Page 52 of 52 FirstFirst ... 242505152
Results 1,531 to 1,556 of 1556

Thread: Fun Papers In Arxiv

  1. #1531
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,942
    Nature throws another wrench into our understanding of supernovae.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1901.03332

    Type Ibn Supernovae May Not All Come from Massive Stars

    Griffin Hosseinzadeh, et al. (Submitted on 10 Jan 2019)

    Because core-collapse supernovae are the explosions of massive stars, which have relatively short lifetimes, they occur almost exclusively in galaxies with active star formation. On the other hand, the Type Ibn supernova PS1-12sk exploded in an environment much more typical of thermonuclear (Type Ia) supernovae: on the outskirts of the brightest elliptical galaxy in a galaxy cluster. The lack of any obvious star formation at that location presented a challenge to models of Type Ibn supernovae as the explosions of very massive Wolf-Rayet stars. Here we present a supplementary search for star formation at the site of PS1-12sk, now that the supernova has faded, via deep ultraviolet imaging of the host cluster with the Hubble Space Telescope. We do not detect any ultraviolet emission within 1 kpc of the supernova location, which allows us deepen the limit on star formation rate by an order of magnitude compared to the original study on this event. In light of this new limit, we discuss whether the progenitors of Type Ibn supernovae can be massive stars and what reasonable alternatives have been proposed.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  2. #1532
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,942
    A future double black hole?

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1901.04769

    Weighing Melnick 34: the most massive binary system known

    Katie A. Tehrani, et al. (Submitted on 15 Jan 2019)

    Here we confirm Melnick 34, an X-ray bright star in the 30 Doradus region of the Large Magellanic Cloud, as an SB2 binary comprising WN5h+WN5h components. We present orbital solutions using 26 epochs of VLT/UVES spectra and 22 epochs of archival Gemini/GMOS spectra. Radial-velocity monitoring and automated template fitting methods both reveal a similar high eccentricity system with a mass ratio close to unity, and an orbital period in agreement with the 155.1 +/- 1 day X-ray light curve period previously derived by Pollock et al. Our favoured solution derived an eccentricity of 0.68 +/- 0.02 and mass ratio of 0.92 +/- 0.07, giving minimum masses of Ma_sin^{3}(i) = 65 +/- 7 Msun and Mb_sin^{3}(i) = 60 +/- 7 Msun. Spectral modelling using WN5h templates with CMFGEN reveals temperatures of T ~53 kK for each component and luminosities of log(La/Lsun) = 6.43 +/- 0.08 and log(Lb/Lsun) = 6.37 +/- 0.08, from which BONNSAI evolutionary modelling gives masses of Ma = 139 (+21,-18) Msun and Mb = 127 (+17,-17) Msun and ages of ~0.6 Myrs. Spectroscopic and dynamic masses would agree if Mk34 has an inclination of i ~50°, making Mk34 the most massive binary known and an excellent candidate for investigating the properties of colliding wind binaries. Within 2-3 Myrs, both components of Mk34 are expected to evolve to stellar mass black holes which, assuming the binary system survives, would make Mk34 a potential binary black hole merger progenitor and gravitational wave source.

    ======

    This paper is getting a lot of attention lately, as it suggests a way that a supermassive black hole could grow to enormous size in short order.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1901.03731

    A new class of flares from accreting supermassive black holes

    Benny Trakhtenbrot, et al. (Submitted on 11 Jan 2019)

    Accreting supermassive black holes (SMBHs) can exhibit variable emission across the electromagnetic spectrum and over a broad range of timescales. The variability of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the ultraviolet and optical is usually at the few tens of per cent level over timescales of hours to weeks. Recently, rare, more dramatic changes to the emission from accreting SMBHs have been observed, including tidal disruption events, 'changing look' AGNs and other extreme variability objects. The physics behind the 're-ignition', enhancement and 'shut-down' of accretion onto SMBHs is not entirely understood. Here we present a rapid increase in ultraviolet-optical emission in the centre of a nearby galaxy, marking the onset of sudden increased accretion onto a SMBH. The optical spectrum of this flare, dubbed AT 2017bgt, exhibits a mix of emission features. Some are typical of luminous, unobscured AGNs, but others are likely driven by Bowen fluorescence - robustly linked here with high-velocity gas in the vicinity of the accreting SMBH. The spectral features and increased ultraviolet flux show little evolution over a period of at least 14 months. This disfavours the tidal disruption of a star as their origin, and instead suggests a longer-term event of intensified accretion. Together with two other recently reported events with similar properties, we define a new class of SMBH-related flares. This has important implications for the classification of different types of enhanced accretion onto SMBHs.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  3. #1533
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,942
    Now for some Local Group news, starting with two galaxies I grew up believing were Local Group members (they aren't, but they're close), a look at the gas bridge between the Magellanic Clouds and the Milky Way (which turns out to be a major problem), and ending with a great paper on the Milky Way's satellite galaxies.

    ===

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1901.05981

    The Distance and Motion of the Maffei Group

    Gagandeep S. Anand, R. Brent Tully, Luca Rizzi, Igor D. Karachentsev (Submitted on 17 Jan 2019)

    It has recently been suggested that the nearby galaxies Maffei 1 and 2 are further in distance than previously thought, such that they no longer are members of the same galaxy group as IC 342. We reanalyze near-infrared photometry from the Hubble Space Telescope, and find a distance to Maffei 2 of 5.73±0.40 Mpc. With this distance, the Maffei Group lies 2.5 Mpc behind the IC 342 Group and has a peculiar velocity toward the Local Group of −128±33 km/s. The negative peculiar velocities of both of these distinct galaxy groups are likely the manifestation of void expansion from the direction of Perseus-Pisces.

