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Thread: Fun Papers In Arxiv

  1. #301
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    Fun papers which appeared on the evening of Sep 19: pulsars, planets, and too few pretty pictures in the IR.

    Pulsars: There are three papers describing the discovery of new pulsars in two different radio surveys.

    The Green Bank Telescope 350 MHz Drift-scan Survey I: Survey Observations and the Discovery of 13 Pulsars is the first of a pair of papers; this one describes the parameters of the survey, the methods used to find the pulsars, and the basic properties of the 13 new pulsars. The companion paper, The Green Bank Telescope 350 MHz Drift-scan Survey II: Data Analysis and the Timing of 10 New Pulsars, Including a Relativistic Binary focuses on the timing properties of 10 of these new pulsars, including one which is part of a close white-dwarf/neutron-star binary.

    The Pulsar Search Collaboratory: Discovery and Timing of Five New Pulsars describes a DIFFERENT survey made with the same telescope (the Green Bank Telescope), covering a somewhat smaller area on the sky. The interesting thing about this paper (for me) is the fact that some of the data analysis was done by high-school students.

    Planets: Two papers which involve stellar systems with exoplanets.

    Stellar companions to exoplanet host stars: Lucky Imaging of transiting planet hosts discusses the search in systems which are known to have transiting exoplanets for additional stellar objects. "Lucky imaging" refers to a technique in which one acquires hundreds or thousands of short-exposure images of a system and, basically, discards all but the sharpest 5% or 10% of the pictures; combining those few really good images can yield very high angular resolution.

    Colors of extreme exoEarth environments claims that one can learn quite a bit about the surface properties of a terrestrial exoplanet using only optical broad-band photometry. I am a bit skeptical, but please read the paper yourself and consider the authors' arguments.

    Finally, there's a short conference proceedings paper describing the results of an all-sky survey by the mid-infrared AKARI satellite: AKARI Far-Infrared All-Sky Survey Maps. There are a few small reproductions of the all-sky maps at different mid-IR wavelengths, and just two selected closeups of some regions of the sky. The authors must have plenty of additional beautiful images, so, if you like the teeny bits you can see in this paper, look them up and see if their project web pages have additional examples. I couldn't find a URL to the data in the paper; maybe you'll have better luck!

  2. #302
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    Papers archived Friday, Sep 21 2012

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.4434 THREE DIMENSIONAL FILAMENTATION ANALYSIS OF SDSS DR5
    I was hoping this paper would have more pictures than formulas; but it doesn't. Authors a little difficult to follow - the essence of the paper is that simple (round cow) models don't capture the full weirdness of large scale structure.

    http://arxiv.org/pdf/1209.4377v1.pdf Faint Submillimter Galaxy Counts at 450 micron
    Extra galactic background light is arguably the most difficult field of AP research: Everything is bumping up against the confusion limit. To quote Zeba - it is looking for needles in a stack of needles. This paper is a LONG download unless you have great bandwidth, but if you do - it is fun to see the graphic limits of what submm research is all about.

    http://arxiv.org/pdf/1209.4371.pdf IMPLICATIONS AND APPLICATIONS OF KINEMATIC GALAXY SCALING RELATIONS
    Wouldn't it have been fun to have a theory that actually predicted the Tully-Fisher relationship? Zaritsky looks at some of the unexpected relationships, such as the fundamental plane, and surmises - what? We need some new rules, because somebody has some s'plaining to do.

    http://arxiv.org/pdf/1209.4358v1.pdf Planet-Disk interaction in 3D: the importance of buoyancy waves - Disk brakes? It is surprising how much more torque loading a disk places on a planet when the wave structrue within the rings is analysed.
    “It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts.” ― Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes

  3. #303
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    From 24 September 2012

    There are 52 papers today (Monday), not counting replacements.

    Topcis: *Ionized Gas in the Milky Way, Metal Poor at z=2.54, Unclassified Transients*

    *Ionized Gas in the Milky Way* http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.4640 Another study of the interstellar medium... but this one... umm OK, this is just a little more detail about an interesting topic, and looks specifically at the MW's halo out to 10 Kpc, looking at Hydrogen, Carbon, Nitrogen, Oxygen, and Sulfur in the light from globular clusters, and determines the average energies (temperatures) required to keep these species ionized to the degree they are, and finds column densities for the above, including an inferred column density for neutral Hydrogen.

    *Metal Poor Gas at z=2.54* http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.4676 How do supermassive black holes form/grow? When did it happen? Here's some anecdotal information. The 10.4 meter GTC (Canaries) was used to look at the spectrum of a radio loud quasar in the middle of a collapsing Lyman Alpha blob, and discovers that it is surrounded by extremely low metalicity gas (some stellar outflow has touched it, but not much). The quasar seems to have between 10 and 100 solar masses of gas per year falling into it, which is about the most that should ever be expected for a quasar. The state of the non-metalic gas tells us this is a very new galaxy.

    *Unclassified Transients* http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.4699 The Palomar Transient Factory finds about 20 new transients (supernovae etc.) per night - which is incredibly successful!, but only has time to do followup on about 2 per night... which seems like a waste. This is being solved by the addition of a new instrument which is a dedicated rainbow-camera spectrograph... called the SED.
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  4. #304
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    From 26 September 2012

    There are 57 papers today (Wednesday), not counting replacements. Lots of papers about pulsars.

