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Thread: Fun Papers In Arxiv

  1. #1471
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    Now we have this business about the interstellar asteroid "speeding up" as it went through the solar system. Here's one possible reason as to why, if you don't assume that the aliens sped up their starship to get away from humans as fast as possible.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.11490

    Could Solar Radiation Pressure Explain 'Oumuamua's Peculiar Acceleration?

    Shmuel Bialy, Abraham Loeb (Submitted on 26 Oct 2018)

    'Oumuamua (1I/2017 U1) is the first object of interstellar origin observed in the Solar system. Recently, Micheli et al. (2018) reported that 'Oumuamua showed deviations from a Keplerian orbit at a high statistical significance. The observed trajectory is best explained by an excess radial acceleration Δa∝r −2 , where r is the distance of 'Oumuamua from the Sun. Such an acceleration is naturally expected for comets, driven by the evaporating material. However, recent observational and theoretical studies imply that 'Oumuamua is not an active comet. We explore the possibility that the excess acceleration results from Solar radiation pressure. The required mass-to-area ratio is m/A≈0.1 g cm −2 . For a thin sheet, this requires a width of w≈0.3−0.9 mm. We find that although extremely thin, such an object would survive an interstellar travel over Galactic distances of ∼5 kpc , withstanding collisions with gas and dust-grains as well as stresses from rotation and tidal forces. We discuss the possible origins of such an object.

    QUOTES: Recently, Micheli et al. (2018) reported the detection of non-gravitational acceleration in the motion of ’Oumuamua, at a statistical significance of 30s. Their best-fit to the data is obtained for a model with a non-constant excess acceleration which scales with distance from the Sun, r, ... but other power-law index values are also possible. They concluded that the observed acceleration is most likely the result of a cometary activity. Yet, despite its close Solar approach of r = 0:25 AU, ’Oumuamua shows no signs of any cometary activity, no cometary tail, nor gas emission/absorption lines were observed....
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  2. #1472
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    Moons with moons with moons with...


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.12687

    Climate modelling of hypothetical moon-moons in the Kepler-1625b system

    Duncan Forgan (Submitted on 30 Oct 2018)

    If the exomoon candidate orbiting Kepler-1625b truly exists, it is much more massive than the moons observed in the Solar system (Teachey et al. 2017; Teachey & Kipping 2018). This exomoon would be sufficiently large to stably host its own satellite. This has sparked discussion of a new category of celestial object - a moon-moon (Forgan 2018) or submoon (Kollmeier & Raymond 2018). In this Note, I describe initial results of climate modelling of a hypothetical moon-moon in the Kepler-1625b system, calculated using the OBERON code, which jointly computes 1D latitudinal energy balance models for individual worlds alongside the dynamical evolution of the system they inhabit (Forgan 2016a, DOI:10.5281/ZENODO.61236). Both the code and the parameter files used in these runs are available at github.com/dh4gan/oberon.

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    Did we miss what??? WHEN?

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.12766

    Have we missed an interstellar comet four years ago?

    Piotr A. Dybczyński, et al. (Submitted on 30 Oct 2018)

    New orbit for C/2014 W10 PANSTARRS is obtained. High original eccentricity of e = 1.65 might suggest an interstellar origin of this comet. The probable reasons for missing this possible important event is discussed and a call for searching potential additional observations in various archives is proposed.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  3. #1473
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    Best evidence so far that there really is a supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way. Does not bode well for Trantor [sf in-joke].


    https://phys.org/news/2018-10-materi...lack-hole.html

    Most detailed observations of material orbiting close to a black hole
    October 31, 2018, ESO

    ESO's exquisitely sensitive GRAVITY instrument has added further evidence to the long-standing assumption that a supermassive black hole lurks in the centre of the Milky Way. New observations show clumps of gas swirling around at about 30% of the speed of light on a circular orbit just outside its event horizon—the first time material has been observed orbiting close to the point of no return, and the most detailed observations yet of material orbiting this close to a black hole. ESO's GRAVITY instrument on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) Interferometer has been used by scientists from a consortium of European institutions, including ESO, to observe flares of infrared radiation coming from the accretion disc around Sagittarius A*, the massive object at the heart of the Milky Way. The observed flares provide long-awaited confirmation that the object in the centre of our galaxy is, as has long been assumed, a supermassive black hole. The flares originate from material orbiting very close to the black hole's event horizon—making these the most detailed observations yet of material orbiting this close to a black hole.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  4. #1474
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    The Milky Way was the product of a titanic merger between two pre-existing galaxies. I think we came out of it rather well, not strung all over the place like some colliding galaxies. Made the MW prettier. My only quibble with this paper is, I would have chosen a better and more "unused" name for the other galaxy, not the confusing appellation "Gaia-Enceladus" that makes me think "Earth-Saturn".


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1806.06038

    The merger that led to the formation of the Milky Way's inner stellar halo and thick disk

    Amina Helmi, et al. (Submitted on 15 Jun 2018 (v1), last revised 31 Oct 2018 (this version, v2))

    The assembly process of our Galaxy can be retrieved using the motions and chemistry of individual stars. Chemo-dynamical studies of the nearby halo have long hinted at the presence of multiple components such as streams, clumps, duality and correlations between the stars' chemical abundances and orbital parameters. More recently, the analysis of two large stellar surveys have revealed the presence of a well-populated chemical elemental abundance sequence, of two distinct sequences in the colour-magnitude diagram, and of a prominent slightly retrograde kinematic structure all in the nearby halo, which may trace an important accretion event experienced by the Galaxy. Here report an analysis of the kinematics, chemistry, age and spatial distribution of stars in a relatively large volume around the Sun that are mainly linked to two major Galactic components, the thick disk and the stellar halo. We demonstrate that the inner halo is dominated by debris from an object which at infall was slightly more massive than the Small Magellanic Cloud, and which we refer to as Gaia-Enceladus. The stars originating in Gaia-Enceladus cover nearly the full sky, their motions reveal the presence of streams and slightly retrograde and elongated trajectories. Hundreds of RR Lyrae stars and thirteen globular clusters following a consistent age-metallicity relation can be associated to Gaia-Enceladus on the basis of their orbits. With an estimated 4:1 mass-ratio, the merger with Gaia-Enceladus must have led to the dynamical heating of the precursor of the Galactic thick disk and therefore contributed to the formation of this component approximately 10 Gyr ago. These findings are in line with simulations of galaxy formation, which predict that the inner stellar halo should be dominated by debris from just a few massive progenitors.


    LATE NOTE: Warning that the paper is well color-illustrated and is an 8 MB large download. This discovery is the sort of thing possible ONLY with the ability to sort through and evaluate stupendous amounts of information, which will become apparent when you go through the text. Bless our spacecraft and supercomputers (and everyone who works with the same).
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2018-Nov-01 at 12:35 PM. Reason: add note
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  5. #1475
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    It seems this giant hot runaway star is the recent product of a merger between the stars in a binary system, which gifted the result with an ultrafast spin and a wild nebula around it. One of those papers that produces marvelous visual images as you read it, just putting together the pieces to get a beautiful picture of an awesome star.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.12916

    CPD-64 2731: a massive spun-up and rejuvenated high-velocity runaway star

    V.V. Gvaramadze, O.V. Maryeva, A.Y. Kniazev, D.B. Alexashov, N. Castro, N. Langer, I.Y. Katkov (Submitted on 30 Oct 2018)

    We report the results of our study of the high-velocity (~ 160 km/s) runaway O star CPD-64 2731 and its associated horseshoe-shaped nebula discovered with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer. Spectroscopic observations with the Southern African Large Telescope and spectral analysis indicate that CPD-64 2731 is a fast-rotating main-sequence O5.5 star with enhanced surface nitrogen abundance. We derive a projected rotational velocity of ~ 300 km/s which is extremely high for this spectral type. Its kinematic age of ~ 6 Myr, assuming it was born near the Galactic plane, exceeds its age derived from single star models by a factor of two. These properties suggest that CPD-64 2731 is a rejuvenated and spun-up binary product. The geometry of the nebula and the almost central location of the star within it argue against a pure bow shock interpretation for the nebula. Instead, we suggest that the binary interaction happened recently, thereby creating the nebula, with a cavity blown by the current fast stellar wind. This inference is supported by our results of 2D numerical hydrodynamic modelling.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  6. #1476
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    There seems to be a series of these "what was Oumuamua?" papers out. Interesting take, this one.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.00023

    Origin of 1I/'Oumuamua. II. An ejected exo-Oort cloud object?

