indeed planets, even at low signal-to-noise ratios. We present a method for classifying potential planet signals using deep learning, a class of machine learning algorithms that have recently become state-of-the-art in a wide variety of tasks. We train a deep convolutional neural network to predict whether a given signal is a transiting exoplanet or a false positive caused by astrophysical or instrumental phenomena. Our model is highly effective at ranking individual candidates by the likelihood that they are indeed planets: 98.8% of the time it ranks plausible planet signals higher than false positive signals in our test set. We apply our model to a new set of candidate signals that we identified in a search of known Kepler multi-planet systems. We statistically validate two new planets that are identified with high confidence by our model. One of these planets is part of a five-planet resonant chain around Kepler-80, with an orbital period closely matching the prediction by three-body Laplace relations. The other planet orbits Kepler-90, a star which was previously known to host seven transiting planets. Our discovery of an eighth planet brings Kepler-90 into a tie with our Sun as the star known to host the most planets.

    ==============================================

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1712.05669

    The Pluto System After New Horizons

    S. Alan Stern. William Grundy, William B. McKinnon, Harold A. Weaver, Leslie A. Young
    (Submitted on 15 Dec 2017)

    The discovery of Pluto in 1930 presaged the discoveries of both the Kuiper Belt and ice dwarf planets, which are the third class of planets in our solar system. From the 1970s to the 19990s numerous fascinating attributes of the Pluto system were discovered, including multiple surface volatile species, Pluto's large satellite Charon, and its atmosphere. These attributes, and the 1990s discovery of the Kuiper Belt and Pluto's cohort of small Kuiper Belt planets, motivated the exploration of Pluto. That mission, called New Horizons (NH), revolutionized knowledge of Pluto and its system of satellites in 2015. Beyond providing rich geological, compositional, and atmospheric data sets, New Horizons demonstrated that Pluto itself has been surprisingly geologically active throughout the past 4 billion years, and that the planet exhibits a surprisingly complex range of atmospheric phenomenology and geologic expression that rival Mars in their richness.

    ================================================

    Offbeat topic, but relevant to astronomy teachers and communicators.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1712.08088

    How to Give a Great Talk

    Charles L. H. Hull
    (Submitted on 14 Dec 2017)

    The art of the scientific presentation -- much like the art of the perfect plot, the art of the compelling proposal, and the art of the killer job application -- is generally not something we're taught in school. Therefore, in classic Millennial style, one of the first things I did when I was asked to write this piece was to ask Google, "how to give a scientific presentation," to see what the Internet had to say. I've attempted to avoid boring you with laundry lists of "do's" and "don'ts," as many of the top Google hits did. However, I have incorporated a wide range of tips -- and some interesting vignettes -- both from the online hive mind and from my approximately eight years of regularly giving astronomy and radio-science presentations.
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2018-Aug-08 at 03:30 PM.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  24. #1314
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    Hmm...

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1712.08962

    Is the Young Star RZ Piscium Consuming Its Own (Planetary) Offspring?

    K. M. Punzi, J. H. Kastner, C. Melis, B. Zuckerman, C. Pilachowski, L. Gingerich, T. Knapp
    (Submitted on 24 Dec 2017)

    The erratically variable star RZ Piscium (RZ Psc) displays extreme optical dropout events and strikingly large excess infrared emission. To ascertain the evolutionary status of this intriguing star, we obtained observations of RZ Psc with the European Space Agency's X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission (XMM-Newton), as well as high-resolution optical spectroscopy with the Hamilton Echelle on the Lick Shane 3 m telescope and with HIRES on the Keck I 10 m telescope. The optical spectroscopy data demonstrate that RZ Psc is a pre-main sequence star with an effective temperature of 5600 ± 75 K and log g of 4.35 ± 0.10. The ratio of X-ray to bolometric luminosity, log L X /L bol , lies in the range -3.7 to -3.2, consistent with ratios typical of young, solar-mass stars, thereby providing strong support for the young star status of RZ Psc. The Li absorption line strength of RZ Psc suggests an age in the range 30-50 Myr, which in turn implies that RZ Psc lies at a distance of ∼ 170 pc. Adopting this estimated distance, we find the Galactic space velocity of RZ Psc to be similar to the space velocities of stars in young moving groups near the Sun. Optical spectral features indicative of activity and/or circumstellar material are present in our spectra over multiple epochs, which provide evidence for the presence of a significant mass of circumstellar gas associated with RZ Psc. We suggest that the destruction of one or more massive orbiting bodies has recently occurred within 1 au of the star, and we are viewing the aftermath of such an event along the plane of the orbiting debris.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  25. #1315
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    Quote Originally Posted by antoniseb View Post
    https://arxiv.org/pdf/1808.02073.pdf