    Topcis: *Old Stream, No Missing Satellites, Asteroid Collision, DM with IACTs*

    *Old Stream* http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.5391 Lots of efforts to map the (Dark and Normal) matter density in our galaxy and it halo. This team has found a stream of old stars about 250 light years wide and 18,000 light years long about 80,000 light years roughly toward M33. It appears to be a 12 billion year old globular cluster that has been tidally disrupted (by what!?!) and has made a journey out of our galaxy. The details of the proper motions and peculiar velocities of the individual stars in the stream collectively promise to tell a story providing some strong constraints on the distribution of matter in the halo.

    *No Missing Satellites* http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.5394 One of the things I hear from people that don't like current (dark matter) cosmology is how simulations show that there should be many more satellite galaxies for the Milky Way and M31 than we see. Another related thing is how dark matter halos should be very cuspy. This paper is about a simulation that includes some normal physical situations involving baryons and photon pressure, and observes the flattening of cusps, and the elimination of matter from the smallest of the dwarfs, and results in numbers of satellites consistent with what is currently observed.

    *Asteroid Collision* http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.5450 P/2012 F5 Gibbs is a recently discovered comet in the outer main belt, with a tail about a quarter the width of of the full Moon as seen from Earth (7 minutes). The tail is unusually narrow, and the nucleus' orbit is a nearly circular one, about 3 AU out. It is a rock a couple miles in diamter. This paper looks at the evidence that this 'comet' is a result of an asteroid being hit by a smaller asteroid earlier this year.

    *DM with IACTs* http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.5589 I'm interested in the search for Dark Matter, and I'm entertained by the increasing capabilities of the Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes. What if they could somehow both be in the same paper! Here they are... though reading it was less exciting than I'd hoped. It is a proposal to use IACTs (which are already pretty well booked) to look for the single energy gamma sources between say 30 GeV and 30 TeV. The paper discusses techniques to discriminate signal from noise while looking for signals similar to the Fermi-LAT 130 GeV signal, but with a much larger instrument.
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  5. #305
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    Fun papers which appeared on the evening of September 26, in a batch of 52 new papers for the day: objects in our solar system, in other solar systems, and at high redshift all take a bow.

    In our solar system:

    Neutrino Astronomy with the IceCube Observatory provides a review of neutrino astronomy and an update on the work done by the IceCube instrument, which is immersed in the solid ice of Antarctica.

    The return of the Andromedids meteor shower discusses the origin of very strong meteor showers which appeared in 1872 and 1885; the authors find that the parent body was also responsible for the meteor shower observed in December, 2011. It's a detective story, with astronomers trying to track down the source of the meteors.

    Preliminary Analysis of WISE/NEOWISE 3-Band Cryogenic and Post-Cryogenic Observations of Main Belt Asteroids describes observations of many asteroids in the thermal infrared by the WISE satellite. Since the luminosity of objects at these wavelengths is dominated by thermal emission, which depends on the temperature (which we know pretty well) and the size of the object, we can use the WISE data to improve our estimates of the sizes of tens of thousands of asteroids.

    In other solar systems:

    How fast do Jupiters grow? Signatures of the snowline and growth rate in the distribution of gas giant planets examines the observational evidence for the theory that planets of the gas-giant variety form at large distances from their stars and then migrate inward.

    Far far far away :

    Hubble Space Telescope H-alpha imaging of star-forming galaxies at z = 1-1.5: evolution in the size and luminosity of giant HII regions presents some very nice color pictures of galaxies which host star formation. It appears that the properties of HII regions at high redshift are quite different from those we see in our local corner of the universe.

    Numerical Simulations of the Dark Universe: State of the Art and the Next Decade is a review article on numerical simulations in cosmology. It's pretty long, at 52 pages, but after all, it has to summarize a lot of work.

  6. #306
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    Fun Papers from arXiv - From 25 Sep 2012

    CATEGORIES: EXOPLANETS, LIGHT STUFF, ART

    For once, I decided to start with an astronomy paper! This is a big one about exoplanet composition, with some focus on Earth-like planets with water. I know a few people who would be interested in this, since it models these things according to host star composition. This gives SF worldbuilders a way to decide what nearby stars have naturally occurring human habitable worlds.

    ---

    EXOPLANETS

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.5125 - The Compositional Diversity of Extrasolar Terrestrial Planets: II. Migration Simulations

    This dense, data heavy paper models exoplanet composition, taking into consideration planet migration. It includes a lot of details that may be of particular interest to SF world-building. In particular, the choices for representative stars gives insight into different star composition "types". The discussions of Earth-like planets and water delivery are directly relevant to SF world-builders interested in rating stars on their likely-hood of hosting Earth-like planets. (By Earth-like, I mean planets which miraculously are naturally habitable to humans without terraforming or space suits or anything. This doesn't pass my own WSOD, but apparently no one else but me cares.)


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.5323 - Exomoon habitability constrained by illumination and tidal heating

    A few weeks ago, Heller posted http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.0050 - "Exomoon habitability constrained by energy flux and orbital stability". That was a short little paper.

    This paper is lengthy, detailed, and full of wonderful diagrams and graphs. It studies the sources of energy flux used in that other paper--namely, sunlight, planet-light, and tidal heating.