    Amaya Moro-Martín (Submitted on 31 Oct 2018)

    1I/'Oumuamua is the first detected interstellar interloper. We test the hypothesis that it is representative of a background population of exo-Oort cloud objects ejected under the effect of post-main sequence mass loss and stellar encounters. We do this by comparing the cumulative number density of interstellar objects inferred from the detection of 1I/'Oumuamua to that expected from these two clearing processes. We consider the 0.08--8 M ⊙ mass range, take into account the dependencies with stellar mass, Galactocentric distance, and evolutionary state, and consider a wide range of size distributions for the ejected objects. Our conclusion is that 1I/'Oumuamua is likely not representative of this background population, strengthened by the consideration that our estimate is likely an overestimate because it assumes exo-Oort clouds are frequent but the parameter space to form them is actually quite restricted. We discuss whether the number density of free-floating, planetary-mass objects derived from gravitational microlensing surveys could be used as a discriminating measurement regarding 1I/'Oumuamua's origin (given their potential common origin). We conclude that this is challenged by the mass limitation of the surveys and the resulting uncertainty of the mass distribution. The detection of interlopers may be one of the few observational constraints of the low end of the mass distribution of free-floaters, with the caveat that, as we conclude here and in Moro-Mart\'ın (2018), it might not be appropriate to assume they are representative of an isotropic background population, which makes the derivation of a number density very challenging.

    ====================

    Overview of FRB research at present. 12 pages, includes brief history.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.00195

    A decade of fast radio bursts

    D.R. Lorimer (Submitted on 1 Nov 2018)

    Modern astrophysics is undergoing a revolution. As detector technology has advanced, and astronomers have been able to study the sky with finer temporal detail, a rich diversity of sources which vary on timescales from years down to a few nanoseconds has been found. Among these are Fast Radio Bursts, with pulses of millisecond duration and anomalously high dispersion compared to Galactic pulsars, first seen a decade ago. Since then, a new research community is actively working on a variety of experiments and developing models to explain this new phenomenon, and devising ways to use them as astrophysical tools. In this article, I describe how astronomers have reached this point, review the highlights from the first decade of research in this field, give some current breaking news, and look ahead to what might be expected in the next few years.


    And another FRB paper, 13 pages but wide margins, big type, double spaces.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.00360

    One or several populations of fast radio burst sources?

    M. Caleb, L. G. Spitler, B. W. Stappers (Submitted on 1 Nov 2018)

    To date, one repeating and many apparently non-repeating fast radio bursts have been detected. This dichotomy has driven discussions about whether fast radio bursts stem from a single population of sources or two or more different populations. Here we present the arguments for and against.

    ========================

    Escaped Trojans have a wild ride coming, all over the solar system.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.00352

    The dynamical evolution of escaped Jupiter Trojan asteroids, link to other minor body populations

    Romina P. Di Sisto, Ximena S. Ramos, Tabaré Gallardo (Submitted on 1 Nov 2018)

    Jupiter Trojan asteroids are located around L4 and L5 Lagrangian points on relatively stable orbits, in 1:1 MMR with Jupiter. However, not all of them lie in orbits that remain stable over the age of the Solar System. Unstable zones allow some Trojans to escape in time scales shorter than the Solar System age. This may contribute to populate other small body populations. In this paper, we study this process by performing long-term numerical simulations of the observed Trojans, focusing on the trajectories of those that leave the resonance. The orbits of current Trojans are taken as initial conditions and their evolution is followed under the gravitational action of the Sun and the planets. We find the rate of escape of Trojans from L5, ~1.1 times greater than from L4. The majority of escaped Trojans have encounters with Jupiter although they have encounters with the other planets too. Almost all escaped Trojans reach the comet zone, ~90% cross the Centaur zone and only L4 Trojans reach the transneptunian zone. Considering the real asymmetry between L4 and L5, we show that 18 L4 Trojans and 14 L5 Trojans with diameter D > 1 km are ejected from the resonance every Myr. The contribution of the escaped Trojans to other minor body populations would be negligible, being the contribution from L4 and L5 to JFCs and no-JFCs almost the same, and the L4 contribution to Centaurs and TNOs, orders of magnitude greater than that of L5. Considering the collisional removal, besides the dynamical one, and assuming that Trojans that escape due to collisions follow the same dynamical behavior that the ones removed by dynamics, we would have a minor contribution of Trojans to comets and Centaurs. However, there would be some specific regions were escaped Trojans could be important such as ACOs, Encke-type comets, S-L 9-type impacts on Jupiter and NEOs.

    ========================

    Rogue planets, everywhere you look.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.00441

    Two new free-floating planet candidates from microlensing

    P. Mroz, et al. (Submitted on 1 Nov 2018)

    Planet formation theories predict the existence of free-floating planets, ejected from their parent systems. Although they emit little or no light, they can be detected during gravitational microlensing events. Microlensing events caused by rogue planets are characterized by very short timescales t E (typically below two days) and small angular Einstein radii θ E (up to several uas). Here we present the discovery and characterization of two free-floating planet candidates identified in data from the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) survey. OGLE-2012-BLG-1323 is one of the shortest events discovered thus far (t E =0.155 +/- 0.005 d, θ E =2.37 +/- 0.10 uas) and was caused by an Earth-mass object in the Galactic disk or a Neptune-mass planet in the Galactic bulge. OGLE-2017-BLG-0560 (t E =0.905 +/- 0.005 d, θ E =38.7 +/- 1.6 uas) was caused by a Jupiter-mass planet in the Galactic disk or a brown dwarf in the bulge. We rule out stellar companions up to the distance of 6.0 and 3.9 au, respectively. We suggest that the lensing objects, whether located on very wide orbits or free-floating, may originate from the same physical mechanism. Although the sample of ultrashort microlensing events is small, these detections are consistent with low-mass wide-orbit or unbound planets being more common than stars in the Milky Way.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  7. #1477
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    Little stars with little metal in them. (The authors use the word "via" incorrectly, but everyone does.) I'm interested in low-mass stars and brown dwarfs out of curiosity, perhaps someone else is, too.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.00549

    An Ultra Metal-poor Star Near the Hydrogen-burning Limit

    Kevin C. Schlaufman, Ian B. Thompson, Andrew R. Casey (Submitted on 1 Nov 2018)

    It is unknown whether or not low-mass stars can form at low metallicity. While theoretical simulations of Population III (Pop III) star formation show that protostellar disks can fragment, it is impossible for those simulations to discern if those fragments survive as low-mass stars. We report the discovery of a low-mass star on a circular orbit with orbital period P = 34.757 +/- 0.010 days in the ultra metal-poor (UMP) single-lined spectroscopic binary system 2MASS J18082002--5104378. The secondary star 2MASS J18082002--5104378 B has a mass M_2 = 0.14_{-0.01}^{+0.06} M_Sun, placing it near the hydrogen-burning limit for its composition. The 2MASS J18082002--5104378 system is on a thin disk orbit as well, making it the most metal-poor thin disk star system by a considerable margin. The discovery of 2MASS J18082002--5104378 B confirms the existence of low-mass UMP stars and its short orbital period shows that fragmentation in metal-poor protostellar disks can lead to the formation and survival of low-mass stars. We use scaling relations for the typical fragment mass and migration time along with published models of protostellar disks around both UMP and primordial composition stars to explore the formation of low-mass Pop III stars via disk fragmentation. We find evidence that the survival of low-mass secondaries around solar-mass UMP primaries implies the survival of solar-mass secondary's around Pop III primaries with masses 10 M_Sun < M_Star < 100 M_Sun. If true, this inference suggests that solar-mass Pop III stars formed via disk fragmentation could survive to the present day.

    ==================

    We revisit the Big Blue Asteroid for a look at its distant past.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.00759

    What mechanisms dominate the activity of Geminid Parent (3200) Phaethon?