    ===

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1901.05636

    The Magellanic System: the puzzle of the leading gas stream

    Thor Tepper-García, Joss Bland-Hawthorn, Marcel S. Pawlowski, Tobias K. Fritz (Submitted on 17 Jan 2019)

    The Magellanic Clouds (MCs) are the most massive gas-bearing systems falling into the Galaxy at the present epoch. They show clear signs of interaction, manifested in particular by the Magellanic Stream, a spectacular gaseous wake that trails from the MCs extending more than 150 degree across the sky. Ahead of the MCs is the "Leading Arm" usually interpreted as the gaseous counterpart of the Magellanic Stream, an assumption we now call into question. We revisit the formation of these tidal features in a first-infall scenario, including for the first time a Galactic model with a weakly magnetised, spinning hot corona. In agreement with previous studies, we broadly recover the location and the extension of the Stream on the sky. In contrast, we find that the formation of the Leading Arm -- that is otherwise present in models without a corona -- is inhibited by the hydrodynamic interaction with the hot component. These results hold with or without coronal rotation or a weak, ambient magnetic field. Since the existence of the hot corona is well established, we are led to two possible interpretations: (i) the Leading Arm survives because the coronal density beyond 20 kpc is a factor of 10 lower than required by conventional spheroidal coronal x-ray models, consistent with recent claims of rapid coronal rotation; or (ii) the `Leading Arm' is cool gas trailing from a frontrunner, a satellite moving ahead of the MCs, consistent with its higher metallicity compared to the trailing stream. Both scenarios raise issues that we discuss.

    ===

    49 pages, 8 figures, 1 table. Large detailed document on the the satellites of the Milky Way. Excellent.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1901.05465

    The Faintest Dwarf Galaxies

    Joshua D. Simon (Carnegie Observatories) (Submitted on 16 Jan 2019)

    The lowest luminosity (L < 10^5 L_sun) Milky Way satellite galaxies represent the extreme lower limit of the galaxy luminosity function. These ultra-faint dwarfs are the oldest, most dark matter-dominated, most metal-poor, and least chemically evolved stellar systems known. They therefore provide unique windows into the formation of the first galaxies and the behavior of dark matter on small scales. In this review, we summarize the discovery of ultra-faint dwarfs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey in 2005, and the subsequent observational and theoretical progress in understanding their nature and origin. We describe their stellar kinematics, chemical abundance patterns, structural properties, stellar populations, orbits, and luminosity function, and what can be learned from each type of measurement. We conclude that: (1) in most cases, the stellar velocity dispersions of ultra-faint dwarfs are robust against systematic uncertainties such as binary stars and foreground contamination; (2) the chemical abundance patterns of stars in ultra-faint dwarfs require two sources of r-process elements, one of which can likely be attributed to neutron star mergers; (3) even under conservative assumptions, only a small fraction of ultra-faint dwarfs may have suffered significant tidal stripping of their stellar components; (4) determining the properties of the faintest dwarfs out to the virial radius of the Milky Way will require very large investments of observing time with future telescopes. Finally, we offer a look forward at the observations that will be possible with future facilities as the push toward a complete census of the Local Group dwarf galaxy population continues.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  4. #1534
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,942
    The two most important space probes sent to Jupiter have returned confusing findings that challenge the old views of our largest planet ("old" meaning what we thought of Jupiter right before Galileo got there). Do we throw out some data, or what?


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1901.05697

    New models of Jupiter in the context of Juno and Galileo

    Florian Debras, Gilles Chabrier (Submitted on 17 Jan 2019)

    Observations of Jupiter's gravity field by Juno have revealed surprisingly small values for the high order gravitational moments, considering the abundances of heavy elements measured by Galileo 20 years ago. The derivation of recent equations of state for hydrogen and helium, much denser in the Mbar region, worsen the conflict between these two observations. In order to circumvent this puzzle, current Jupiter model studies either ignore the constraint from Galileo or invoke an ad hoc modification of the equations of state. In this paper, we derive Jupiter models which satisfy both Juno and Galileo constraints. We confirm that Jupiter's structure must encompass at least four different regions: an outer convective envelope, a region of compositional, thus entropy change, an inner convective envelope and an extended diluted core enriched in heavy elements, and potentially a central compact core. We show that, in order to reproduce Juno and Galileo observations, one needs a significant entropy increase between the outer and inner envelopes and a smaller density than for an isentropic profile, associated with some external differential rotation. The best way to fulfill this latter condition is an inward decreasing abundance of heavy elements in this region. We examine in details the three physical mechanisms able to yield such a change of entropy and composition: a first order molecular-metallic hydrogen transition, immiscibility between hydrogen and helium or a region of layered convection. Given our present knowledge of hydrogen pressure ionization, combination of the two latter mechanisms seems to be the most favoured solution.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  5. #1535
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,942
    Yet another (ANOTHER!) nearby planetary system around a red dwarf.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1901.05338

    HADES RV programme with HARPS-N at TNG. X. A super-Earth around the M dwarf Gl686

    L. Affer, et al. (Submitted on 16 Jan 2019)

    The HArps-n red Dwarf Exoplanet Survey is providing a major contribution to the widening of the current statistics of low-mass planets, through the in-depth analysis of precise radial velocity measurements in a narrow range of spectral sub-types. As part of that programme, we obtained radial velocity measurements of Gl 686, an M1 dwarf at d = 8.2 pc. The analysis of data obtained within an intensive observing campaign demonstrates that the excess dispersion is due to a coherent signal, with a period of 15.53 d. Almost simultaneous photometric observations were carried out within the APACHE and EXORAP programmes to characterize the stellar activity and to distinguish periodic variations related to activity from signals due to the presence of planetary companions, complemented also with ASAS photometric data. We took advantage of the available radial velocity measurements for this target from other observing campaigns. The analysis of the radial velocity composite time series from the HIRES, HARPS and HARPS-N spectrographs, consisting of 198 measurements taken over 20 years, enabled us to address the nature of periodic signals and also to characterize stellar physical parameters (mass, temperature, and rotation). We report the discovery of a super-Earth orbiting at a distance of 0.092 AU from the host star Gl 686. Gl 686 b has a minimum mass of 7.1 +/- 0.9 M-Earth and an orbital period of 15.532 +/- 0.002 d. The analysis of the activity indexes, correlated noise through a Gaussian process framework and photometry, provides an estimate of the stellar rotation period at 37 d, and highlights the variability of the spot configuration during the long timespan covering 20 yrs. The observed periodicities around 2,000 d likely point to the existence of an activity cycle.