    ---

    LIGHT STUFF

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.4993 - Optical black hole lasers

    This fascinating paper, heavily laden with enlightening graphs, explores the possibility and unusual characteristics of a black hole laser. It's not purely theoretical either, since black hole analogues could be used. Still, it's not like we're talking about a practical planet-killing superlaser.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.4907 - Closing the window for massive photons

    A short and sweet paper showing photons have mass zero.

    ---

    ART

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.5113 - The Center is Everywhere

    This brief paper describes an artistic sculpture of glass crystal, lamps, and brass rods based on SDSS data.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.4991 - THE STARGATE SWITCH

    This paper is about a mind-switching machine which will only work once for a particular pair of bodies. If you're like me, you're aware of the Futurama episode which featured this mathematical conundrum, but you're not aware of the Stargate episode which featured it a decade earlier.

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    Papers Archived Friday, September 28

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.6053 The Fermi-GBM X-ray burst monitor: thermonuclear bursts from 4U 0614+09 This is a nice, close look at a powerful burst from a neutron star. I am always interested when the authors state that what had the appearance of a bimodal distribution is looking more like a continuum with, what else? Selection effects giving us a disproportionate number of higher energy events.

    http://arxiv.org/pdf/1209.6347.pdf RESULTS AND PERSPECTIVES OF THE SOLAR AXION SEARCH WITH
    THE CAST EXPERIMENT
    More null results? Apparently - New limits on where and what Axions can be...if they be.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.6287 Nonlinear magnetic response of the magnetized vacuum to applied electric fieldThis one caught my eye because the title is nonsensical. But it is ok to have a magnetized vacuum dealing with non-linear charges....and I still don't know where to go with this.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.6320 The Unprecedented Third Outburst of SN 2009ip A Luminous Blue Variable Becomes a Supernova I didn't get to post this last night because my laptop topped out; but it is a great if not pivotal paper on what turns out to be a very different progenitor to a supernova event than anyone expected.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.6157 Very Massive Stars and the Eddington Limit Well, why not. If stars don't become supernova the way we were always taught, perhaps they don't weigh in the way we expect them to, either.
    Last edited by Jerry; 2012-Sep-29 at 03:15 AM. Reason: add more papers
    “It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts.” ― Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes

  8. #308
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    From 01 October 2012

    There are 35 papers today (Monday), not counting replacements. There were quite a few papers about the Sun and Sun-like stars, especially as pertains to magnetic fields.

    Topcis: *Planetaries Tell Tales, Distance Measurement Overview, Changing Lambda*

    *Planetaries Tell Tales* http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.6360 There are a lot of interesting patterns in the envelopes around evolved stars. They must tell us something. This paper looks at a new method of looking at thall of this, and telling us something about this mass-range of evolved binaries.

    *Distance Measurement Overview* http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.6529 IAU Conference 289 was about measuring distances. This paper is a summary of the conference looking both at the state of the art, and ahead to what can be expected in the next decade.

    *Changing Lambda* http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.6590 Most current LCDM models of the universe have assumed (for simplicity) that L (Lambda) is constant. We are finally at a point where at the fuzzy edge of our detecting capability, we might be able to tell if Lambda is changing. This paper takes a look, especially using very distant GRBs (out to about z=8), along with other less recent observations, and makes a case for time-varying Lambda.
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  9. #309
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    From 03 October 2012

    There are 79 papers today (Wednesday), not counting replacements. There are more papers than usual about star-formation histories of galaxies.

    Topcis: *ExoAtmosphere, Cat's Eye, (N)FW, Asteroid Dimensions, Brown Dwarf Leftovers *

    *ExoAtmosphere* http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.0531 They said we should be able to do it (eventually), and now it might have been done. This team has examined the spectrum of 55 Cancri very carefully while 55 Cnc-b is and is not transiting it, and have made some preliminary measurements of the absorbtion of the atmosphere of the planet. These observations show an extended atmosphere of Hydrogen. Nothing else detectable is in sufficient quantity to show up, but even the primary species Hydrogen is hard to detect, so this doesn't rule anything out. Future instruments will tell us more.

    *Cat's Eye* http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.0533 Two days ago I picked a paper about studying the envelopes around evolved binaries. This paper is about the specific, very geometric Cat's Eye nebula (a planetary). This paper studies the nebula, and creates a model for the central star, and its past and current behavior.

    *(N)FW* http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.0544 This is an overview paper on Cosmic Structure by Frenk and White. It caught my eye because of the Authors.

    *Asteroid DImensions* http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.0716 What is the distribution of asteroid dimensions? This paper uses a Pareto chart to show it... which caught my eye simply because I taught who to create and format a Pareto chart just yesterday... AND the question is interesting to me.

    *Brown Dwarf Leftovers* http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.0879 What happens to a Brown Dwarf/Hot SuperJupiter when it gets engulfed in a parent star's red-giant phase? Does it survive? This paper looks at this question, and also at planets around white dwarfs.
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  10. #310
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    For 4 October 2012

    First off, thanks to Stupendous Man for covering for me while I was in the hills of Virginia.