    LiangLiang Yu, Wing-Huen Ip, Tilman Spohn (Submitted on 2 Nov 2018)

    A long-term sublimation model to explain how Phaethon could provide the Geminid stream is proposed. We find that it would take ∼6 Myr or more for Phaethon to lose all of its internal ice (if ever there was) in its present orbit. Thus, if the asteroid moved from the region of a 5:2 or 8:3 mean motion resonance with Jupiter to its present orbit less than 1 Myr ago, it may have retained much of its primordial ice. The dust mantle on the sublimating body should have a thickness of at least 15 m but the mantle could have been less than 1 m thick 1000 years ago. We find that the total gas production rate could have been as large as 10 27 s −1 then, and the gas flow could have been capable of lifting dust particles of up to a few centimeters in size. Therefore, gas production during the past millennium could have been sufficient to blow away enough dust particles to explain the entire Geminid stream. For present-day Phaethon, the gas production is comparatively weak. But strong transient gas release with a rate of ∼4.5×10^19 m−2 s−1 is expected for its south polar region when Phaethon moves from 0 ∘ to 2 ∘ mean anomaly near perihelion. Consequently, dust particles with radii of <∼260 μm can be blown away to form a dust tail. In addition, we find that the large surface temperature variation of >600 K near perihelion can generate sufficiently large thermal stress to cause fracture of rocks or boulders and provide an efficient mechanism to produce dust particles on the surface. The time scale for this process should be several times longer than the seasonal thermal cycle, thereby dominating the cycle of appearance of the dust tail.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  8. #1478
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.00549

    An Ultra Metal-poor Star Near the Hydrogen-burning Limit
    News article today on the same double star. Extremely old.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  9. #1479
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    This is one of my hobby-horses, using mass and radius (or derivatives thereof) to classify planets. Will have to study this in detail later.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.02324

    Predicting Exoplanets Mass and Radius: A Nonparametric Approach

    Bo Ning, Angie Wolfgang, Sujit Ghosh (Submitted on 6 Nov 2018)

    A fundamental endeavor in exoplanetary research is to characterize the bulk compositions of planets via measurements of their masses and radii. With future sample sizes of hundreds of planets to come from TESS and PLATO, we develop a statistical method that can flexibly yet robustly characterize these compositions empirically, via the exoplanet M-R relation. Although the M-R relation has been explored in many prior works, they mostly use a power-law model, with assumptions that are not flexible enough to capture important features in current and future M-R diagrams. To address these shortcomings, a nonparametric approach is developed using a sequence of Bernstein polynomials. We demonstrate the benefit of taking the nonparametric approach by benchmarking our findings with previous work and showing that a power-law can only reasonably describe the M-R relation of the smallest planets and that the intrinsic scatter can change non-monotonically with different values of a radius. We then apply this method to a larger dataset, consisting of all the Kepler observations in the NASA Exoplanet Archive. Our nonparametric approach provides a tool to estimate the M-R relation by incorporating heteroskedastic measurement errors into the model. As more observations will be obtained in the near future, this approach can be used with the provided R code to analyze a larger dataset for a better understanding of the M-R relation.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  10. #1480
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    Are you a supernova fan? Type Ia's trip your trigger? Read on, this is your lucky day. The battery of related papers at the end are too many and too dense to talk about in detail, just click a link and enjoy.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1806.10001

    Late-time observations of the extraordinary Type II supernova iPTF14hls

    J. Sollerman, et al. (Submitted on 25 Jun 2018 (v1), last revised 6 Nov 2018 (this version, v2))

    We study iPTF14hls, a luminous and extraordinary long-lived Type II supernova, which lately has attracted much attention and disparate interpretation. We present new optical photometry that extends the light curves until more than 3 yr past discovery. We also obtained optical spectroscopy over this period, and furthermore present additional space-based observations using Swift and HST. After an almost constant luminosity for hundreds of days, the later light curve of iPTF14hls finally fades and then displays a dramatic drop after about 1000 d, but the supernova is still visible at the latest epochs presented. The spectra have finally turned nebular, and the very last optical spectrum likely displays signatures from the deep and dense interior of the explosion. The high-resolution HST image highlights the complex environment of the explosion in this low-luminosity galaxy. We provide a large number of additional late-time observations of iPTF14hls, which are (and will continue to be) used to assess the many different interpretations for this intriguing object. In particular, the very late (+1000 d) steep decline of the optical light curve, the lack of very strong X-ray emission, and the emergence of intermediate-width emission lines including of [S II] that likely originate from dense, processed material in the core of the supernova ejecta, are all key observational tests for existing and future models.

    ======

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.02374
    First Cosmology Results using Type Ia Supernovae from the Dark Energy Survey: Constraints on Cosmological Parameters

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.02376
    First Cosmological Results using Type Ia Supernovae from the Dark Energy Survey: Measurement of the Hubble Constant

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.02377
    First Cosmology Results Using Type Ia Supernovae From the Dark Energy Survey: Analysis, Systematic Uncertainties, and Validation

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.02378
    First Cosmology Results Using Type Ia Supernovae From the Dark Energy Survey: Photometric Pipeline and Light Curve Data Release

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.02379
    First Cosmology Results using Type Ia Supernova from the Dark Energy Survey: Simulations to Correct Supernova Distance Biases

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.02380
    First cosmology results using type Ia supernovae from the dark energy survey: Effects of chromatic corrections to supernova photometry on measurements of cosmological parameters
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  11. #1481
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    Always fond of dwarf planets. Good paper if you are into the topic.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.02677

    Ongoing Resurfacing of KBO Eris by Volatile Transport in Local, Collisional, Sublimation Atmosphere Regime

    Jason D. Hofgartner, Bonnie J. Buratti, Paul O. Hayne, Leslie A. Young (Submitted on 6 Nov 2018)

    Kuiper belt object (KBO) Eris is exceptionally bright with a greater visible geometric albedo than any other known KBO. Its infrared reflectance spectrum is dominated by methane, which should form tholins that darken the surface on timescales much shorter than the age of the Solar System. Thus one or more ongoing processes probably maintain its brightness. Eris is predicted to have a primarily nitrogen atmosphere that is in vapor pressure equilibrium with nitrogen-ice and is collisional (not ballistic). Eris's eccentric orbit is expected to result in two atmospheric regimes: (1) a period near perihelion when the atmosphere is global (analogous to the atmospheres of Mars, Triton, and Pluto) and (2) a period near aphelion when only a local atmosphere exists near the warmest region (analogous to the atmosphere of Io). A numerical model developed to simulate Eris's thermal and volatile evolution in the local atmosphere regime is presented. The model conserves energy, mass, and momentum while maintaining vapor pressure equilibrium. It is adaptable to other local, collisional, sublimation atmospheres, which in addition to Io and Eris, may occur on several volatile-bearing KBOs. The model was applied for a limiting case where Eris is fixed at aphelion and has an initial nitrogen-ice mass everywhere equal to the precipitable column of nitrogen in Pluto's atmosphere during the New Horizons encounter (the resultant mass if the Pluto atmosphere collapsed uniformly onto the surface). The model results indicate that (1) transport of nitrogen in the local, collisional, sublimation atmosphere regime is significant, (2) changes of Eris's albedo or color from nitrogen transport may be observable, and (3) uniform collapse of a global, nitrogen atmosphere likely cannot explain Eris's anomalous albedo in the present epoch. Seasonal volatile transport remains a plausible hypothesis to explain Eris's anomalous albedo and geologic processes that renew Pluto's brightest surfaces, such as convection and glaciation, may also be operating on Eris.