    ===

    Just how many red dwarfs are around us? 1,120 within 25 parsecs. Plus MORE (MORE!) nearby red-dwarf planetary systems.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1901.06364

    The Solar Neighborhood XLV. The Stellar Multiplicity Rate of M Dwarfs Within 25 pc

    Jennifer G. Winters, et al. (Submitted on 18 Jan 2019)

    We present results of the largest, most comprehensive study ever done of the stellar multiplicity of the most common stars in the Galaxy, the red dwarfs. We have conducted an all-sky, volume-limited survey for stellar companions to 1,120 M dwarf primaries known to lie within 25 pc of the Sun via trigonometric parallaxes. In addition to a comprehensive literature search, stars were explored in new surveys for companions at separations of 2" to 300". A reconnaissance of wide companions to separations of 300" was done via blinking archival images. I-band images were used to search our sample for companions at separations of 2" to 180". Various astrometric and photometric methods were used to probe the inner 2" to reveal close companions. We report the discovery of 20 new companions and identify 56 candidate multiple systems. We find a stellar multiplicity rate of 26.8 +/- 1.4% and a stellar companion rate of 32.4 +/- 1.4% for M dwarfs. There is a broad peak in the separation distribution of the companions at 4-20 AU, with a weak trend of smaller projected linear separations for lower mass primaries. A hint that M dwarf multiplicity may be a function of tangential velocity is found, with faster moving, presumably older, stars found to be multiple somewhat less often. We calculate that stellar companions make up at least 17% of mass attributed to M dwarfs in the solar neighborhood, with roughly 11% of M dwarf mass hidden as unresolved companions. Finally, when considering all M dwarf primaries and companions, we find that the mass distribution for M dwarfs increases to the end of the stellar main sequence.

    ===

    More on the red giant with a planet around it.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1901.06187

    Asteroseismology of the Hyades red giant and planet host epsilon Tau

    Torben Arentoft, et al. (Submitted on 18 Jan 2019)

    Asteroseismic analysis of solar-like stars allows us to determine physical parameters such as stellar mass, with a higher precision compared to most other methods. Even in a well-studied cluster such as the Hyades, the masses of the red giant stars are not well known, and previous mass estimates are based on model calculations (isochrones). The four known red giants in the Hyades are assumed to be clump (core-helium-burning) stars based on their positions in colour-magnitude diagrams, however asteroseismology offers an opportunity to test this assumption. Using asteroseismic techniques combined with other methods, we aim to derive physical parameters and the evolutionary stage for the planet hosting star epsilon Tau, which is one of the four red giants located in the Hyades. We analysed time-series data from both ground and space to perform the asteroseismic analysis. By combining high signal-to-noise (S/N) radial-velocity data from the ground-based SONG network with continuous space-based data from the revised Kepler mission K2, we derive and characterize 27 individual oscillation modes for epsilon Tau, along with global oscillation parameters such as the large frequency separation and the ratio between the amplitude of the oscillations measured in radial velocity and intensity as a function of frequency. The latter has been measured previously for only two stars, the Sun and Procyon. Combining the seismic analysis with interferometric and spectroscopic measurements, we derive physical parameters for epsilon Tau, and discuss its evolutionary status.

    QUOTES: Sato et al. (2007) found a planetary companion to e Tau, which was the first exoplanet found in an open cluster. Based on a stellar mass of M = 2.7 ± 0.1 M⊙, they derived a planetary mass of m2 sin i = 7.6 ± 0.2 MJ. With our slightly lower stellar mass of M = 2.458 ± 0.073 M⊙, in agreement with Stello et al. (2017), we can redetermine the minimum mass of the planet, using the velocity semi-amplitude, orbital period, and eccentricity presented in Sato et al. (2007). We find the new minimum mass of the planet to be m2 sin i = 7.1 ± 0.2 MJ.
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2019-Jan-22 at 04:32 PM.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  6. #1536
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    2,356
    The Solar Neighborhood XLV. The Stellar Multiplicity Rate of M Dwarfs Within 25 pc

    Jennifer G. Winters, et al. (Submitted on 18 Jan 2019)


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1901.06364

    <EDIT>
    "Finally, when considering all M dwarf primaries and companions, we find that the mass distribution for M dwarfs increases to the end of the stellar main sequence. "

    That alone is a very interesting statement.

    They have found that many of the low mass stars have previously unknown stellar companions of even lower mass. Previously most of these systems were counted as single objects.

    When you account for their low mass companions properly, the stellar mass distribution carries on increasing at the low mass end. Previously, counting these systems as single stars, the mass distribution flattened or fell at the low end.

    The low mass end here is the red dwarf/ brown dwarf boundary. So I have to wonder about the number of high mass brown dwarfs. It seems unlikely there would be a sudden cutoff in the mass distribution just at this boundary?

  7. #1537
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,942
    It struck me that though the multiplicity ration was lower for M-dwarfs than for more massive, brighter stars, the sheer number of M-dwarfs causes the number of multiple-star M-dwarfs to exceed by an extreme margin all other multiple stellar types put together.