    Large release today with 85 papers 59 are new, 8 cross posted, with 18 replacements. As for multiple papers, There was a group of 12 papers presented at the Science with Parkes@ 50 Years Young conference, on the 50th Anniversary of the Parkes Observatory in Austrailia. Three papers on magnetic fields on active areas on the sun. Multiple papers on dust and gas from dust grains up to gas reactions in cluster mergers, and finally, several papers on Neutron stars one on surfaces and the other on interiors. For those who want to check out these and other papers not listed, they can find them here

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.0927 Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays: Review of the Current Situation
    Todor Stanev

    I like these reviews, as the provide the most up to date thinking or data.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.1041 Magnetic Penrose Process and Blanford-Zanejk mechanism: A clarification
    Naresh Dadhich

    A quick (4 pages of info), math free, explanation of both of the above mechanisms that can power AGN.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.1050 Tidal disruption flares from stars on eccentric orbits
    Kimitake Hayasaki, Nicholas Stone, Abraham Loeb

    A short, but not math free, finding that stellar objects bound to supermassive black holes have a faster mass fallback rate than those on parabolic orbits.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.1159 On the Systematic Bias in the Estimation of Black Hole Masses in Active Galactic Nuclei
    Wang Jian-Guo, Dong Xiaobo

    I found this interesting as both authors were a part of paper in 2009 that found a method to estimate the mass of SMBH in AGN. In this paper, they find and explain how different variables (spin of the Black Hole, composition of the accretion disk, size of the accretion disk, etc) can cause bias in the estimation of the mass.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.1167 A Shapiro delay detection in the binary system hosting the millisecond pulsar PSR J1910-5959A
    Corongiu, et al

    While it isn’t all that math intensive, it is rather detailed. It explains the observation of the amount of the Shapiro delay in the pulsar signal helped determine the mass of the companion.

  11. #311
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    Fun Papers from arXiv - From 02 Oct 2012

    CATEGORIES: EXOPLANETS, MISC

    Not many papers caught my fancy this time. I do love the use of the name "Ragnarok" in the white dwarf exoplanet paper, though!

    ---

    EXOPLANETS

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.0328 - FORETELLINGS OF RAGNAROK: WORLD-ENGULFING ASYMPTOTIC GIANTS AND THE INHERITANCE OF WHITE DWARFS

    This heavy paper discusses a topic I find fascinating--exoplanets hosted by white dwarfs. They consider what planets may be expected to survive the host star's red giant phase, and what's left of those which do survive.

    ---

    MISC

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.0443 - Ultrarelativistic black hole formation

    This paper analyzes how to form a black hole with an ultrarelativistic collision. If you want to try this at home, good luck with that!


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.0489 - Do the Herschel cold clouds in the Galactic halo embody its dark matter?

    This paper presents a dark matter theory of MACHOs which may have been missed in microlensing searches because they're large enough to not microlense.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.0082 - Who cares about physics today? A marketing strategy for the survival of fundamental science and the benefit of society

    This paper discusses how to make physics "cool". This is obviously a challenge compared to fields like astronomy, which have more visual appeal.

  12. #312
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    Fun Papers, Friday, Oct 4, 2012

    Fistful of papers and some more bad puns, just for the phun of it:


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.1210 On the association of the ultraluminous X-ray sources in the Antennae galaxies with young stellar clusters
    Like cosmic rays, ULXS's are up in the air: We don't know what makes them. The Antennae galaxies kick out a lot of them, so this is a good place to start. Since we are able to correlate sources with young star forming regions, the 'mid-sized' black hole theory takes one on the noggin.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.1214 The runaway instability in general-relativistic accretion disks
    Nice to see a model successfully go where none have ever gone before: Inside the accretion disk of a runaway black hole..and run away with it.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.1215 The faster the narrower: characteristic bulk velocities and jet opening angles of Gamma Ray Bursts
    Well, the title says it all; but again it is nice to have a model that demonstrates the tighter the nozzle in the firehose, the higher the velocity of the fluid.

    http://arxiv.org/pdf/1206.5532.pdf The Optical SN2012bz Associated with the Long GRB120422A⋆
    Interesting, because the this gamma burst emitter has a light curve that is ichingly close to supernova type Ia lightcurves. Is it possible Ia's release gamma rays that we could see if the veiwing angle is exactly right?

    Almost missed this one:

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.1213 Column density distribution and cosmological mass density of neutral gas: Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III Data Release 9 Only modest evolution in neutral hydrogen density? Curious, in a dynamic fuel-driven universe - what are we missing guys?
    Last edited by Jerry; 2012-Oct-05 at 02:03 PM.
    “It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts.” ― Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes

  13. #313
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    From 08 October 2012

    There are 35 papers today (Monday), not counting replacements.

    Topcis: *Cluster-pause, Starspots, AQuEye*

    *Cluster-pause* http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.1574 So what happens to the stuff blowing out of galaxy clusters when it hits intercluster space? You get something sort of like the heliopause, only its around a cluster. This paper this paper is about the 15 million lightyear diameter sphere around the Coma Cluster. There are ways in which it is not like the heliopause, but I think it helps convey the idea.

    *Starspots* http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.1676 Kepler-17 has a hot Juptier transiting it five times a week. It is a young Sun-like star, and because of the transits, we are able to observe something about its sunspots (or Kepler-17-spots). This star has 10-15 times as much of its surface area covered with spots as does the Sun, but the spots last about as long as ours do.

    *AQuEye* http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.1796 There is a really cool instrument called the Asiago Quantum Eye which is a high speed detector used in visible light. This paper is about how it was recently used to measure the time-light curve of the Crab pulsar and determined the period of the pulsar to within 1.2 picoseconds in only two days of observation. This kind of measurement is an improvement, and can potentially show us finer variations in pulsar behavior, which can tell us more about their interiors as they cool.
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  14. #314
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    From 10 October 2012

    There are 63 papers today (Wednesday), not counting replacements.