    Gaia, Trumpler 16, and Eta Carina

    Gaia is telling us great things. In this case it looks like Eta Carina is further and brighter than we thought, but that some of the alleged members of its amazing cluster are not actually in the cluster.
    Me, an Eta Carina fan, and I missed this one. Thank you!
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  26. #1316
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    https://arxiv.org/abs/1808.02968

    Around the Pleiades

    Guillermo Abramson
    (Submitted on 8 Aug 2018)

    We present a calculation of the distance to the Pleiades star cluster based on data from Gaia DR2. We show that Gaia finally settles the discrepancy between the values derived from Hipparcos and other distance determinations. The technical level of the presentation is adequate for the interested layperson.

    ================================

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1808.03222

    Nucleosynthesis Constraints on the Explosion Mechanism for Type Ia Supernovae

    Kanji Mori, Michael A. Famiano, Tosh itaka Kajino, Toshio Suzuki, Peter M. Garnavich, Grant J. Mathews, Roland Diehl, Shing-Chi Leung, Ken'ichi Nomoto
    (Submitted on 9 Aug 2018)

    Observations of type Ia supernovae include information about the characteristic nucleosynthesis associated with these thermonuclear explosions. We consider observational constraints from iron-group elemental and isotopic ratios, to compare with various models obtained with the most-realistic recent treatment of electron captures. The nucleosynthesis is sensitive to the highest white-dwarf central densities. Hence, nucleosynthesis yields can distinguish high-density Chandrasekhar-mass models from lower-density burning models such as white-dwarf mergers. We discuss new results of post-processing nucleosynthesis for two spherical models (deflagration and/or delayed detonation models) based upon new electron capture rates. We also consider cylindrical and 3D explosion models (including deflagration, delayed-detonation, or a violent merger model). Although there are uncertainties in the observational constraints, we identify some trends in observations and the models. We {make a new comparison of the models with elemental and isotopic ratios from five observed supernovae and three supernova remnants. We find that the models and data tend to fall into two groups. In one group low-density cores such as in a 3D merger model are slightly more consistent with the nucleosynthesis data, while the other group is slightly better identified with higher-density cores such as in single-degenerate 1D-3D deflagration models. Hence, we postulate that both types of environments appear to contribute nearly equally to observed SNIa. We also note that observational constraints on the yields of 54Cr and 54Fe, if available, might be used as a means to clarify the degree of geometrical symmetry of SNIa explosions.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  27. #1317
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    https://arxiv.org/abs/1808.02168

    Rotationally induced failure of irregularly shaped asteroids

    Masatoshi Hirabayashi, Daniel J. Scheeres
    (Submitted on 7 Aug 2018)

    Many asteroids are rubble piles with irregular shapes. While the irregular shapes of large asteroids may be attributed to collisional events, those of small asteroids may result from not only impact events but also rotationally induced failure, a long-term consequence of small torques caused by, for example, solar radiation pressure. A better understanding of shape deformation induced by such small torques will allow us to give constraints on the evolution process of an asteroid and its structure. However, no quantitative study has been reported to provide the relationship between an asteroid's shape and its failure mode due to its fast rotation. Here, we use a finite element model (FEM) technique to analyze the failure modes and conditions of 24 asteroids with diameters less than 30 - 40 km, which were observed at high resolution by ground radar or asteroid exploration missions. Assuming that the material distribution is uniform, we investigate how these asteroids fail structurally at different spin rates. Our FEM simulations describe the detailed deformation mode of each irregularly shaped asteroid at fast spin. The failed regions depend on the original shape. Spheroidal objects structurally fail from the interior, while elongated objects experience structural failure on planes perpendicular to the minimum moment of inertia axes in the middle of their structure. Contact binary objects have structural failure across their most sensitive cross sections. We further investigate if our FEM analysis is consistent with earlier works that theoretically explored a uniformly rotating triaxial ellipsoid. The results show that global shape variations may significantly change the failure condition of an asteroid. Our work suggests that it is critical to take into account the actual shapes of asteroids to explore their failure modes in detail.