    Brown dwarfs, giant planets, super-Earths, and so on are implied to be vast in number, attached to M-dwarfs. At least as I read it.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  8. #1538
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,942
    One of the byproducts of using Big Data: monitoring stellar traffic around the Milky Way ("Look's like we got us a convoy!")


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1901.06387

    Extended stellar systems in the solar neighborhood - II. Discovery of a nearby 120° stellar stream in Gaia DR2

    Stefan Meingast, João Alves, Verena Fürnkranz (Submitted on 18 Jan 2019)

    We report the discovery of a large, dynamically cold, coeval stellar stream that is currently traversing the immediate solar neighborhood at a distance of only 100 pc. The structure was identified in a wavelet decomposition of the 3D velocity space of all stars within 300 pc to the Sun. Its members form a highly elongated structure with a length of at least 400 pc, while its vertical extent measures only about 50 pc. Stars in the stream are not isotropically distributed but instead form two parallel lanes with individual local overdensities, that may correspond to a remnant core of a tidally disrupted cluster or OB association. Its members follow a very well-defined main sequence in the observational Hertzsprung-Russel diagram and also show a remarkably low 3D velocity dispersion of only 1.3 km s −1 . These findings strongly suggest a common origin as a single coeval stellar population. An extrapolation of the present-day mass function indicates a total mass of at least 2000 M ⊙ , making it larger than most currently known clusters or associations in the solar neighborhood. We estimated the stream's age to be around 1 Gyr based on a comparison with a set of isochrones and giant stars in our member selection and find a mean metallicity of [Fe/H]=−0.04 . This structure may very well represent the Galactic disk counterpart to the prominent stellar streams observed in the Milky Way halo. As such, it constitutes a new valuable probe to constrain the Galaxy's mass distribution.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  9. #1539
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,942
    Has the first Trojan/co-orbital planetary system been discovered by TESS?

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1901.07250

    Co-orbital exoplanets from close period candidates: The TOI-178 case

    Adrien Leleu, et al. (Submitted on 22 Jan 2019)

    Despite the existence of co-orbital bodies in the solar system, and the prediction of the formation of co-orbital planets by planetary system formation models, no co-orbital exoplanets (also called trojans) have been detected thus far. Here we study the signature of co-orbital exoplanets in transit surveys when two planet candidates in the system orbit the star with similar periods. Such pair of candidates could be discarded as false positives because they are not Hill-stable. However, horseshoe or long libration period tadpole co-orbital configurations can explain such period similarity. This degeneracy can be solved by considering the Transit Timing Variations (TTVs) of each planet. We then focus on the three planet candidates system TOI-178: the two outer candidates of that system have similar orbital period and had an angular separation near π/3 during the TESS observation of sector 2. Based on the announced orbits, the long-term stability of the system requires the two close-period planets to be co-orbitals. Our independent detrending and transit search recover and slightly favour the three orbits close to a 3:2:2 resonant chain found by the TESS pipeline, although we cannot exclude an alias that would put the system close to a 4:3:2 configuration. We then analyse in more detail the co-orbital scenario. We show that despite the influence of an inner planet just outside the 2:3 mean-motion resonance, this potential co-orbital system can be stable on the Giga-year time-scale for a variety of planetary masses, either on a trojan or a horseshoe orbit. We predict that large TTVs should arise in such configuration with a period of several hundred days. We then show how the mass of each planet can be retrieved from these TTVs.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  10. #1540
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,942
    "Cooking" produces the atmosphere of Titan.

    https://phys.org/news/2019-01-scient...tmosphere.html

    Scientist sheds light on Titan's mysterious atmosphere
    January 23, 2019, Southwest Research Institute

    A new Southwest Research Institute study tackles one of the greatest mysteries about Titan, one of Saturn's moons: the origin of its thick, nitrogen-rich atmosphere. The study posits that one key to Titan's mysterious atmosphere is the "cooking" of organic material in the moon's interior.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  11. #1541
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,942
    VERY close, almost-in-our-backyard red dwarf gives off an amazing superflare.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1901.08647

    A Hot Ultraviolet Flare on the M Dwarf Star GJ 674

    C.S. Froning, et al. (Submitted on 24 Jan 2019)

    As part of the Mega MUSCLES Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Treasury program, we obtained time-series ultraviolet spectroscopy of the M2.5V star, GJ~674. During the FUV monitoring observations, the target exhibited several small flares and one large flare (E_FUV = 10^{30.75} ergs) that persisted over the entirety of a HST orbit and had an equivalent duration >30,000 sec, comparable to the highest relative amplitude event previously recorded in the FUV. The flare spectrum exhibited enhanced line emission from chromospheric, transition region, and coronal transitions and a blue FUV continuum with an unprecedented color temperature of T_c ~ 40,000+/-10,000 K. In this paper, we compare the flare FUV continuum emission with parameterizations of radiative hydrodynamic model atmospheres of M star flares. We find that the observed flare continuum can be reproduced using flare models but only with the ad hoc addition of hot, dense emitting component. This observation demonstrates that flares with hot FUV continuum temperatures and significant EUV/FUV energy deposition will continue to be of importance to exoplanet atmospheric chemistry and heating even as the host M dwarfs age beyond their most active evolutionary phases.