    ===============

    Interesting report on the Carrington superflare's effects on Earth. If it happens again, we'll be unhappy about it.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.02786

    Low-Latitude Aurorae during the Extreme Space Weather Events in 1859

    Hisashi Hayakawa, et al. (Submitted on 7 Nov 2018)

    The Carrington storm (September 1/2, 1859) is one of the largest magnetic storms ever observed and it has caused global auroral displays in low-latitude areas, together with a series of multiple magnetic storms during August 28 and September 4, 1859. In this study, we revisit contemporary auroral observation records to extract information on their elevation angle, color, and direction to investigate this stormy interval in detail. We first examine their equatorward boundary of "auroral emission with multiple colors" based on descriptions of elevation angle and color. We find that their locations were 36.5 deg ILAT on August 28/29 and 32.7 deg ILAT on September 1/2, suggesting that trapped electrons moved to, at least, L~1.55 and L~1.41, respectively. The equatorward boundary of "purely red emission" was likely located at 30.8 deg ILAT on September 1/2. If "purely red emission" was a stable auroral red arc, it would suggest that trapped protons moved to, at least, L~1.36. This reconstruction with observed auroral emission regions provides conservative estimations of magnetic storm intensities. We compare the auroral records with magnetic observations. We confirm that multiple magnetic storms occurred during this stormy interval, and that the equatorward expansion of the auroral oval is consistent with the timing of magnetic disturbances. It is possible that the August 28/29 interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) cleared out the interplanetary medium, making the ICMEs for the Carrington storm on September 1/2 more geoeffective.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  12. #1482
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    I wasn't aware we could do this. An example of the massive data mining going on now that Kepler has ended its work.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.03102

    An automated search for transiting exocomets

    Grant M. Kennedy, Greg Hope, Simon T. Hodgkin, Mark C. Wyatt (Submitted on 7 Nov 2018)

    This paper discusses an algorithm for detecting single transits in photometric time-series data. Specifically, we aim to identify asymmetric transits with ingress that is more rapid than egress, as expected for cometary bodies with a significant tail. The algorithm is automated, so can be applied to large samples and only a relatively small number of events need to be manually vetted. We applied this algorithm to all long cadence light curves from the Kepler mission, finding 16 candidate transits with significant asymmetry, 11 of which were found to be artefacts or symmetric transits after manual inspection. Of the 5 remaining events, four are the 0.1% depth events previously identified for KIC 3542116 and 11084727. We identify HD 182952 (KIC 8027456) as a third system showing a potential comet transit. All three stars showing these events have H-R diagram locations consistent with ∼100 Myr-old open cluster stars, as might be expected given that cometary source regions deplete with age, and giving credence to the comet hypothesis. If these events are part of the same population of events as seen for KIC 8462852, the small increase in detections at 0.1% depth compared to 10% depth suggests that future work should consider whether the distribution is naturally flat, or if comets with symmetric transits in this depth range remain undiscovered. Future searches relying on asymmetry should be more successful if they focus on larger samples and young stars, rather than digging further into the noise.

    ================

    Alas, poor SMC, we knew you well.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1804.04110

    The Proper Motion Field of the Small Magellanic Cloud: Kinematic Evidence for its Tidal Disruption

    Paul Zivick, et al. (Submitted on 11 Apr 2018 (v1), last revised 8 Nov 2018 (this version, v2))

    We present a new measurement of the systemic proper motion of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), based on an expanded set of 30 fields containing background quasars and spanning a ∼3 year baseline, using the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3. Combining this data with our previous 5 HST fields, and an additional 8 measurements from the Gaia-Tycho Astrometric Solution Catalog, brings us to a total of 43 SMC fields. We measure a systemic motion of μW = −0.82 ± 0.02 (random) ± 0.10 (systematic) mas yr−1 and μN = −1.21 ± 0.01 (random) ± 0.03 (systematic) mas yr−1. After subtraction of the systemic motion, we find little evidence for rotation, but find an ordered mean motion radially away from the SMC in the outer regions of the galaxy, indicating that the SMC is in the process of tidal disruption. We model the past interactions of the Clouds with each other based on the measured present-day relative velocity between them of 103 ± 26 km s−1. We find that in 97% of our considered cases, the Clouds experienced a direct collision 147 ± 33 Myr ago, with a mean impact parameter of 7.5 ± 2.5 kpc.

    ==================

    TESS is bangin' it. One of many planetary systems starting to appear in arXiv nowadays, no point in printing them all here. This one did look interesting, plus the star is named "pi".


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1809.07573

    TESS Discovery of a Transiting Super-Earth in the π Mensae System

    Chelsea X. Huang et al. (Submitted on 16 Sep 2018 (v1), last revised 8 Nov 2018 (this version, v2))

    We report the detection of a transiting planet around π Mensae (HD 39091), using data from the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS). The solar-type host star is unusually bright (V=5.7) and was already known to host a Jovian planet on a highly eccentric, 5.7-year orbit. The newly discovered planet has a size of 2.04 ± 0.05 R⊕ and an orbital period of 6.27 days. Radial-velocity data from the HARPS and AAT/UCLES archives also displays a 6.27-day periodicity, confirming the existence of the planet and leading to a mass determination of 4.82 ± 0.85 M⊕. The star's proximity and brightness will facilitate further investigations, such as atmospheric spectroscopy, asteroseismology, the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, astrometry, and direct imaging.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  13. #1483
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    If I got this right, an invisible mass of dark matter slammed into a star stream in the Milky Way galactic halo, and we know about it from the impact results of the part we CAN see. Okay, that's just flat-out cool.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.03631

    The Spur and the Gap in GD-1: Dynamical evidence for a dark substructure in the Milky Way halo

    Ana Bonaca, David W. Hogg, Adrian M. Price-Whelan, Charlie Conroy (Submitted on 8 Nov 2018)

    We present a model for the interaction of the GD-1 stellar stream with a massive perturber that naturally explains many of the observed stream features, including a gap and an off-stream spur of stars. The model involves an impulse by a fast encounter, after which the stream grows a loop of stars at different orbital energies. At specific viewing angles, this loop appears offset from the stream track. The configuration-space observations are sensitive to the mass, age, impact parameter, and total velocity of the encounter, and future velocity observations will constrain the full velocity vector of the perturber. A quantitative comparison of the spur and gap features prefers models where the perturber is in the mass range of 10^6 M⊙ to 10^8 M⊙. Orbit integrations back in time show that the stream encounter could not have been caused by any known globular cluster or dwarf galaxy, and mass, size and impact-parameter arguments show that it could not have been caused by a molecular cloud in the Milky Way disk. The most plausible explanation for the gap-and-spur structure is an encounter with a dark matter substructure, like those predicted to populate galactic halos in ΛCDM cosmology. However, the expected densities of ΛCDM subhalos in this mass range and in this part of the Milky Way are 2−3σ lower than the inferred high density of the GD-1 perturber. This observation opens up the possibility that detailed observations of streams could measure the mass spectrum of dark-matter substructures and even identify individual substructures and their orbits in the Galactic halo.

    QUOTE: GD-1 is the longest (> 100◦, 10kpc) thin (σ ≈ 120, 30pc) stellar stream discovered in the Galactic halo (Grillmair & Dionatos 2006).
    .
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2018-Nov-12 at 03:39 PM. Reason: add info
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  14. #1484
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    Had not considered what might have happened to the moons of the gas giants when they migrated inward. Guess the trip wasn't pleasant for them.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.04870

    Impact bombardment on the regular satellites of Jupiter and Uranus during an episode of giant planet migration

    E. W. Wong, R. Brasser, S. C. Werner (Submitted on 12 Nov 2018)

    The intensity and effects of early impact bombardment on the major satellites of the giant planets during an episode of giant planet migration is still poorly known. We use a combination of dynamical N-body and Monte Carlo simulations to determine impact probabilities, impact velocities, and expected masses that collide with these satellites to determine the chronology of impacts during the migration. Volatile loss through bombardment is typically 20% for Miranda, a few percents for the larger Uranian satellites and negligible for the Galilean satellites. Due to its small size and the high impact velocity there is a >99% chance that Miranda suffered a catastrophic impact that shattered the satellite. Subsequent re-accretion from a circum-Uranian ring could account for its peculiar surface morphology and low density. The probability to destroy Ariel and Umbriel is 15% and 1% for Titania and Oberon. Approximately 90% of the mass in planetesimals that passes through the Jovian and Uranian satellite systems (about 4 M⊕ and 2 M⊕ respectively) does so in about 15 Myr. This extremely rapid and intense bombardment causes repeated local crustal melting on all satellites. The combination of these effects results in an entirely different impact chronology than that of the inner solar system. We conclude that the simple extrapolation of the lunar chronology to the outer solar system satellites is not correct. The tail end (after 25 Myr) of the chronology function has an e-folding time of 100 Myr at Jupiter, but follows a cumulative Weibull distribution at Uranus, making direct comparisons between the gas and ice giant planets difficult. Based on our results the surfaces of the Uranian satellites, Callisto, and possibly Ganymede, are all about the same age, and are roughly 150 Myr younger than the timing of the dynamical instability.