    Topcis: *Void Catalog, Measuring Voids, Tycho Double Degenerate*

    *Void Catalog* http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.2432 This paper looks through the SDSS and finds about 500 voids and catalogs them in terms of size, sphericalness, and other properties, and compares these to what we are finding in simulations... some modest discrepencies are found. This is a preliminary effort that migh spur more detailed studies.

    *Measuring Voids* http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.2446 Voids' properties (including mass distribution) should be measureable using the next generation of instruments looking at the weak lensing properties of voids. This paper looks at the limits of what we might be able to tell about them using these thechniques.

    *Tycho Double Degenerate* http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.2713 Tycho's SUpernova in 1572 was a Type 1a event. In the last year or so there's been an increasing amount of research indicating that many (the majority perhaps) of these events are not from one white dwarf stealing material from a normal companion, but rather from two white dwarfs merging. This paper is about a high resolution search for the donor star in the 1572 event, which comes up empty, and is detailed enough to conclude there was no surviving donor.
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  15. #315
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    For 11 October 2012

    Large release today with 97 papers 66 are new, 4 cross posted, with 27 replacements. As for multiple papers, there are seven papers on the engineering and operating aspects of the future instrument for the Subaru telescope, the Prime Focus Spectrograph. A couple on the narrow line region in AGN. A couple on some cosmological models, several on magnetic fields and active regions on the sun. For those who want to check out these and other papers not listed, they can find them here

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.3013 Tentative observation of a gamma-ray line at the Fermi LAT
    Christoph Weniger

    Report on another observation of the 130 GeV line at a 4.6 sigma significance. The question is whether the Fermi Large Area Telescope is reliable at these high energies, due to the low number of events.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.2746 The Galactic Millisecond Pulsar Population
    Duncan R. Lorimer

    This paper give a good overview on subject. There are now more MP known in the galaxy than there are in the Globular Clusters where they were first found. The paper includes modeling showing possible distributions of the various pulsar parameters.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.2785 Evidence for fresh frost layer on the bare nucleus of comet Hale--Bopp at 32 AU distance
    Gy. M. Szabó, L. L. Kiss, A. Pál, Cs. Kiss, K. Sárneczky, A. Juhász, M. R. Hogerheijde

    As the title says. A possible reason could be as the ejection activity decreased, ending at 28 AU, the gas velocity at ejection was lower than the escape velocity of the bare nucleus. Redepositing the frozen ejecta back onto the surface.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.3011 Primordial Synthesis: F-SU(5) SUSY Multijets, 145-150 GeV LSP, Proton & Rare Decays, 125 GeV Higgs Boson, and WMAP7
    Tianjun Li, James A. Maxin, Dimitri V. Nanopoulos, Joel W. Walker

    An update of the 7 TeV with the 8 TeV data run results, comparing the results with a beyond standard model F-SU(5) SUSY model. They then compare how the model compares to the primordial element synthesis measurements. Not a lot of math, but very technical.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.2717 Cosmological origin of anomalous radio background
    James M. Cline, Aaron C. Vincent

    This paper looks at the possible excess radio background that some experiments have reported and at serveral models that attempt to explain it.

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    Papers Acchived Friday, October 12 2012

    Nice catches last night, Tensor - I hope to see follow-up threads on a couple.

    Here's one if you are keep score on the Supernova type Ia source debate:

    http://arxiv.org/pdf/1210.3027.pdf No Stripped Hydrogen in the Nebular Spectra of Nearby Type Ia Supernova 2011fe
    No obvious hydrogen ribbon is inconsistent with single source scenario. This is interesting, but it is also only one observation.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.3347 The Rise of the Remarkable Type IIn Supernova SN 2009ip
    We have a thread flaying out there on this topic - this is a choice, depthy set of observations.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.3273 Searches for high-energy neutrino emission in the Galaxy with the combined IceCube-AMANDA detector
    Ouch! Another new set of constraints on distant sources of neutrinos. Nobody expected it to be this hard to confirm something so relatively easy to coax out of our own sun. Pierre Auger isn't having much luck finding the little buggers either: http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.3143

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.3067 The Three-Dimensional Shapes of Galaxy Clusters
    Interesting...Do we observe a higher percentage of galaxy clusters in the deep past...is this because there were more clusters in the past, or is there a self-lensing effect that exaggerates the difference between local and warp-drive space?
    “It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts.” ― Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes

  17. #317
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    Just so you know--I'm still doing this last Tuesday's entry. It takes me at least two solid nights of work to get one of these done, and it's difficult sometimes when the kids aren't sleeping well.

    I do wonder sometimes how many people read/enjoy these entries. It's an important part of my life, since it's pretty much the only thing that I do that anyone cares about. But still, I'd guess that only 2-3 people really read my entries, and maybe I only point out 1 paper a week that they wouldn't have found out about through other means, anyway. It seems like a small benefit for 5-8 hours of work.

  18. #318
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    From 15 October 2012

    There are 58 papers today (Monday), not counting replacements.