    ===

    Yet another five-planet exosystem, but nothing larger than Neptune. Fascinating.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1901.09092

    Near-resonance in a system of sub-Neptunes from TESS

    Samuel N. Quinn, et al. (Submitted on 25 Jan 2019)

    We report the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS ) detection of a multi-planet system orbiting the V=10.9 K0 dwarf TOI 125. We find evidence for up to five planets, with varying confidence. Three high signal-to-noise transit signals correspond to sub-Neptune-sized planets (2.76, 2.79, and 2.94 R⊕), and we statistically validate the planetary nature of the two inner planets (P b =4.65 days, P c =9.15 days). With only two transits observed, we report the outer object (P .03 =19.98 days) as a high signal-to-noise ratio planet candidate. We also detect a candidate transiting super-Earth (1.4 R⊕) with an orbital period of only 12.7 hours and a candidate Neptune-sized planet (4.2 R⊕) with a period of 13.28 days, both at low signal-to-noise. This system is amenable to mass determination via radial velocities and transit timing variations, and provides an opportunity to study planets of similar size while controlling for age and environment. The ratio of orbital periods between TOI 125 b and c (P c /P b =1.97 ) is slightly smaller than an exact 2:1 commensurability and is atypical of multiple planet systems from Kepler , which show a preference for period ratios just wide of first-order period ratios. A dynamical analysis refines the allowed parameter space through stability arguments and suggests that, despite the nearly commensurate periods, the system is unlikely to be in resonance.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  12. #1542
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,942
    Welcome to the newest member of the Local Group... Bedin I.

    https://phys.org/news/2019-01-hubble...hbourhood.html

    Hubble fortuitously discovers a new galaxy in the cosmic neighbourhood

    January 31, 2019, ESA/Hubble Information Centre

    Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to study some of the oldest and faintest stars in the globular cluster NGC 6752 have made an unexpected finding. They discovered a dwarf galaxy in our cosmic backyard, only 30 million light-years away. The finding is reported in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters.

    https://academic.oup.com/mnrasl/arti.../1/L54/5288002
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  13. #1543
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,942
    So, maybe dark matter doesn't exist after all? New theory awaits proof.


    https://phys.org/news/2019-01-dark-a...ve-theory.html

    Dark matter may not actually exist – and our alternative theory can be put to the test

    January 31, 2019 by Juri Smirnov, The Conversation

    Scientists have been searching for "dark matter" – an unknown and invisible substance thought to make up the vast majority of matter in the universe – for nearly a century. The reason for this persistence is that dark matter is needed to account for the fact that galaxies don't seem to obey the fundamental laws of physics. However, dark matter searches have remained unsuccessful.

    But there are other approaches to make sense of why galaxies behave so strangely. Our new study, published in the Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, shows that, by tweaking the laws of gravity on the enormous scales of galaxies, we may not actually need dark matter after all.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  14. #1544
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,942
    Finally able to give occurrence rates for certain types of planets around certain types of stars. A breakthrough!

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1902.01417

    Occurrence Rates of Planets orbiting FGK Stars: Combining Kepler DR25, Gaia DR2 and Bayesian Inference

    Danley C. Hsu, Eric B. Ford, Darin Ragozzine, Keir Ashby (Submitted on 4 Feb 2019)

    We characterize the occurrence rate of planets, ranging in size from 0.5-16 R ⊕ , orbiting FGK stars with orbital periods from 0.5-500 days. Our analysis is based on results from the `DR25' catalog of planet candidates produced by NASA's Kepler mission and stellar radii from Gaia `DR2'. We incorporate additional Kepler data products to accurately characterize the the efficiency of planets being recognized as a `threshold crossing events' (TCE) by Kepler's Transiting Planet Search pipeline and labeled as a planet candidate by the robovetter. Using a hierarchical Bayesian model, we derive planet occurrence rates for a wide range of planet sizes and orbital periods. For planets with sizes 1-1.75 R ⊕ and orbital periods of 237-500 days, we find a rate of planets per FGK star of 0.24 +0.11 −0.10 (68.3% credible interval). While the true rate of such planets could be lower by a factor of ∼ 2 (primarily due to potential contamination of planet candidates by false alarms), the upper limits on the occurrence rate of such planets are robust to ∼ 10% . We recommend that mission concepts aiming to characterize potentially rocky planets in or near the habitable zone of sun-like stars prepare compelling science programs that would be robust for a true rate in the range f R,P =0.05−0.51 for 1−1.75 R ⊕ planets with orbital periods in 237-500 days, or a differential rate of Γ ⊕ ≡(d 2 f)/[d(lnP) d(lnR p )]=0.11−1.2 .
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  15. #1545
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,942
    Two newly discovered families of asteroids, one as old as the Solar System and probably original planetesimals.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1902.01633

    An ancient and a primordial collisional family as the main sources of X-type asteroids of the inner Main Belt

    Marco Delbo, Chrysa Avdellidou, Alessandro Morbidelli (Submitted on 5 Feb 2019)

    The near-Earth asteroid population suggests the existence of an inner Main Belt source of asteroids that belongs to the spectroscopic X-complex and has moderate albedos. The identification of such a source has been lacking so far. We argue that the most probable source is one or more collisional asteroid families that escaped discovery up to now. We apply a novel method to search for asteroid families in the inner Main Belt population of asteroids belonging to the X-complex with moderate albedo. Instead of searching for asteroid clusters in orbital elements space, which could be severely dispersed when older than some billions of years, our method looks for correlations between the orbital semimajor axis and the inverse size of asteroids. This correlation is the signature of members of collisional families, which drifted from a common centre under the effect of the Yarkovsky thermal effect. We identify two previously unknown families in the inner Main Belt among the moderate-albedo X-complex asteroids. One of them, whose lowest numbered asteroid is (161) Author, is ~3 Gyrs-old, whereas the second one, whose lowest numbered object is (689) Zita, can be as old as the Solar System. Members of this latter family have orbital eccentricities and inclinations that spread them over the entire inner Main Belt, which is an indication that this family could be primordial, i.e. it formed before the giant planet orbital instability. The vast majority of moderate-albedo X-complex asteroids of the inner-Main Belt are genetically related, as they can be included into few asteroid families. Only nine X-complex asteroids with moderate albedo of the inner Main Belt cannot be included in asteroid families. We suggest that these bodies formed by direct accretion of the solids in the protoplanetary disk, and are thus surviving planetesimals.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  16. #1546
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,942
    Tidal stress from nearby planets in closely packed systems might produce continental plate movement--and some monster earthquakes. Many exoplanet examples, heavily documented, well worth a look.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1711.09898