    ============

    A new member of the Local Group, a big one, but a light one (light on dark matter). Something interesting in a very dull part of the sky.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.04082

    The hidden giant: discovery of an enormous Galactic dwarf satellite in Gaia DR2

    G. Torrealba, et al. (Submitted on 9 Nov 2018)

    We report the discovery of a Milky-Way satellite in the constellation of Antlia. The Antlia 2 dwarf galaxy is located behind the Galactic disc at a latitude of b∼11∘ and spans 1.26 degrees, which corresponds to ∼2.9 kpc at its distance of 130 kpc. While similar in extent to the Large Magellanic Cloud, Antlia~2 is orders of magnitude fainter with MV = −8.5 mag, making it by far the lowest surface brightness system known (at 32.3 mag/arcsec^2), ∼100 times more diffuse than the so-called ultra diffuse galaxies. The satellite was identified using a combination of astrometry, photometry and variability data from Gaia Data Release 2, and its nature confirmed with deep archival DECam imaging, which revealed a conspicuous BHB signal in agreement with distance obtained from Gaia RR Lyrae. We have also obtained follow-up spectroscopy using AAOmega on the AAT to measure the dwarf's systemic velocity, 290.9±0.5 km/s, its velocity dispersion, 5.7±1.1 km/s, and mean metallicity, [Fe/H] = −1.4. From these properties we conclude that Antlia 2 inhabits one of the least dense Dark Matter (DM) halos probed to date. Dynamical modelling and tidal-disruption simulations suggest that a combination of a cored DM profile and strong tidal stripping may explain the observed properties of this satellite. The origin of this core may be consistent with aggressive feedback, or may even require alternatives to cold dark matter (such as ultra-light bosons).
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  15. #1485
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.03631

    The Spur and the Gap in GD-1: Dynamical evidence for a dark substructure in the Milky Way halo.
    Looks like I missed the part about the "dark matter hurricane" coming through our solar system. Might have some scientific benefits, hard to say.

    https://phys.org/news/2018-11-dark-h...ce-axions.html
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  16. #1486
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    Couldn't very well pass this one up, given that it defines masses for two major solar-system areas.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.05191

    Masses of the Main Asteroid Belt and the Kuiper Belt from the Motions of Planets and Spacecraft

    E. V. Pitjeva, N. P. Pitjev (Submitted on 13 Nov 2018)

    Dynamical mass estimates for the main asteroid belt and the trans-Neptunian Kuiper belt have been found from their gravitational influence on the motion of planets. Discrete rotating models consisting of moving material points have been used to model the total attraction from small or as yet undetected bodies of the belts. The masses of the model belts have been included in the set of parameters being refined and determined and have been obtained by processing more than 800 thousand modern positional observations of planets and spacecraft. We have processed the observations and determined the parameters based on the new EPM2017 version of the IAA RAS planetary ephemerides. The large observed radial extent of the belts (more than 1.2 au for the main belt and more than 8 au for the Kuiper belt) and the concentration of bodies in the Kuiper belt at a distance of about 44 au found from observations have been taken into account in the discrete models. We have also used individual mass estimates for large bodies of the belts as well as for objects that spacecraft have approached and for bodies with satellites. Our mass estimate for the main asteroid belt is (4.008±0.029)⋅10^−4 m⊕ (3σ). The bulk of the Kuiper belt objects are in the ring zone from 39.4 to 47.8 AU. The estimate of its total mass together with the mass of the 31 largest trans-Neptunian Kuiper belt objects is (1.97±0.030)⋅10^−2 m⊕ (3σ), which exceeds the mass of the main asteroid belt almost by a factor of 50. The mass of the 31 largest trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) is only about 40% of the total one.

    ================

    Previously released, now revised. I remain intrigued by brown dwarfs and just how they can exceed the 70-80 Jovian mass limit without turning into stars.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1805.12143

    On the existence of brown dwarfs more massive than the hydrogen burning limit

    John C. Forbes, Abraham Loeb (Submitted on 30 May 2018 (v1), last revised 12 Nov 2018 (this version, v2))

    Almost by definition brown dwarfs are objects with masses below the hydrogen burning limit, around 0.07 M⊙. Below this mass, objects never reach a steady state where they can fuse hydrogen. Here we demonstrate, in contrast to this traditional view, that brown dwarfs with masses greater than the hydrogen burning limit may in principle exist in the universe. These objects, which we term "overmassive brown dwarfs" form a continuous sequence with traditional brown dwarfs in any property (mass, effective temperature, radius, luminosity). To form an overmassive brown dwarf, mass must be added sufficiently slowly to a sufficiently old traditional brown dwarf below the hydrogen burning limit. We identify mass transfer in binary brown dwarf systems via Roche lobe overflow driven by gravitational waves to be the most plausible mechanism to produce the bulk of the putative overmassive brown dwarf population.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  17. #1487
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    Another paper on the dwarf galaxies that are satellites of the Milky Way -- but this paper tells how the little galaxies orbit us!


    https://phys.org/news/2018-11-small-galaxies-milky.html

    The dance of the small galaxies that surround the Milky Way

    November 14, 2018, Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias

    An international team led by researchers from the IAC used data from the ESA satellite Gaia to measure the motion of 39 dwarf galaxies. This data gives information on the dynamics of these galaxies, their histories and their interactions with the Milky Way. Around the Milky Way, there are many small galaxies (dwarf galaxies), which can be tens of thousands of times or even millions of times less luminous than the Milky Way. In comparison with normal or giant galaxies, dwarf galaxies contain fewer stars and have lower luminosity.

    These small galaxies have been the subject of the study of an international team of astronomers led by Tobias K. Fritz and Giuseppina Battaglia, both researchers of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC). Thanks to the data acquired by the ESA Gaia space mission, which became available in a second release in April 2018, the researchers have been able to measure the on-sky motion of 39 dwarf galaxies, determining direction and velocity.

    Research paper: http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018arXiv180500908F
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  18. #1488
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    Massive star orbited by neutron star = gamma-ray binary, major discovery coolness. Never heard of this before.


    https://phys.org/news/2018-11-astron...amma-rays.html

    Astronomers detect once-in-a-lifetime gamma rays

    November 14, 2018 by Karen B. Roberts, University of Delaware

    In a cluster of some of the most massive and luminous stars in our galaxy, about 5,000 light years from Earth, astronomers detected particles being accelerated by a rapidly rotating neutron star as it passed by the massive star it orbits only once every 50 years. The discovery is extremely rare, according to University of Delaware astrophysicist Jamie Holder and doctoral student Tyler Williamson, who were part of the international team that documented the occurrence. Holder called this eccentric pair of gravitationally linked stars a "gamma-ray binary system" and likened the once-in-a-lifetime event to the arrival of Halley's comet or last year's U.S. solar eclipse.

    Massive stars are among the brightest stars in our galaxy. Neutron stars are extremely dense and energetic stars that result when a massive star explodes. This binary system is a massive star with a neutron star orbiting around it. Of the 100 billion stars in our galaxy, less than 10 are known to be this type of system. Even fewer—only two systems, including this one—are known to have an identified neutron star, or pulsar, that emits pulses of radio waves that scientists can measure. This is important because it tells astronomers very accurately how much energy is available to accelerate particles, something scientists know little about.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  19. #1489
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    Two neutron stars just merged into one supermassive one, and it was detected by gravitational waves.


    https://phys.org/news/2018-11-gravit...tron-star.html

    Gravitational waves from a merged hyper-massive neutron star

    November 14, 2018, Royal Astronomical Society

    For the first time astronomers have detected gravitational waves from a merged, hyper-massive neutron star. The scientists, Maurice van Putten of Sejong University in South Korea, and Massimo della Valle of the Osservatorio Astronomico de Capodimonte in Italy, publish their results in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters.