    Topcis: *Properties of A1689, Jeans Swindle, M33 in 21cm*

    *Properties of Abell 1689* http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.3359 We are still in the early days of being able to tell how the mass (and matter) in galaxy clusters is distributed, but there are several ways to do it. This paper uses x-rays, lensing, and the SZ effect to look at the cluster Abell 1689 to find the mass, distribution, and thermal properties... and how these measurements vary by technique. All of this is important for developing techniques of studying clusters to put together models of how they form.

    *Jeans Swindle* http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.3363 I hadn't heard of Jeans Swindle before. It is the idea that we do not consider background density when studying structure of voids and superclusters... even though this could potentially have a divergent term (hence, the swindle). This paper shows that taking the expansion of the universe into account cancels the divergent term, making internal kinematics legit as a tool for studying structure.

    *M33 in 21cm* http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.3459 Our ability to map details in 21cm radiation is improving, though it is pretty much the grandfather of all radio astronomy. This paper takes a look at distribution of neutral Hydrogen (the source of the 21cm radiation) in our near neighbor galaxy M33, revealing some interesting structures (arcs and clumps) that may help tell us about the history of this galaxy, and by extension many spiral galaxies.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  19. #319
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    Quote Originally Posted by IsaacKuo View Post
    Just so you know--I'm still doing this last Tuesday's entry. It takes me at least two solid nights of work to get one of these done, and it's difficult sometimes when the kids aren't sleeping well.

    I do wonder sometimes how many people read/enjoy these entries. It's an important part of my life, since it's pretty much the only thing that I do that anyone cares about. But still, I'd guess that only 2-3 people really read my entries, and maybe I only point out 1 paper a week that they wouldn't have found out about through other means, anyway. It seems like a small benefit for 5-8 hours of work.
    I for one find the work you folks do here extremely valuable, given the veritable tsunami of information currently available, so don't despair, it really is appreciated. That said, did I miss this one on dark matter filaments? http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.4323

  20. #320
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    Fun Papers from arXiv - From 09 Oct 2012

    I'm catching up on last week. Only 17 papers made my first cut, and out of those only three made my second cut.

    ---

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.1847 - Constraints on the Universe as a Numerical Simulation

    This paper is full of stuff I do not understand. Basically, it's about what sort of signatures we might see if the universe were a computer simulation using lattice QCD on a rigid cube grid. Of these concepts, the only one I understand is the concept of a rigid cube grid. The most stringent constraint they found involved the spectrum of the highest energy cosmic rays.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.2219 - Analysis of the rotation period of asteroids (1865) Cerberus, (2100) Ra-Shalom, and (3103) Eger - search for the YORP effect

    While this paper is about a search for the YORP effect, I was more interested by the way they used an already established technique of the lightcurve inversion method to derive the asteroids' shape and rotation. The paper includes 3d renderings of the derived models.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.2388 - Video De-fencing

    This paper shows an algorithm for removing fence-like occlusions from video. The basic idea is intuitive enough--take advantage of the fact that different parts of the background are exposed as the fence moves past the camera, so you can stitch image fragments from other frames to fill in the blanks.

  21. #321
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    Fun Papers from arXiv - From 16 Oct 2012

    This week there were a bunch of stub papers about high speed camera footage of random stuff, but not a whole lot that caught my eye.

    ---

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.3641 - Teaching introductory STEM with the Marble Game

    This paper shows and studies a way to teach science using a simple dice based simulation of brownian motion. It includes quantitative results of the teaching method, as well as extensive conceptual discussions of the experience and thinking that inspired it.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.3983 - Astrometric determination ofWD radial velocities with Gaia?

    This very short paper describes an idea to use astrometry to determine RADIAL velocity of a white dwarf. Normally, you would only think of astrometry as able to determine the motion perpendicular to us. But the idea here is that the astrometric measurements are so accurate that you can deduce radial motion based on perspective change. An object with linear motion appears to accelerate across one's view if it's getting closer or decelerate if it's getting further away.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.3838 - Terrestrial Planet Evolution in the Stagnant-Lid Regime: Size E ects and the Formation of Self-Destabilizing Crust

    This extensive paper discusses the geological evolution of terrestrial planets with stagnant lid crusts rather than Earth-like plate tectonics. This sort of planet is more common here in our solar system, and perhaps they are more common in general. I wonder if the newly discovered planet orbiting Alpha Centauri B is one of these...

  22. #322
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    From 17 October 2012

    There are 81 (wow!) papers today (Wednesday), not counting replacements.

    Topcis: *Transiting Red Giants, An IMBH, V838 Mon*

    *Transiting Red Giants* http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.4159 We are looking for ways to study the giant black-hole accretion disk systems in the centers of active galaxies, and THIS team has settled on looking through the LSST and Pan-STARRS to try and find examples of Red Giant stars passing between us and the AGNs. They should be there in sufficient quantity, and spend long enough making the transit that we should see some. When we do, we should be able to discern more details about the mass, spin, and perhaps other properties of the AGNs. This is a clever new technique!

    *An IMBH* http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.4169 We are slowly gathering details about the few Intemediate Mass Black Holes we've discovered, and this paper gives some details gleaned about HLX-1, which has had an outburst back in 2010, observed by Swift. Making a few reasonable assumptions the light curve from the brightness of the outburst has given a few specifics about the size of the acretion disk's inner and outer edges, and hence information about the mass and spin of the black hole.