    The Ability of Significant Tidal Stress to Initiate Plate Tectonics

    J. J. Zanazzi, Amaury H.M.J. Triaud (Submitted on 27 Nov 2017 (v1), last revised 4 Feb 2019 (this version, v2))

    Plate tectonics is a geophysical process currently unique to Earth, has an important role in regulating the Earth's climate, and may be better understood by identifying rocky planets outside our solar system with tectonic activity. The key criterion for whether or not plate tectonics may occur on a terrestrial planet is if the stress on a planet's lithosphere from mantle convection may overcome the lithosphere's yield stress. Although many rocky exoplanets closely orbiting their host stars have been detected, all studies to date of plate tectonics on exoplanets have neglected tidal stresses in the planet's lithosphere. Modeling a rocky exoplanet as a constant density, homogeneous, incompressible sphere, we show the tidal stress from the host star acting on close-in planets may become comparable to the stress on the lithosphere from mantle convection. We also show that tidal stresses from planet-planet interactions are unlikely to be significant for plate tectonics, but may be strong enough to trigger Earthquakes. Our work may imply planets orbiting close to their host stars are more likely to experience plate tectonics, with implications for exoplanetary geophysics and habitability. We produce a list of detected rocky exoplanets under the most intense stresses. Atmospheric and topographic observations may confirm our predictions in the near future. Investigations of planets with significant tidal stress can not only lead to observable parameters linked to the presence of active plate tectonics, but may also be used as a tool to test theories on the main driving force behind tectonic activity.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  17. #1547
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,942
    Citizen scientists hit pay dirt once again with a new, temperate planet discovered.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1902.02789

    K2-288Bb: A Small Temperate Planet in a Low-mass Binary System Discovered by Citizen Scientists

    Adina D. Feinstein, et al. (Submitted on 7 Feb 2019)

    Observations from the Kepler and K2 missions have provided the astronomical community with unprecedented amounts of data to search for transiting exoplanets and other astrophysical phenomena. Here, we present K2-288, a low-mass binary system (M2.0 +/- 1.0; M3.0 +/- 1.0) hosting a small (Rp = 1.9 R Earth), temperate (Teq = 226 K) planet observed in K2 Campaign 4. The candidate was first identified by citizen scientists using Exoplanet Explorers hosted on the Zooniverse platform. Follow-up observations and detailed analyses validate the planet and indicate that it likely orbits the secondary star on a 31.39-day period. This orbit places K2-288Bb in or near the habitable zone of its low-mass host star. K2-288Bb resides in a system with a unique architecture, as it orbits at >0.1 au from one component in a moderate separation binary (aproj approximately 55 au), and further follow-up may provide insight into its formation and evolution. Additionally, its estimated size straddles the observed gap in the planet radius distribution. Planets of this size occur less frequently and may be in a transient phase of radius evolution. K2-288 is the third transiting planet system identified by the Exoplanet Explorers program and its discovery exemplifies the value of citizen science in the era of Kepler, K2, and the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  18. #1548
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,942
    Revised version of paper with multiple corrections and other changes. Good stuff.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1810.07427

    The atmospheric fragmentation of the 1908 Tunguska Cosmic Body: reconsidering the possibility of a ground impact

    L. Foschini, L. Gasperini, C. Stanghellini, R. Serra, A. Polonia, G. Stanghellini (Submitted on 17 Oct 2018 (v1), last revised 11 Feb 2019 (this version, v2))

    The 1908 June 30 Tunguska Event (TE) is one of the best studied cases of cosmic body impacting the Earth with global effects. However, still today, significant doubts are casted on the different proposed event reconstructions, because of shortage of reliable information and uncertainties of available data. In the present work, we would like to revisit the atmospheric fragmentation of the Tunguska Cosmic Body (TCB) by taking into account the possibility that a metre-sized fragment could cause the formation of the Lake Cheko, located at about 9 ~km North-West from the epicentre. We performed order-of-magnitude calculations by using the classical single-body theory for the atmospheric dynamics of comets/asteroids, with the addition of the fragmentation conditions by Foschini (2001). We calibrated the numerical model by using the data of the Chelyabinsk Event (CE) of 2013 February 15. Our work favours the hypothesis that the TCB could have been a rubble-pile asteroid composed by boulders with very different materials with different mechanical strengths, density, and porosity. Before the impact, a close encounter with the Earth stripped at least one boulder, which fell aside the main body and excavated the Lake Cheko. We exclude the hypothesis of a single compact asteroid ejecting a metre-sized fragment during, or shortly before, the airburst, because there is no suitable combination of boulder mass and lateral velocity.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  19. #1549
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,942
    On a topic closely related to Tunguska, we have the recent Chelyabinsk and Cuba events. Can we predict them? Sort of.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1902.03980

    Can we predict the impact conditions of meter-sized meteoroids?