    The initial observations of GW170817 suggested that the two neutron stars merged into a black hole, an object with a gravitational field so powerful that not even light can travel quickly enough to escape its grasp. Van Putten and della Valle set out to check this, using a novel technique to analyse the data from LIGO and the Virgo gravitational wave detector sited in Italy. Their detailed analysis shows the H1 and L1 detectors in LIGO, which are separated by more than 3,000 kilometres, simultaneously picked up a descending 'chirp' lasting around 5 seconds. Significantly, this chirp started between the end of the initial burst of gravitational waves and a subsequent burst of gamma rays. Its low frequency (less than 1 KHz, reducing to 49 Hz) suggests the merged object spun down to instead become a larger neutron star, rather than a black hole.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  20. #1490
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    TESS is kickin' it. WASP-18b is a super-Jovian just under the brown-dwarf limit at 10+ Jupiter masses, period under a day, ultra-hot. Is there anything TESS cannot do?


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.06020

    TESS full orbital phase curve of the WASP-18b system

    Avi Shporer, et al. (Submitted on 14 Nov 2018)

    We present the full visible-light orbital phase curve of the transiting planet WASP-18b measured by the TESS Mission. The phase curve includes the transit, secondary eclipse, and sinusoidal modulations across the orbital phase shaped by the planet's atmospheric characteristics and the star-planet gravitational interaction. We measure the beaming (Doppler boosting) and tidal ellipsoidal distortion phase modulations and show that the amplitudes of both agree with theoretical expectations. We find that the light from the planet's day side occulted during secondary eclipse, with a relative brightness of 355 ± 21 ppm, is dominated by thermal emission, leading to an upper limit on the geometric albedo in the TESS band of 0.057 (2 σ). We also detect the phase modulation due to the planet's atmosphere longitudinal brightness distribution. We find that its maximum is well-aligned with the sub-stellar point, and we place an upper limit on the phase shift of 3.5 deg (2 σ). Finally, we do not detect light from the planet's night-side hemisphere, with an upper limit of 53 ppm (2 σ), which is 15% of the day-side brightness. The low albedo, lack of atmospheric phase shift, and inefficient heat distribution from the day to night hemispheres that we deduce from our analysis are consistent with theoretical expectations and similar findings for other strongly irradiated gas giant planets. This work demonstrates the potential of TESS data for studying full orbital phase curves of transiting systems.

    ====================

    More on WASP-18b, to my surprise.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.06527

    The polarization of the planet-hosting WASP-18 system

    Kimberly Bott, et al. (Submitted on 15 Nov 2018)

    We report observations of the linear polarization of the WASP-18 system, which harbors a very massive (approx 10 M_J) planet orbiting very close to its star with an orbital period of 0.94 days. We find the WASP-18 system is polarized at about 200 parts-per-million (ppm), likely from the interstellar medium predominantly, with no strong evidence for phase dependent modulation from reflected light from the planet. We set an upper limit of 40 ppm (99% confidence level) on the amplitude of a reflected polarized light planetary signal. We compare the results with models for a number of processes that may produce polarized light in a planetary system to determine if we can rule out any phenomena with this limit. Models of reflected light from thick clouds can approach or exceed this limit, but such clouds are unlikely at the high temperature of the WASP-18b atmosphere. Additionally, we model the expected polarization resulting from the transit of the planet across the star and find this has an amplitude of about 1.6 ppm, which is well below our detection limits. We also model the polarization due to the tidal distortion of the star by the massive planet and find this is also too small to be measured currently.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  21. #1491
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    A supernova progenitor has been discovered for Type Ic!


    https://phys.org/news/2018-11-astron...supernova.html

    Astronomers find possible elusive star behind supernova

    November 15, 2018, W. M. Keck Observatory

    Astronomers may have finally uncovered the long-sought progenitor to a specific type of exploding star by sifting through NASA Hubble Space Telescope archival data and conducting follow-up observations using W. M. Keck Observatory in Hawaii. The supernova, known as a type Ic, is thought to detonate after a massive star has shed or been stripped of its outer layers of hydrogen and helium.

    These stars are among the most massive known—at least 30 times more massive than our own Sun. Even after shedding some of their material late in life, they remain very large and bright. So it was a mystery as to why astronomers had not been able to nab one of these stars in pre-explosion images.

    Finally, in 2017, astronomers got lucky. A nearby star ended its life as a type Ic supernova. Two teams of astronomers pored through the archive of Hubble images to uncover the presumed precursor star in pre-explosion photos taken in 2007. The supernova, catalogued as SN 2017ein, appeared near the center of the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 3938, located roughly 65 million light-years away. This discovery could yield important insights into stellar evolution, including how the masses of stars are distributed when they are born in batches.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  22. #1492
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    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.06594

    Searching for the Origin of Flares in M dwarfs

    Lauren Doyle, Gavin Ramsay, John G. Doyle (Submitted on 15 Nov 2018)

    We present an overview of K2 short cadence observations for 34 M dwarfs observed in Campaigns 1 - 9 which have spectral types between M0 - L1. All of the stars in our sample showed flares with the most energetic reaching 3 × 10^34 ergs. As previous studies have found, we find rapidly rotating stars tend to show more flares, with evidence for a decline in activity in stars with rotation periods longer than approximately 10 days. We determined the rotational phase of each flare and performed a simple statistical test on our sample to determine whether the phase distribution of the flares is random or if there is a preference for phase. We find, with the exception of one star which is in a known binary system, that none show a preference for the rotational phase of the flares. This is unexpected and all stars in our sample show flares at all rotational phases, suggesting these flares are not all originating from one dominant starspot on the surface of the stars. We outline three scenarios which could explain the lack of a correlation between the number of flares and the stellar rotation phase. In addition we also highlight preliminary observations of DP Cnc, observed in campaigns 16 and 18, and is one of the stars in our extended sample from K2 Campaigns 10 -18 which are still to be examined.

    =========

    Supernovae remain as confusing as ever.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.07127

    Observational Predictions for Sub-Chandrasekhar Mass Explosions: Further Evidence for Multiple Progenitor Systems for Type Ia Supernovae

    Abigail Polin, Peter Nugent, Daniel Kasen (Submitted on 17 Nov 2018)

    We present a numerical parameter survey of 1-D sub-Chandrasekhar mass white dwarf explosions. Carbon-oxygen white dwarfs accreting a helium shell have the potential to explode in the sub-Chandrasekhar mass regime. Previous studies have shown how the ignition of a helium shell can either directly ignite the white dwarf at the core-shell interface or propagate a shock wave into the center of the core causing a shock driven central ignition. We examine the explosions of white dwarfs from 0.6 - 1.2 M⊙ with Helium shells of 0.01 M⊙, 0.05 M⊙ and 0.08 M⊙. Distinct observational signatures of sub-Chandrasekhar mass white dwarf explosions are predicted for two categories of shell size. Thicker-shell models show an excess of flux combined with red colors for the first few days after explosion. The flux excess is caused by the presence of radioactive material in the ashes of the helium shell, and the red colors are due to these ashes creating significant line blanketing in the UV through the blue portion of the spectrum. Models with thin helium shells reproduce several typical Type Ia supernova signatures. We identify a relationship between Si II velocity and luminosity which, for the first time, identifies a sub-class of observed supernovae that are consistent with these models. This sub-class is further delineated by the absence of carbon in their atmospheres. Finally, we suggest that the proposed difference in the ratio of selective to total extinction between the high velocity and normal velocity Type Ia supernovae is not due to differences in the properties of the dust around these events, but is rather an artifact of applying a single extinction correction to two populations of supernovae which likely have different intrinsic colors.