    ========================================

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1808.02889

    Multimessenger Astronomy and New Neutrino Physics

    Kevin J. Kelly, Pedro A. N. Machado
    (Submitted on 8 Aug 2018)

    We discuss how to constrain new physics in the neutrino sector using multimessenger astronomical observations by IceCube Generation 2. The information from time and direction coincidence with an identifiable source is used to improve the experimental sensitivity by constraining the mean free path of neutrinos from these sources. Over the coming years, IceCube Generation 2 is expected to detect neutrinos from tens of these sources. Here, we analyze the detection of neutron stars merging with black holes or neutron stars. We estimate the sensitivity to specific phenomenological models in upcoming years, including additional neutrino interactions, neutrinophilic dark matter, and lepton-number-charged axion dark matter.

    =======================================

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1808.03010

    The California-Kepler Survey. VI: Kepler Multis and Singles Have Similar Planet and Stellar Properties Indicating a Common Origin

    Lauren M. Weiss, Howard T. Isaacson, Geoffrey W. Marcy, Andrew W. Howard, Erik A. Petigura, Benjamin J. Fulton, Joshua N. Winn, Lea Hirsch, Evan Sinukoff, Jason F. Rowe
    (Submitted on 9 Aug 2018)

    The California-Kepler Survey (CKS) catalog contains precise stellar and planetary properties for the \Kepler\ planet candidates, including systems with multiple detected transiting planets ("multis") and systems with just one detected transiting planet ("singles," although additional planets could exist). We compared the stellar and planetary properties of the multis and singles in a homogenous subset of the full CKS-Gaia catalog. We found that sub-Neptune sized singles and multis do not differ in their stellar properties or planet radii. In particular: (1.) The distributions of stellar properties M⋆, [Fe/H], and vsini for the Kepler sub Neptune-sized singles and multis are statistically indistinguishable. (2.) The radius distributions of the sub-Neptune sized singles and multis with P>3 days are indistinguishable, and both have a valley at ~ 1.8 R⊕ . However, there are significantly more detected short-period (P<3 days), sub-Neptune sized singles than multis. The similarity of the host star properties, planet radii, and radius valley for singles and multis suggests a common origin. In particular, the similar radius valley, which is likely sculpted by photo-evaporation from the host star within the first 100 Myr, suggests that planets in both singles and multis spend much of the first 100 Myr near their present, close-in locations.

    ========================================

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1803.08510

    A Criterion for the Onset of Chaos in Systems of Two Eccentric Planets

    Sam Hadden, Yoram Lithwick
    (Submitted on 22 Mar 2018 (v1), last revised 9 Aug 2018 (this version, v2))

    We derive a criterion for the onset of chaos in systems consisting of two massive, eccentric, coplanar planets. Given the planets' masses and separation, the criterion predicts the critical eccentricity above which chaos is triggered. Chaos occurs where mean motion resonances overlap, as in Wisdom (1980)'s pioneering work. But whereas Wisdom considered only nearly circular planets, and hence examined only first order resonances, we extend his results to arbitrarily eccentric planets (up to crossing orbits) by examining resonances of all orders. We thereby arrive at a simple expression for the critical eccentricity. We do this first for a test particle in the presence of a planet, and then generalize to the case of two massive planets, based on a new approximation to the Hamiltonian (Hadden, in prep). We then confirm our results with detailed numerical simulations. Finally, we explore the extent to which chaotic two-planet systems eventually result in planetary collisions.

    =========================================

    Unhappy truths are told....