    Jorge I. Zuluaga [SEAP/IF/UdeA], Pablo A. Cuartas-Restrepo [SEAP/IF/UdeA], Jhonatan Ospina [SAA/CAMO], Mario Sucerquia [SEAP/IF/UdeA] (Submitted on 11 Feb 2019)

    A few meter-sized meteoroids impact the atmosphere of the Earth per year. Most (if not all) of them are undetectable before the impact and hence, predicting where and how they will fall, seems to be impossible. In this letter we show compelling evidence that we can constrain, in advance, the dynamical and geometrical conditions of an impact. For this purpose, we analyze the well-documented case of the Chelyabinsk impact and the more recent and smaller Cuba event, whose conditions we additionally estimate and provide here. After applying the {\em Gravitational Ray Tracing} algorithm (GRT) to theoretically "predict" the impact conditions of the aforementioned events, we find that the speed, incoming direction and (marginally) the orbital elements, can be constrained in advance, starting only on one hand, with the geographical location and time of the impact, and on the other hand, with the distribution in configuration space of Near Earth Objects (NEOs). Any improvement in our capability to predict or at least to constrain impact properties of medium-sized and large meteoroids, will help us to be better prepared for its potentially damaging effects.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  20. #1550
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,942
    Has a solution to the Standard Candle problem been found?

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1902.03261

    Type Ia Supernovae are Excellent Standard Candles in the Near-Infrared

    Arturo Avelino, Andrew S. Friedman, Kaisey S. Mandel, David O. Jones, Peter J. Challis, Robert P. Kirshner (Submitted on 8 Feb 2019)

    We analyze a set of 89 Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) that have both optical and near-infrared (NIR) photometry to derive distances and construct low redshift (z<0.04 ) Hubble diagrams. We construct mean light curve (LC) templates using a hierarchical Bayesian model. We explore both Gaussian process (GP) and template methods for fitting the LCs and estimating distances, while including peculiar velocity and photometric uncertainties. For the 56 SN Ia with both optical and NIR observations near maximum light, the GP method yields a NIR-only Hubble-diagram with a RMS of 0.117±0.014 mag when referenced to the NIR maxima. For each NIR band, a comparable GP method RMS is obtained when referencing to NIR-max or B-max. Using NIR LC templates referenced to B-max yields a larger RMS value of 0.138±0.014 mag. Fitting the corresponding optical data using standard LC fitters that use LC shape and color corrections yields larger RMS values of 0.179±0.018 mag with SALT2 and 0.174±0.021 mag with SNooPy. Applying our GP method to subsets of SN Ia NIR LCs at NIR maximum light, even without corrections for LC shape, color, or host-galaxy dust reddening, provides smaller RMS in the inferred distances, at the ∼2.3−4.1σ level, than standard optical methods that do correct for those effects. Our ongoing RAISIN program on the Hubble Space Telescope will exploit this promising infrared approach to limit systematic errors when measuring the expansion history of the universe to constrain dark energy.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  21. #1551
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Ocean Shores, Wa
    Posts
    5,638
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Now for some Local Group news, starting with two galaxies I grew up believing were Local Group members (they aren't, but they're close), a look at the gas bridge between the Magellanic Clouds and the Milky Way (which turns out to be a major problem), and ending with a great paper on the Milky Way's satellite galaxies.

    ===
    ===

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1901.05636

    The Magellanic System: the puzzle of the leading gas stream

    Thor Tepper-García, Joss Bland-Hawthorn, Marcel S. Pawlowski, Tobias K. Fritz (Submitted on 17 Jan 2019)
    Quote Originally Posted by Tepper-Garcia
    Overall, it seems difficult to escape the conclusion that there is something fundamental about the Magellanic System and the gaseous structure of the Galaxy that we do not yet understand.
    The first step is realizing that the currently accepted rules cannot accommodate observational data. It is the only way to move beyond the belief that the earth has existed for no more than six thousand years, or that the universe is constrained to thirteen billion.
    “It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts.” ― Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes

  22. #1552
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,942
    A falling galaxy generates an enormous wake.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1902.05089

    Hunting for the Dark Matter Wake Induced by the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Nicolas Garavito-Camargo, Gurtina Besla, Chervin F.P Laporte, Kathryn V. Johnston, Facundo A. Gómez, Laura L. Watkins (Submitted on 13 Feb 2019)

    Satellite galaxies are predicted to generate gravitational density wakes as they orbit within the dark matter (DM) halos of their hosts, causing their orbits to decay over time. The recent infall of the Milky Way's (MW) most massive satellite galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), affords us the unique opportunity to study this process in action. In this work, we present high-resolution (M dm = 4 × 10^4 M⊙) N-body simulations of the MW-LMC interaction over the past 2 Gyr. We quantify the impact of the LMC's passage on the density and kinematics of the MW's DM halo and the observability of these structures in the MW's stellar halo. The LMC is found to generate pronounced Local and Global wakes in both the DM and stellar halos, leads to both local overdensities and distinct kinematic patterns that should be observable with ongoing and future surveys. Specifically, the Global Wake will result in redshifted radial velocities of stars in the North and blueshifts in the South, at distances larger than 45 kpc. The Local Wake traces the orbital path of the LMC through the halo (50-200 kpc), resulting in a stellar overdensity with a distinct, tangential kinematic pattern that persists to the present day. The detection of the MW's halo response will constrain: the infall mass of the LMC and its orbital trajectory, the mass of the MW, and it may inform us about the nature of the dark matter particle itself.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  23. #1553
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,942
    Calling all cosmologists -- something for you to read on your lunch hour. Wasn't sure what interest there would be in this, but it is fairly broad and comprehensive. Could be worth a look.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/1902.05286

    Cosmic Inflation: Trick or Treat?

    Jerome Martin (Submitted on 14 Feb 2019)

    Discovered almost forty years ago, inflation has become the leading paradigm for the early universe. Originally invented to avoid the fine-tuning puzzles of the standard model of cosmology, the so-called hot Big Bang phase, inflation has always been the subject of intense debates. In this article, after a brief review of the theoretical and observational status of inflation, we discuss the criticisms that have been expressed against it and attempt to assess whether inflation can really be viewed as a successful solution to the above mentioned issues.