    ===========

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.07135

    An orbital window into the ancient Sun's mass

    Christopher Spalding, Woodward W. Fischer, Gregory Laughlin (Submitted on 17 Nov 2018)

    Models of the Sun's long-term evolution suggest that its luminosity was substantially reduced 2-4 billion years ago, which is inconsistent with substantial evidence for warm and wet conditions in the geological records of both ancient Earth and Mars. Typical solutions to this so-called "faint young Sun paradox" consider changes in the atmospheric composition of Earth and Mars, and while attractive, geological verification of these ideas is generally lacking-particularly for Mars. One possible underexplored solution to the faint young Sun paradox is that the Sun has simply lost a few percent of its mass during its lifetime. If correct, this would slow, or potentially even offset the increase in luminosity expected from a constant-mass model. However, this hypothesis is challenging to test. Here, we propose a novel observational proxy of the Sun's ancient mass that may be readily measured from accumulation patterns in sedimentary rocks on Earth and Mars. We show that the orbital parameters of the Solar system planets undergo quasi-cyclic oscillations at a frequency, given by secular mode g_2-g_5, that scales approximately linearly with the Sun's mass. Thus by examining the cadence of sediment accumulation in ancient basins, it is possible distinguish between the cases of a constant mass Sun and a more massive ancient Sun to a precision of greater than about 1 per cent. This approach provides an avenue toward verification, or of falsification, of the massive early Sun hypothesis.

    =============

    Three million years later, it returns.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.07180

    Distant Comet C/2017 K2 and the Cohesion Bottleneck

    David Jewitt, Jessica Agarwal, Man-To Hui, Jing Li, Max Mutchler, Harold Weaver (Submitted on 17 Nov 2018)

    Distant long-period comet C/2017 K2 has been outside the planetary region of the solar system for 3 Myr, negating the possibility that heat retained from the previous perihelion could be responsible for its activity. This inbound comet is also too cold for water ice to sublimate and too cold for amorphous water ice, if present, to crystallize. C/2017 K2 thus presents an ideal target in which to investigate the mechanisms responsible for activity in distant comets. We have used Hubble Space Telescope to study the comet in the pre-perihelion distance range 13.8 to 15.9 AU. The coma maintains a logarithmic surface brightness gradient m = −1.010 ± 0.004, consistent with steady-state mass loss. The absence of a radiation pressure swept tail indicates that the effective particle size is large (0.1 mm) and the mass loss rate is ∼200 kg s−1, remarkable for a comet still beyond the orbit of Saturn. Extrapolation of the photometry indicates that activity began in 2012.1, at 25.9 ± 0.9 AU, where the blackbody temperature is only 55 K. This large distance and low temperature suggest that cometary activity is driven by the sublimation of a super-volatile ice (e.g.~CO), presumably preserved by K2's long-term residence in the Oort cloud. The mass loss rate can be sustained by CO sublimation from an area ≲ 2 km^2, if located near the hot sub-solar point on the nucleus. However, while the drag force from sublimated CO is sufficient to lift millimeter sized particles against the gravity of the cometary nucleus, it is 10^2 to 10^3 times too small to eject these particles against inter-particle cohesion. Our observations thus require either a new understanding of the physics of inter-particle cohesion or the introduction of another mechanism to drive distant cometary mass loss. We suggest thermal fracture and electrostatic supercharging in this context.

    ============

    Must have been interesting when this was a triple-red-giant system.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.07752

    Discovery of the first resolved triple white dwarf

    M. Perpinyà-Vallès, et al. (Submitted on 19 Nov 2018)

    We report the discovery of J1953-1019, the first resolved triple white dwarf system. The triplet consists of an inner white dwarf binary and a wider companion. Using Gaia DR2 photometry and astrometry combined with our follow-up spectroscopy, we derive effective temperatures, surface gravities, masses and cooling ages of the three components. All three white dwarfs have pure-hydrogen (DA) atmospheres, masses of 0.60-0.63 Msun and cooling ages of 40-290 Myr. We adopt eight initial-to-final mass relations to estimate the main sequence progenitor masses (which we find to be similar for the three components, 1.6-2.6 Msun) and lifetimes. The differences between the derived cooling times and main sequence lifetimes agree for most of the adopted initial-to-final mass relations, hence the three white dwarfs in J1953-1019 are consistent with coeval evolution. Furthermore, we calculate the projected orbital separations of the inner white dwarf binary (303.25 +- 0.01 au) and of the centre of mass of the inner binary and the outer companion (6398.97 +- 0.09 au). From these values, and taking into account a wide range of possible configurations for the triplet to be currently dynamically stable, we analyse the future evolution of the system. We find that a collision between the two inner white dwarfs due to Lidov-Kozai oscillations is unlikely, though if it occurs it could result in a sub-Chandrasekhar Type Ia supernova explosion.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  23. #1493
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    The Rolling Stones, live on Phobos! So to speak. Can't believe something with so low a gravity has boulders rolling across it.

    https://phys.org/news/2018-11-mars-m...es-stones.html

    Mars moon got its grooves from rolling stones, study suggests
    November 20, 2018, Brown University

    A new study bolsters the idea that strange grooves crisscrossing the surface of the Martian moon Phobos were made by rolling boulders blasted free from an ancient asteroid impact. The research, published in Planetary and Space Science, uses computer models to simulate the movement of debris from Stickney crater, a huge gash on one end of Phobos' oblong body. The models show that boulders rolling across the surface in the aftermath of the Stickney impact could have created the puzzling patterns of grooves seen on Phobos today.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  24. #1494
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    Where's the mass? Answers some questions I didn't know I had.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.07916

    Excitation and depletion of the asteroid belt in the early instability scenario

    Matthew S. Clement, Sean N. Raymond, Nathan A. Kaib (Submitted on 19 Nov 2018)

    Containing only a few percent the mass of the moon, the current asteroid belt is around three to four orders of magnitude smaller that its primordial mass inferred from disk models. Yet dynamical studies have shown that the asteroid belt could not have been depleted by more than about an order of magnitude over the past ~4 Gyr. The remainder of the mass loss must have taken place during an earlier phase of the solar system's evolution. An orbital instability in the outer solar system occurring during the process of terrestrial planet formation can reproduce the broad characteristics of the inner solar system. Here, we test the viability of this model within the constraints of the main belt's low present-day mass and orbital structure. While previous studies modeled asteroids as massless test particles because of limited computing power, our work uses GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) acceleration to model a fully self-gravitating asteroid belt. We find that depletion in the main belt is related to the giant planets' exact evolution within the orbital instability. Simulations that produce the closest matches to the giant planets' current orbits deplete the main belt by two to three orders of magnitude. These simulated asteroid belts are also good matches to the actual asteroid belt in terms of their radial mixing and broad orbital structure.

    =========

    This explains a lot. I had wondered if there was more than one way to produce Earthlike planets, and perhaps there is.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.07919

    Two Terrestrial Planet Families With Different Origins

    Mark Swain, Raissa Estrela, Christophe Sotin, Gael Roudier, Robert Zellem (Submitted on 19 Nov 2018)

    The important role of stellar irradiation in envelope removal for planets with diameters of ⪅ 2 R-Earth has been inferred both through theoretical work and the observed bimodal distribution of small planet occurrence as a function of radius. We examined the trends for small planets in the three-dimensional radius-insolation-density space and find that the terrestrial planets divide into two distinct families, one of which merges with terrestrial planets and small bodies in the solar system and is thus Earth-like. The other terrestrial planet family forms a bulk-density continuum with the sub-Neptunes, and is thus likely to be composed of remnant cores produced by photoevaporation. Based on the density-radius relationships, we suggest that both terrestrial families show evidence of density enhancement through collisions. Our findings highlight the important role that both photoevaporation and collisions have in determining the density of small planets.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  25. #1495
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    Planetary magnetic fields generated by... magma oceans. Well, okay, I can see that.


    https://phys.org/news/2018-11-planet...ings-life.html

    What magnetic fields can tell us about life on other planets
    November 21, 2018 by Robert Sanders, University of California - Berkeley

    Every school kid knows that Earth has a magnetic field – it's what makes compasses align north-south and lets us navigate the oceans. It also protects the atmosphere, and thus life, from the sun's powerful wind. But what about other Earth-like planets in the galaxy? Do they also have magnetic fields to protect emerging life?