    *V838 Monocerotis* http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.4330 One of the coolest set of images in astronomy in the last twenty years has been the expanding light-echo of V838 Monocerotis. This paper looks at the amount of mass and distribution in the clouds illuminated by the light echo to try and determine its origin... not all of which can be from wind from the B star that gave off the flash in the first place.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  23. #323
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    For 18 October 2012

    A reduction compared to last week with only 66 papers. 46 of which are new, 3 cross posted, with 17 replacements. As for multiple papers, there were several on different aspects of AGN, several on proto-planetary disks (including one looking at planet formation in binary systems), and finally, a couple on magnetic features on the sun. For those who want to check out these and other papers not listed, they can find them here

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.4558 Black hole masses from X-rays
    Xin-Lin Zhou, Roberto Soria

    Two ways to estimate black hole masses from x-rays.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.4570 Exploring the Correlations between Globular Cluster Populations and Supermassive Black Holes in Giant Galaxies
    Katherine L. Rhode

    The author finds that while there is a correlation between the mass of the supermassive central black hole and the number of globular clusters, the is a direct link between the stellar mass and the number of globular clusters.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.4549 2011 HM102: Discovery of a High-Inclination L5 Neptune Trojan in the Search for a post-Pluto New Horizons Target
    Alex H. Parker, et al

    This paper discusses the parameters of 2011 HM102 and also talks about the possibility of detecting the object from New Horizons in 2013, during their closest approach.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.4551 Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission from Large Scale Structures
    Aleksandra Dobardzic, Tijana Prodanovic

    Background gamma ray emission (EGRB) production has been found for several types of sources, but they don’t produce enough to explain all of the EGRB. This paper looks at those sources and they look at several possible models of EGRB by large scale structures that could explain the missing EGRB.

  24. #324
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    Quote Originally Posted by IsaacKuo View Post
    I do wonder sometimes how many people read/enjoy these entries.
    I read/enjoy your, and everyone's, entries.

    When I have time, admittedly, I only go to about 1 in 15 papers, and usually it is just to get a feel of what they are doing and what their conculsion is. However, I do read what y'all have to say about them.

    I would be surprised if more amateurs like me don't read the nice work being done here. Many times I would make a comment or ask a question about some of the papers, but am too lazy to start a new thread over a rudimentary thought.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  25. #325
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    Paper for Friday, 10 Aug 2012

    http://arxiv.org/pdf/1210.4921.pdf Perspectives on Core-Collapse Supernova Theory It took me three days to get enough sleep to digest this one; it is a wordy tumble through the fundamental physics behind a core collapse supernova event. Most interesting, is the argument dispelling the myth that a text supernova cannot collapse directly into a black hole.

    http://arxiv.org/pdf/1210.4933.pdf A LY EMITTER WITH AN EXTREMELY LARGE REST-FRAME EQUIVALENT WIDTH OF  900°A AT
    Z = 6.5: A CANDIDATE OF POPULATION III-DOMINATED GALAXY?
    Are we there yet? Pop III star galaxies should contain a virginal amount of heavy metal. This one seems to fit the bill.

    http://arxiv.org/pdf/1210.4934v1.pdf Where are the Fermi Lines Coming From?
    Good question. Trying to nail down a central galaxy source is a dogging tasks.
    “It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts.” ― Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes

  26. #326
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    From 22 October 2012

    There are 62 papers today (Monday), not counting replacements.

    Topcis: *Pre-planet Dust, IceTop, OSIRIS-REx Target*

    *Pre-planet Dust* http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.5252 AS209 is a pre-main sequence star with a disk (probably forming planets). We would like to know details about how planets form, and when it happens in the young star process. This paper uses various wavelengths of infrared light to get a sense of the size and density of the dust particles at different distances from the star. I'm looking forward to seeing how this technique can be applied to get more detail, but for now, they show that otuside 70AU (twice as far out as Neptune) the particles are sub-millimeter, but inside 70AU, they are mm to cm sized. This is a snapshot of one star. More data on more stars will be interesting.

    *IceTop* http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.5278 First, what is the hole in the Southern high energy sky at RA ~90? IceTop is a system of detectors on the surface of Antarctica that is dtecting cosmic rays. This paper looks at the collected data in the 100s of Tev to several PeV range, and surprisingly, while the sky isn't lumpy in this range, there is a clear area abotu 30 degrees wide of the sky with a distinct paucity of cosmic rays in all energies coming in. Is this because of lack of sources? Something opaque nearby? Something with large-scale magnetic fields? I don't know, but I am very curious.

    *OSIRIS-REx Target* http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.5370 The OSIRIS-REx mission is going to try to do a sample return from asteroid 1999 RQ36. Infrared observations have been made of the asteroid using Herschal, Spitzer, and other instruments, to try and get a better sense of what it is made of. So far, it is about half a kilometer in diameter, and while being much closer to round than Itokawa (the other sampled asteroid), it is probably also a rubble-pile object, making sample collection a likely easy job.
    Last edited by antoniseb; 2012-Oct-24 at 01:12 AM.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  27. #327
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    From 24 October 2012

    There are 63 papers today (Wednesday), not counting replacements.

    Topcis: *Galaxy Proper Motion, M87 Jet Closeup*

    *Galaxy Proper Motion* http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.6039 Leo I is a nearby dwarf galaxy. Careful observations by the Hubble telescope five years apart have shown us how it is moving and gravitationally interacting with the other members of the local group. The details of the measuring are interesting. The maps showing likely past and future positions are fascinating. http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.6046 tells a bit more, using the motion to make an estimate of the total mass of the Milky Way's dark matter halo.

    *M87 Jet Closeup* http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.6132 M87 has a really obvious jet shooting out of its very large central black hole. What mechanism is the source of that jet? We think we have some idea, but it would be nice to see it. This paper is about an interferometric effort with 1.3 mm radio to observe this origin of the jet. It also includes some conclusions about the spin of this particular object. The paper is interesting, but there is no image... just fascinating graphs.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  28. #328
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    For 25 October 2012

    A release of 73 papers this week. 50 new, 3 cross posted, and 20 replacements. Multiple papers include AGN and quasars; molecular clouds, interacting galactic clusters; pulsars, and finally neutrinos associated with Ultra High Cosmic Rays and Gamma Rays. For those who want to check out these and other papers not listed, they can find them here

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.6377 Spectrum of the unresolved cosmic X ray background: what is unresolved 50 years after its discovery
    Moretti, S. Vattakunnel, P.Tozzi, R. Salvaterra, P. Severgnini, D. Fugazza, F. Haardt, R. Gilli

    Last week, there was a paper on background Gamma Ray sources. Interestingly, this week, there is a paper on background X-ray sources, one step down on the EM spectrum. This paper uses data from the Swift and Chandra.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.6353 Supernova Remnant Progenitor Masses in M31
    Zachary G. Jennings et al

    This paper attempts to determine the masses of SN based on the Super Nova Remnants. They also attempt to estimate the minimum mass required for core collapse supernova.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.6368 Our astrochemical heritage
    Paola Caselli, Cecilia Ceccarelli

    This paper looks at small bodies of the solar system (meteorites, comets, asteroids, etc) and compares them to the pre-stellar, protostellar, and protoplanetary phases. This to understand if, and if so, how much we got, chemically from those early phases.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.6404 NSV 11749: Symbiotic Nova, Not a Born-Again Red Giant
    Howard E. Bond, Mansi M. Kasliwal

    This is kinda cool. NSV 11749 was first found in plates at mag 14.5 in 1899. In 1903, it increase in brightness to 12.5 for four years and then declined back down to mag 14.5 by 1911 and down to mag 17 between 1934-49. This was first thought to be a Helium flash creating a “born again” red giant. It would have been only the fourth example viewed. New observations in 2012 confirm it is a symbiotic binary. A white dwarf/red giant pair. The increase in brightness, was a symbiotic nova. A runaway burn of red giant material that fell onto the white dwarf. While not as rare as a helium flash, there are less than a dozen examples known of a symbiotic nova.

  29. #329
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    Papers Archived Friday, October 26

    http://arxiv.org/pdf/1210.6476.pdf On standing sausage waves in photospheric magnetic waveguides

    This is a replacement, but I couldn't avoid the title. Solar magnetic structure is so wonderfully complex and difficult to even try to understand, but it can also be viewed as so many iron filings in a magnetic field, or sausages on a string.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.6909 Unusual Long and Luminous Optical Transient in the Subaru Deep Field
    In the 'who ordered this' department: Another too long, too bright supernova-like event. This one is more vexing than most, at a z shift of 0.6 the light curve took forever to develop.
    “It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts.” ― Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes

  30. #330
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    From 29 Oct 2012

    There are 58 papers today (Monday), not counting replacements. ... BTW, I was delayed a little due to travel impacted by an East Coast storm.

    Topcis: *Like Eta Car, Mapping SMBHs, SW Sex, Old Pulsar*

    *Like Eta Car* http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.6980 Eta Carina is a really huge star (or pair of stars) that are blowing off huge amounts of dust, is at the core of the very recognizable (from Hubble images) Humonculous Nebula, and will someday relatively soon be a whopper of a supernova. It would be interesting to study objects like it in nearby galaxies to get a better sense of its behavior, and perhaps if there is a way to tell how much longer till it explodes in a big way (it has already exploded in lesser ways). This is about the first step in getting a list of Eta Carina analogs using Spitzer. Cool images.

    *Mapping SMBHs* http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.6983 This is kind of a what-if paper writing about something to look for to help test General Relativity, or the competing models for how space and time work close to the event horizon of a black hole. The concept is that you'd like to find a very compact object (stellar black hole or neutron star (a millisecond pulsar would be nice)) that is in a close increasingly plunging orbit around an SMBH. Seeing the behavior of one such object, rather than the collective behavior of disk of objects would isolate the Gravity effects from the Spin/Frame Dragging effects. Is such an object out there? Don't know, but the payoff of finding one is potentially huge and fun to imagine.

    *SW Sex* http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.7145 This paper is titled "The SW Sex Enigma", which, frankly, caught my eye. It is about stars like DW UMa, and SW Sex, which are odd cataclysmic variables with single line feature... spoiler alert: they have a model that explains what they are seeing, which involes these variable having very bright surface features that we see self-eclipsing as the star rotates. True or not, it is an interesting model.

    *Old Pulsar* http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.7179 Most pulsars that we see are either maintained by a partner donating material and angular momentum, or they are fairly young. (Under a million years old). But there must be neutron stars less young than that. This is a study of J0108-1431, which is estimated to be between 100 and 200 million years old. The properties of such an object are intriguing to me because I wonder where the nearest very old neutron star is. This doesn't tell me, but it gives deeper knowledge about the topic.
    Forming opinions as we speak

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