    Comments: 87 pages, 18 figures, to be published in the book "Fine Tuning in the Physical Universe" published by Cambridge University Press
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  24. #1554
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,942
    Exomoon or not for Kepler-1625? Hard to tell.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1902.06018

    An alternative interpretation of the exomoon candidate signal in the combined Kepler and Hubble data of Kepler-1625

    René Heller, Kai Rodenbeck, Giovanni Bruno (Submitted on 16 Feb 2019)

    Kepler and Hubble photometry of a total of four transits by the Jupiter-sized Kepler-1625b have recently been interpreted to show evidence of a Neptune-sized exomoon. The profound implications of this first possible exomoon detection and the physical oddity of the proposed moon, that is, its giant radius prompt us to re-examine the data and the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) used for detection. We combine the Kepler data with the previously published Hubble light curve. In an alternative approach, we perform a synchronous polynomial detrending and fitting of the Kepler data combined with our own extraction of the Hubble photometry. We generate five million MCMC realizations of the data with both a planet-only model and a planet-moon model and compute the BIC difference (DeltaBIC) between the most likely models, respectively. DeltaBIC values of -44.5 (using previously published Hubble data) and -31.0 (using our own detrending) yield strongly support the exomoon interpretation. Most of our orbital realizations, however, are very different from the best-fit solutions, suggesting that the likelihood function that best describes the data is non-Gaussian. We measure a 73.7min early arrival of Kepler-1625b for its Hubble transit at the 3 sigma level, possibly caused by a 1 day data gap near the first Kepler transit, stellar activity, or unknown systematics. The radial velocity amplitude of a possible unseen hot Jupiter causing Kepler-1625b's transit timing variation could be some 100m/s. Although we find a similar solution to the planet-moon model as previously proposed, careful consideration of its statistical evidence leads us to believe that this is not a secure exomoon detection. Unknown systematic errors in the Kepler/Hubble data make the DeltaBIC an unreliable metric for an exomoon search around Kepler-1625b, allowing for alternative interpretations of the signal.
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2019-Feb-19 at 04:12 PM. Reason: clarification
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  25. #1555
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,942
    Lalande 21185 (Gliese 411) appears to have a planet after all. This study appears to support an earlier detection of possible planet in last two years or so, but actually modifies/refutes it, adding new information.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1902.06004

    The SOPHIE search for northern extrasolar planets. XIV. A temperate (T eq ∼300 K) super-earth around the nearby star Gliese 411

    R. F. Díaz, et al. (Submitted on 15 Feb 2019)

    Periodic radial velocity variations in the nearby M-dwarf star Gl411 are reported, based on measurements with the SOPHIE spectrograph. Current data do not allow us to distinguish between a 12.95-day period and its one-day alias at 1.08 days, but favour the former slightly. The velocity variation has an amplitude of 1.6 m/s, making this the lowest-amplitude signal detected with SOPHIE up to now. We have performed a detailed analysis of the significance of the signal and its origin, including extensive simulations with both uncorrelated and correlated noise, representing the signal induced by stellar activity. The signal is significantly detected, and the results from all tests point to its planetary origin. Additionally, the presence of an additional acceleration in the velocity time series is suggested by the current data. On the other hand, a previously reported signal with a period of 9.9 days, detected in HIRES velocities of this star, is not recovered in the SOPHIE data. An independent analysis of the HIRES dataset also fails to unveil the 9.9-day signal. If the 12.95-day period is the real one, the amplitude of the signal detected with SOPHIE implies the presence of a planet, called Gl411 b, with a minimum mass of around three Earth masses, orbiting its star at a distance of 0.079 AU. The planet receives about 3.5 times the insolation received by Earth, which implies an equilibrium temperature between 255 K and 350 K, and makes it too hot to be in the habitable zone. At a distance of only 2.5 pc, Gl411 b, is the third closest low-mass planet detected to date. Its proximity to Earth will permit probing its atmosphere with a combination of high-contrast imaging and high-dispersion spectroscopy in the next decade.
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2019-Feb-19 at 04:11 PM. Reason: correction
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  26. #1556
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,942
    The SEVENTH inner moon of Neptune has been found! Thank you, HST.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-0909-9

    The seventh inner moon of Neptune
    M. R. Showalter, I. de Pater, J. J. Lissauer & R. S. French
    Nature, volume 566, pages 350–353 (2019)
    Letter | Published: 20 February 2019

    Here we report Hubble Space Telescope observations of a seventh inner moon [of Neptune], Hippocamp. It is smaller than the other six, with a mean radius of about 17 kilometres. We also observe Naiad, Neptune’s innermost moon, which was last seen in 1989, and provide astrometry, orbit determinations and size estimates for all the inner moons, using an analysis technique that involves distorting consecutive images to compensate for each moon’s orbital motion and that is potentially applicable to searches for other moons and exoplanets. Hippocamp orbits close to Proteus, the outermost and largest of these moons, and the orbital semimajor axes of the two moons differ by only ten per cent. Proteus has migrated outwards because of tidal interactions with Neptune. Our results suggest that Hippocamp is probably an ancient fragment of Proteus, providing further support for the hypothesis that the inner Neptune system has been shaped by numerous impacts.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 2011-Dec-14, 05:28 PM
  2. Why does arXiv ban people?
    By Noble Ox in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 2009-Nov-15, 07:02 PM
  3. Something Strange Going on at arxiv.org
    By Celestial Mechanic in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 2009-Jul-09, 01:33 PM
  4. Is anyone willing to support a BAUT member in arXiv?
    By john hunter in forum Space/Astronomy Questions and Answers
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 2007-Aug-18, 10:28 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •