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Thread: Fun Papers In Arxiv

  1. #1621
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    Voyager 1 is still sending home useful data from interstellar space. Good going!

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1905.11990

    Galactic Cosmic-Ray Anisotropies: Voyager 1 in the Local Interstellar Medium

    J. S. Rankin, E. C. Stone, A. C. Cummings, D. J. McComas, N. Lal, B. C. Heikkila (Submitted on 28 May 2019)

    Since crossing the heliopause on August 25, 2012, Voyager 1 observed reductions in galactic cosmic ray count rates caused by a time-varying depletion of particles with pitch angles near 90-deg, while intensities of particles with other pitch angles remain unchanged. Between late 2012 and mid-2017, three large-scale events occurred, lasting from ~100 to ~630 days. Omnidirectional and directional high-energy data from Voyager 1's Cosmic Ray Subsystem are used to report cosmic ray intensity variations. Omnidirectional (greater than ~20 MeV) proton-dominated measurements show up to a 3.8% intensity reduction. Bi-directional (greater than ~70 MeV) proton-dominated measurements taken from various spacecraft orientations provide insight about the depletion region's spatial properties. We characterize the anisotropy as a "notch" in an otherwise uniform pitch-angle distribution of varying depth and width centered about 90 degrees in pitch angle space. The notch averages 22-deg wide and 15% deep - signifying a depletion region that is broad and shallow. There are indications that the anisotropy is formed by a combination of magnetic trapping and cooling downstream of solar-induced transient disturbances in a region that is also likely influenced by the highly compressed fields near the heliopause.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  2. #1622
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    Wow, Titan's atmosphere is really full of.... stuff we can't breathe. Now wondering what sort of exotic life could breathe this soup.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1906.02230

    Retrieval of Chemical Abundances in Titan's Upper Atmosphere from Cassini UVIS Observations with Pointing Motion

    Siteng Fan, Donald E. Shemansky, Cheng Li, Peter Gao, Linfeng Wan, Yuk L. Yung (Submitted on 5 Jun 2019)

    Cassini/UVIS FUV observations of stellar occultations at Titan are well suited for probing its atmospheric composition and structure. However, due to instrument pointing motion, only five out of tens of observations have been analyzed. We present an innovative retrieval method that corrects for the effect of pointing motion by forward modeling the Cassini/UVIS instrument response function with the pointing motion value obtained from the SPICE C-kernel along the spectral dimension. To illustrate the methodology, an occultation observation made during flyby T52 is analyzed, when the Cassini spacecraft had insufficient attitude control. A high-resolution stellar model and an instrument response simulator that includes the position of the point source on the detector are used for the analysis of the pointing motion. The Markov Chain Monte-Carlo method is used to retrieve the line-of-sight abundance profiles of eleven species (CH4, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, C4H2, C6H6, HCN, C2N2, HC3N, C6N2 and haze particles) in the spectral vector fitting process. We obtain tight constraints on all of the species aside from C2H6, C2N2 and C6N2, for which we only retrieved upper limits. This is the first time that the T52 occultation was used to derive abundances of major hydrocarbon and nitrile species in Titan's upper and middle atmosphere, as pointing motion prohibited prior analysis. With this new method, nearly all of the occultations obtained over the entire Cassini mission could yield reliable profiles of atmospheric composition, allowing exploration of Titan's upper atmosphere over seasons, latitudes, and longitudes.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  3. #1623
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    Was our Sun more dangerous and eruptive when it was younger?

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1906.03189

    Modeling a Carrington-scale Stellar Superflare and Coronal Mass Ejection from κ1 (Kappa-1) Cet

    Benjamin J. Lynch, Vladimir S. Airapetian, C. Richard DeVore, Maria D. Kazachenko, Teresa Lüftinger, Oleg Kochukhov, Lisa Rosén, William P. Abbett (Submitted on 7 Jun 2019)

    Observations from the Kepler mission have revealed frequent superflares on young and active solar-like stars. Superflares result from the large-scale restructuring of stellar magnetic fields, and are associated with the eruption of coronal material (a coronal mass ejection, or CME) and energy release that can be orders of magnitude greater than those observed in the largest solar flares. These catastrophic events, if frequent, can significantly impact the potential habitability of terrestrial exoplanets through atmospheric erosion or intense radiation exposure at the surface. We present results from numerical modeling designed to understand how an eruptive superflare from a young solar-type star, κ 1 Cet , could occur and would impact its astrospheric environment. Our data-inspired, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic modeling shows that global-scale shear concentrated near the radial-field polarity inversion line can energize the closed-field stellar corona sufficiently to power a global, eruptive superflare that releases approximately the same energy as the extreme 1859 Carrington event from the Sun. We examine proxy measures of synthetic emission during the flare and estimate the observational signatures of our CME-driven shock, both of which could have extreme space-weather impacts on the habitability of any Earth-like exoplanets. We also speculate that the observed 1986 Robinson-Bopp superflare from κ 1 Cet was perhaps as extreme for that star as the Carrington flare was for the Sun.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  4. #1624
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    Why we might one day discover hypervelocity planets flying out of the Galactic Center. Interesting SF concept, too.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1906.03738