    A new analysis looks at one type of exoplanet – super-Earths up to five times the size of our own planet – and concludes that they probably do have a magnetic field, but one generated in a totally novel way: by the planets' magma oceans. The surprising discovery that slowly churning melted rock at or under the surface can generate a strong magnetic field also suggests that in Earth's early years, when it was largely a lump of melted rock, it also had a magma-generated magnetic field. This was in addition to its present-day field, which is generated in the liquid-iron outer core.

    "This is a new regime for the generation of planetary magnetic fields," said Burkhard Militzer, a UC Berkeley professor of earth and planetary science. "Our magnetic field on Earth is generated in the liquid outer iron core. On Jupiter, it arises from the convection of liquid metallic hydrogen. On Uranus and Neptune, it is assumed to be generated in the ice layers. Now we have added molten rocks to this diverse list of field-generating materials."
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  26. #1496
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    Time for a look back at Tycho's Star, the 1572 supernova


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1807.03593

    Tycho's supernova: the view from Gaia

    Pilar Ruiz-Lapuente, et al.(Submitted on 10 Jul 2018 (v1), last revised 21 Nov 2018 (this version, v2))

    SN 1572 (Tycho Brahe's supernova) clearly belongs to the Ia (thermonuclear) type. It was produced by the explosion of a white dwarf in a binary system. Its remnant has been the first of this type to be explored in search of a possible surviving companion, the mass donor that brought the white dwarf to the point of explosion. A high peculiar motion with respect to the stars at the same location in the Galaxy, mainly due to the orbital velocity at the time of the explosion, is a basic criterion for the detection of such companions. Radial velocities from the spectra of the stars close to the geometrical center of Tycho's supernova remnant, plus proper motions of the same stars, obtained by astrometry with the {\it Hubble Space Telescope}, have been used so far. In addition, a detailed chemical analysis of the atmospheres of a sample of candidate stars had been made. However, the distances to the stars, remained uncertain. Now, the Second {\it Gaia} Data Release (DR2) provides unprecedent accurate distances and new proper motions for the stars can be compared with those made from the {\it HST}. We consider the Galactic orbits that the candidate stars to SN companion would have in the future. We do this to explore kinematic peculiarity. We also locate a representative sample of candidate stars in the Toomre diagram. Using the new data, we reevaluate here the status of the candidates suggested thus far, as well as the larger sample of the stars seen in the central region of the remnant.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  27. #1497
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    Weather report from the edge of the solar system.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.08468

    Analysis of Neptune's 2017 Bright Equatorial Storm

    Edward Molter, et al. (Submitted on 20 Nov 2018)

    We report the discovery of a large (∼8500 km diameter) infrared-bright storm at Neptune's equator in June 2017. We tracked the storm over a period of 7 months with high-cadence infrared snapshot imaging, carried out on 14 nights at the 10 meter Keck II telescope and 17 nights at the Shane 120 inch reflector at Lick Observatory. The cloud feature was larger and more persistent than any equatorial clouds seen before on Neptune, remaining intermittently active from at least 10 June to 31 December 2017. Our Keck and Lick observations were augmented by very high-cadence images from the amateur community, which permitted the determination of accurate drift rates for the cloud feature. Its zonal drift speed was variable from 10 June to at least 25 July, but remained a constant 237.4 ± 0.2 m s−1 from 30 September until at least 15 November. The pressure of the cloud top was determined from radiative transfer calculations to be 0.3-0.6 bar; this value remained constant over the course of the observations. Multiple cloud break-up events, in which a bright cloud band wrapped around Neptune's equator, were observed over the course of our observations. No "dark spot" vortices were seen near the equator in HST imaging on 6 and 7 October. The size and pressure of the storm are consistent with moist convection or a planetary-scale wave as the energy source of convective upwelling, but more modeling is required to determine the driver of this equatorial disturbance as well as the triggers for and dynamics of the observed cloud break-up events.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  28. #1498
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    Rings around small bodies in the solar system, known and suspected.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.09437

    Ring dynamics around non-axisymmetric bodies with application to Chariklo and Haumea

    B. Sicardy, R. Leiva, S. Renner, F. Roques, M. El Moutamid, P. Santos-Sanz, J. Desmars (Submitted on 23 Nov 2018)

    Dense and narrow rings have been discovered recently around the small Centaur object Chariklo and the dwarf planet Haumea, while being suspected around the Centaur Chiron. They are the first rings observed in the Solar System elsewhere than around giant planets. Contrarily to the latters, gravitational fields of small bodies may exhibit large non-axisymmetric terms that create strong resonances between the spin of the object and the mean motion of rings particles. Here we show that modest topographic features or elongations of Chariklo and Haumea explain why their rings are relatively far away from the central body, when scaled to those of the giant planets. Lindblad-type resonances actually clear on decadal time-scales an initial collisional disk that straddles the corotation resonance (where the particles mean motion matches the spin rate of the body). The disk material inside the corotation radius migrates onto the body, while the material outside the corotation radius is pushed outside the 1/2 resonance, where the particles complete one revolution while the body completes two rotations. Consequently, the existence of rings around non-axisymmetric bodies requires that the 1/2 resonance resides inside the Roche limit of the body, favoring fast rotators for being surrounded by rings.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  29. #1499
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    Big download: 25 pages, 9 figures; introduction to book of same title, Springer ASSL Vol 453. Might be of interest to some here.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.10604

    Astrophysics with radioactive isotopes

    Roland Diehl (Submitted on 26 Nov 2018)

    Radioactivity was discovered as a by-product of searching for elements with suitable chemical properties. Understanding its characteristics led to the development of nuclear physics, understanding that unstable configurations of nucleons transform into stable end products through radioactive decay. In the universe, nuclear reactions create new nuclei under the energetic circumstances characterising cosmic nucleosynthesis sites, such as the cores of stars and supernova explosions. Observing the radioactive decays of unstable nuclei, which are by-products of such cosmic nucleosynthesis, is a special discipline of astronomy. Understanding these special cosmic sites, their environments, their dynamics, and their physical processes, is the `Astrophysics with Radioactivities' that makes the subject of this book. We address the history, the candidate sites of nucleosynthesis, the different observational opportunities, and the tools of this field of astrophysics.

    =====================

    The characteristics of a particular type of star might hinder you from finding planets around it.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1811.10961

    Can we really detect planets around evolved massive stars?

    E. Delgado Mena (Submitted on 27 Nov 2018)

    The discovery of planets around massive stars is important for understanding how planet formation and evolution is conditioned by different stellar environments. However, current planetary search surveys have failed to detect planets around massive evolved stars. This lack of planets might be a consequence of the specifities of planet formation around such objects. Alternatively, the detection of planets around evolved massive stars might be hindered by the increasing stellar jitter as the stars evolve. In this project we target planets around evolved stars in open clusters, most of them with masses above 2 M ⊙ . We present the cases of three objects where long term (i.e. years) and high amplitude RV signals of probably stellar origin are mimicking the presence of planets.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  30. #1500
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    This one's new to me. At least no one is claiming it's Sodom.


    https://www.livescience.com/64179-an...ddle-east.html

    Cosmic Airburst May Have Wiped Out Part of the Middle East 3,700 Years Ago
    By Owen Jarus, Live Science Contributor | November 28, 2018 06:32am ET

    Some 3,700 years ago, a meteor or comet exploded over the Middle East, wiping out human life across a swath of land called Middle Ghor, north of the Dead Sea, say archaeologists who have found evidence of the cosmic airburst.

    The airburst "in an instant, devastated approximately 500 km2 [about 200 square miles] immediately north of the Dead Sea, not only wiping out 100 percent of the [cities] and towns, but also stripping agricultural soils from once-fertile fields and covering the eastern Middle Ghor with a super-heated brine of Dead Sea anhydride salts pushed over the landscape by the event's frontal shock waves," the researchers wrote in the abstract for a paper that was presented at the American Schools of Oriental Research annual meeting held in Denver Nov. 14 to 17. Anhydride salts are a mix of salt and sulfates.

    "Based upon the archaeological evidence, it took at least 600 years to recover sufficiently from the soil destruction and contamination before civilization could again become established in the eastern Middle Ghor," they wrote. Among the places destroyed was Tall el-Hammam, an ancient city that covered 89 acres (36 hectares) of land.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

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