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1807.08769

    Outer Solar System Exploration: A Compelling and Unified Dual Mission Decadal Strategy for Exploring Uranus, Neptune, Triton, Dwarf Planets, and Small KBOs and Centaurs

    Amy A. Simon, S. Alan Stern, Mark Hofstadter
    (Submitted on 23 Jul 2018 (v1), last revised 8 Aug 2018 (this version, v2))

    Laying the Vision and Voyages (V&V, National Research Council 2011) Decadal Survey 2013-2022 objectives against subsequent budget profiles reveals that separate missions to every desirable target in the Solar System are simply not realistic. In fact, very few of these missions will be achievable under current budget realities. Given the cost and difficulty in reaching the outer Solar System, competition between high-value science missions to an Ice Giant system and the Kuiper Belt is counterproductive. A superior approach is to combine the two programs into an integrated strategy that maximizes the science that can be achieved across many science disciplines and communities, while recognizing pragmatic budget limitations.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  28. #1318
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    https://arxiv.org/abs/1808.02968

    Around the Pleiades

    Guillermo Abramson
    (Submitted on 8 Aug 2018)

    We present a calculation of the distance to the Pleiades star cluster based on data from Gaia DR2. We show that Gaia finally settles the discrepancy between the values derived from Hipparcos and other distance determinations. The technical level of the presentation is adequate for the interested layperson.
    I will cheat and give the answer:

    "The average parallax of this set is 7.34 mas, with a standard deviation of 0.45 mas. The Pleiades are so close that this deviation is not actually a measurement error, but rather a statistical characterization of the distribution of the stars of the cluster around its center. To obtain an estimation of the error we can use the errors of the individual measurements. Finally we get a value of 7:340:27 mas, which corresponds to a distance of 136.2 +/- 5.0 pc or 444 +/- 16 light years."
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  29. #1319
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    https://www.forbes.com/sites/davidbr.../#2dee18b7f495

    Forbes describes the "Blueberry Earth" thought experiment, which came out a lot more interesting than you'd think.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  30. #1320
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    https://arxiv.org/abs/1808.03637

    A kinematical age for the interstellar object 1I/'Oumuamua

    F. Almeida-Fernandes, H. J. Rocha-Pinto
    (Submitted on 10 Aug 2018)

    1I/'Oumuamua is the first interstellar object observed passing through the Solar System. Understanding the nature of these objects will provide crucial information about the formation and evolution of planetary systems, and the chemodynamical evolution of the Galaxy as a whole. We obtained the galactic orbital parameters of this object, considering 8 different models for the Galaxy, and compared it to those of stars of different ages from the Geneva-Copenhagen Survey (GCS). Assuming that the galactic orbital evolution of this object is similar to that of stars, we applied a Bayesian analyses and used the distribution of stellar velocities, as a function of age, to obtain a probability density function for the age of 'Oumuamua. We considered two models for the age-velocity dispersion relation (AVR): the traditional power law, fitted using data from the GCS; and a model that implements a second power law for younger ages, which we fitted using a sample of 153 Open Clusters (OCs). We find that the slope of the AVR is smaller for OCs than it is for field stars. Using these AVRs, we constrained an age range of 0.01-1.87 Gyr for 'Oumuamua and characterized a most likely age ranging between 0.20-0.45 Gyr, depending on the model used for the AVR. We also estimated the intrinsic uncertainties of the method due to not knowing the exact value of the Solar motion and the particularities of 1I/'Oumuamua's ejection.

    ===========================

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1808.03759

    Zodiacal Light Beyond Earth Orbit Observed with Pioneer 10

    T. Matsumoto, K. Tsumura, Y. Matsuoka, J. Pyo
    (Submitted on 11 Aug 2018)

    We reanalyze the Imaging Photopolarimeter data from Pioneer 10 to study the zodiacal light in the B and R bands beyond Earth orbit, applying an improved method to subtract integrated star light (ISL) and diffuse Galactic light (DGL). We found that there exists a significant instrumental offset, making it difficult to examine the absolute sky brightness. Instead, we analyzed the differential brightness, i.e., the difference in sky brightness from the average at high ecliptic latitude, and compared with that expected from the model zodiacal light. At a heliocentric distance of r<2 au, we found a fairly good correlation between the J-band model zodiacal light and the residual sky brightness after subtracting the ISL and DGL. The reflectances of the interplanetary dust derived from the correlation study are marginally consistent with previous works. The zodiacal light is not significantly detectable at r>3 au, as previously reported. However, a clear discrepancy from the model is found at r=2.94 au which indicates the existence of a local dust cloud produced by the collision of asteroids or dust trail from active asteroids (or main-belt comets). Our result confirms that the main component of the zodiacal light (smooth cloud) is consistent with the model even beyond the earth orbit, which justifies the detection of the extragalactic background light after subtracting the zodiacal light based on the model.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

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