    Dynamical properties of binary stars hosting planets in the Galactic Center

    Nazanin Davari, Roberto Capuzzo-Dolcetta (Submitted on 9 Jun 2019)

    We present some preliminary results of our work about the close encounter of binary stars hosting planets on S-type orbits with the Sgr A* supermassive black hole in the center of our Galaxy.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  5. #1625
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    The implication from this paper is that we will find so many planets around M-dwarfs we will have no idea what to do with them. Time for TERRAFORMING!

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1906.04644

    Frequency of planets orbiting M dwarfs in the Solar neighbourhood

    M. Tuomi, H. R. A. Jones, G. Anglada-Escudé, R. P. Butler, P. Arriagada, S. S. Vogt, J. Burt, G. Laughlin, B. Holden, J. K. Teske, S. A. Shectman, J. D. Crane, I. Thompson, S. Keiser, J. S. Jenkins, Z. Berdiñas, M. Diaz, M. Kiraga, J. R. Barnes (Submitted on 11 Jun 2019)

    The most abundant stars in the Galaxy, M dwarfs, are very commonly hosts to diverse systems of low-mass planets. Their abundancy implies that the general occurrence rate of planets is dominated by their occurrence rate around such M dwarfs. In this article, we combine the M dwarf surveys conducted with the HIRES/Keck, PFS/Magellan, HARPS/ESO, and UVES/VLT instruments supported with data from several other instruments. We analyse the radial velocities of an approximately volume- and brightness-limited sample of 426 nearby M dwarfs in order to search for Doppler signals of candidate planets. In addition, we analyse spectroscopic activity indicators and ASAS photometry to rule out radial velocity signals corresponding to stellar activity as Doppler signals of planets. We calculate estimates for the occurrence rate of planets around the sample stars and study the properties of this occurrence rate as a function of stellar properties. Our analyses reveal a total of 118 candidate planets orbiting nearby M dwarfs. Based on our results accounting for selection effects and sample detection threshold, we estimate that M dwarfs have on average at least 2.39 +4.58 −1.36 planets per star orbiting them. Accounting for the different sensitivities of radial velocity surveys and Kepler transit photometry implies that there are at least 3.0 planets per star orbiting M dwarfs. We also present evidence for a population of cool mini-Neptunes and Neptunes with indications that they are found an order of magnitude more frequently orbiting the least massive M dwarfs in our sample.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  6. #1626
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    Could we get meteors, asteroids, and comets from halo stars in the Milky Way? Probably.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1906.05291

    Halo Meteors

    Amir Siraj, Abraham Loeb (Submitted on 12 Jun 2019)

    The stellar halo contains some of the oldest stars in the Milky Way galaxy and in the universe. The detections of `Oumuamua, CNEOS 2014-01-08, and interstellar dust serve to calibrate the production rate of interstellar objects. We study the feasibility of a search for interstellar meteors with origins in the stellar halo. We find the mean heliocentric impact speed for halo meteors to be ∼270 km s−1, and the standard deviation is ∼90km s−1, making the population kinematically distinct from all other meteors, which are an order-of-magnitude slower. We explore the expected abundance of halo meteors, finding that a network of all-sky cameras covering all land on Earth can take spectra and determine the orbits of a few hundred halo meteors larger than a few mm per year. The compositions of halo meteors would provide information on the characteristics of planetary system formation for the oldest stars. In addition, one could place tight constraints on baryonic dark matter objects of low masses.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  7. #1627
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Was our Sun more dangerous and eruptive when it was younger?

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1906.03189
    could a one-two punch of a CME and a coronal proton ejections (CPE) be lethal?
    https://www.blackmountainnews.com/st...rs/2810941002/

    Or is that hype?

  8. #1628
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    The word for today is: ploonet. It's a moon that becomes a planet. But wouldn't that be a dwarf ploonet?

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1906.11400

    Ploonets: formation, evolution, and detectability of tidally detached exomoons

    Mario Sucerquia, Jaime A. Alvarado-Montes, Jorge I. Zuluaga, Nicolás Cuello, Cristian Giuppone (Submitted on 27 Jun 2019)

    Close-in giant planets represent the most significant evidence of planetary migration. If large exomoons form around migrating giant planets which are more stable (e.g. those in the Solar System), what happens to these moons after migration is still under intense research. This paper explores the scenario where large regular exomoons escape after tidal-interchange of angular momentum with its parent planet, becoming small planets by themselves. We name this hypothetical type of object a ploonet. By performing semi-analytical simulations of tidal interactions between a large moon with a close-in giant, and integrating numerically their orbits for several Myr, we found that in ∼50 per cent of the cases a young ploonet may survive ejection from the planetary system, or collision with its parent planet and host star, being in principle detectable. Volatile-rich ploonets are dramatically affected by stellar radiation during both planetocentric and siderocentric orbital evolution, and their radius and mass change significantly due to the sublimation of most of their material during time-scales of hundred of Myr. We estimate the photometric signatures that ploonets may produce if they transit the star during the phase of evaporation, and compare them with noisy lightcurves of known objects (\textit{Kronian} stars and non-periodical dips in dusty lightcurves). Additionally, the typical transit timing variations (TTV) induced by the interaction of a ploonet with its planet are computed. We find that present and future photometric surveys' capabilities can detect these effects and distinguish them from those produced by other nearby planetary encounters.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  9. #1629
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    A college course on Atmospheres in one downloadable package. Warning, it is large.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1806.04481

    The Atmosphere

    Dorian S. Abbot (Submitted on 8 Jun 2018 (v1), last revised 25 Jun 2019 (this version, v2))

    These notes contain everything necessary to run a flipped course on "The Atmosphere" at an introductory undergraduate level. There are notes for the students to read before each course meeting and problems for them to work on in small groups during course meetings. Topics include (1) atmospheric composition, structure, and thermodynamics; (2) solar and terrestrial radiation in the atmospheric energy balance; (3) atmospheric dynamics and circulation. I include 10 problem sets, six practice midterms, and three practice finals. Problems are drawn from the atmospheres of modern and past Earth, solar system planets, and extrasolar planets. I can provide solutions to the in-class problems and problem sets to teachers upon request. You are free to use these notes in your classes, and to expand them as you please. If you catch any typos or errors, please send them to me. Enjoy!
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  10. #1630
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    Over half a dozen large papers released this on arXiv on the M87 Event Horizon Telescope project. Too many links to post.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  11. #1631
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    The word for today is: ploonet. It's a moon that becomes a planet. But wouldn't that be a dwarf ploonet?
    Them ploonets is back agin. Turns out they can become planets if ejected early enough.

    https://phys.org/news/2019-07-ploone...mysteries.html
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  12. #1632
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    Will we find exoplanets with bizarre unthinkable mineralogy? No. "[W]holly exotic mineralogies should be rare to absent."

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1907.05506

    The Composition and Mineralogy of Rocky Exoplanets: A Survey of >4,000 Stars from the Hypatia Catalog
    Keith D. Putirka, John C. Rarick (Submitted on 11 Jul 2019)
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  13. #1633
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    "...to reconstruct the evolutionary narrative of the Milky Way." Galactic archaeology could be your life's mission.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1907.05422

    In Pursuit of Galactic Archaeology: Astro2020 Science White Paper
    Melissa Ness et al. (Submitted on 11 Jul 2019)

    The next decade affords tremendous opportunity to achieve the goals of Galactic archaeology. That is, to reconstruct the evolutionary narrative of the Milky Way, based on the empirical data that describes its current morphological, dynamical, temporal and chemical structures. Here, we describe a path to achieving this goal. The critical observational objective is a Galaxy-scale, contiguous, comprehensive mapping of the disk's phase space, tracing where the majority of the stellar mass resides. An ensemble of recent, ongoing, and imminent surveys are working to deliver such a transformative stellar map. Once this empirical description of the dust-obscured disk is assembled, we will no longer be operationally limited by the observational data. The primary and significant challenge within stellar astronomy and Galactic archaeology will then be in fully utilizing these data. We outline the next-decade framework for obtaining and then realizing the potential of the data to chart the Galactic disk via its stars. One way to support the investment in the massive data assemblage will be to establish a Galactic Archaeology Consortium across the ensemble of stellar missions. This would reflect a long-term commitment to build and support a network of personnel in a dedicated effort to aggregate, engineer, and transform stellar measurements into a comprehensive perspective of our Galaxy.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

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