Page 3 of 19 FirstFirst 1234513 ... LastLast
Results 61 to 90 of 568

Thread: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    718
    24 hour hold due to sensor troubles...

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    14
    So I'm in Texas. Central Time here in US. At what hour my time would it be launching. Well, if it hadn't been posponed.

    Thanks.

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    718
    Before the end of the NASA TV broadcast, they gave a tentative lift-off time of 9:45 AM Eastern. That would be 8:45 AM Central.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    14
    Thank you!

    So it will be at 8:45 tomorrow? Or was it supposed to be 8:45 today. If the later is true, at what time then would it be launched tomorrow, if anyone knows.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    15,801
    Quote Originally Posted by justinv3
    So it will be at 8:45 tomorrow? Or was it supposed to be 8:45 today. If the later is true, at what time then would it be launched tomorrow, if anyone knows.
    Keep up-to-date at MRO Mission Page

    Launch Date:
    August 12

    Launch Window:
    7:43 a.m. to 9:43 a.m.
    0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 ...
    Skepticism enables us to distinguish fancy from fact, to test our speculations. --Carl Sagan

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,087
    I heard on the radio coming to work this morning -- they were having problems with some fuel sensors. The first thing I thought of: is it the sensor itself, or my telemetry circuit gone bad.

    So far, no word from LockMart, so I suppose our equipment is working OK, and it really is the actual sensor(s).

    I hope they figure it out.

    When does the overall 2005 Mars "window" close? Sometime in September?

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    11,227
    From NASA HQ:

    NASA'S MARS ORBITER LAUNCH DELAYED 24 HOURS

    The launch of NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has been postponed. The new launch window is 7:43 to 9:43 a.m. EDT, Friday, August 12.

    The delay was called after engineers saw an anomalous reading in the hydrogen propellant loading system on the Atlas V. There was insufficient time in the launch window to fully investigate the reading. The Atlas V vehicle is being de-tanked. The rocket will remain on the launch pad, and the MRO spacecraft is secured.

    Tomorrow's weather forecast calls for a chance for isolated coastal showers. There is a 20 percent probability of not meeting the launch weather criteria.

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    180
    Does the MRO need to be in an equitorial parking orbit before the Trans Martian Injection burn? If so, does it get to a zero inclination orbit as part of the orbital insertion?

    I can't seem to visualize an Earth-Mars transfer with the high Earth orbital inclination associated with launching from KSC. The only thing I can think of is the first Centaur burn is done over the equator and equitorializes the parking orbit.

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,257
    MRO launch coverage from NASA TV has started. The NASA and Lockheed polls for the 4 minute hold are both GO. Count is restarting.

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,257
    So far, so good - Atlas has seperated and Centaur is burning. Payload seperation next up.

  11. #71
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    16,643

    Re: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter

    From Spaceflight Now

    1258 GMT (8:58 a.m. EDT)

    T+plus 75 minutes. NASA's two-and-a-half ton Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, an instrument-laden spacecraft designed to capture an unprecedented level of detail about the Red Planet and help guide future missions, has successfully departed Earth.

    Liftoff of the Lockheed Martin Atlas 5 rocket occurred on time this morning 7:43 a.m. EDT (1143 GMT) from Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida.

    MRO should arrive at Mars next March and start five months of aerobraking maneuvers to reach its science-collecting near-polar orbit stretching from 199 miles above the planet's surface at its furthest point to just 158 miles at the closest.

  12. #72
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    2,181
    =D> =D> =D>

  13. #73
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    1,853
    Cool.
    By the way CRRES was truly a joint mission. Our contract was with NASA to build the spacecraft, but the AF provided much of the funding and the AF payloads. NASA provided the launch vehicle and the NASA payloads. Mission operations were from an AF facility.

  14. #74
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    11,383
    I'm just glad to see Altas Centaur back in action. One way or the other--its been too long since we had an actual probe atop one. Treat the launcher community well--and it treats you well.

  15. #75
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    15,801
    Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Mission Status August 18

    "We have transitioned from launch mode to cruise mode, and the spacecraft continues to perform extremely well," said Dan Johnston, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter deputy mission manager at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    The first and largest of four trajectory correction maneuvers scheduled before the orbiter reaches Mars is planned for Aug. 27.

    For the calibration task on Aug. 15, the spacecraft slewed about 15 degrees to scan the camera across the positions of the Earth and Moon, then returned to the attitude it will hold for most of the cruise. Data were properly recorded onboard, downlinked to Earth and received by the Mars Color Imager team at Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego. Dr. Michael Malin of Malin Space Science Systems, principal investigator for Mars Color Imager, said the image data are being processed and analyzed.
    0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 ...
    Skepticism enables us to distinguish fancy from fact, to test our speculations. --Carl Sagan

  16. #76
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    11,383
    Very good.

  17. #77
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    15,801
    Calibration Image of Earth by (MRO) Mars Color Imager

    (I wonder why it's on a JPL MER page.)



    It ain't much to look at.

    The purpose of acquiring an image of Earth and the Moon just three days after launch was to help the Mars Color Imager science team obtain a measure, in space, of the instrument's sensitivity, as well as to check that no contamination occurred on the camera during launch. Prior to launch, the team determined that, three days out from Earth, the planet would only be about 4.77 pixels across, and the Moon would be less than one pixel in size, as seen from the Mars Color Imager's wide-angle perspective. If the team waited any longer than three days to test the camera's performance in space, Earth would be too small to obtain meaningful results.

    The images were acquired by turning Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter toward Earth, then slewing the spacecraft so that the Earth and Moon would pass before each of the five color and two ultraviolet filters of the Mars Color Imager. The distance to Earth was about 1,170,000 kilometers (about 727,000 miles).
    0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 ...
    Skepticism enables us to distinguish fancy from fact, to test our speculations. --Carl Sagan

  18. #78
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    11,383
    Found on the web.


    http://www.planet4589.org/

    The latest (issue no. 552) contains this excellent info on MRO

    NASA's latest Mars mission was launched on Aug 12. MRO is twice the mass of other recent Mars missions, 2180 kg at launch - back to the scale of the ambitious but unsuccessful Mars Observer whose failure helped triggered creation of the `faster, better, cheaper' missions of the 1990s. The big spacecraft carries a big camera, the 0.5 meter aperture HiRISE telescope, which will return high resolution images of the surface, and a big 3-meter communications dish to allow a high data rate
    for sending the pictures back. MRO has 1196 kg of hydrazine propellant, with six 170-Newton MR-107E Aerojet thrusters and six smaller 22-Newton MR-160E thrusters. The mutiple engines provide propulsion for course correction and Mars orbit insertion. MRO will reach Mars in March 2006.

    The NASA Mars Program
    ---------------------

    Spacecraft Launch Mass NASA Program

    Mariner 3 1964 Nov 5 261 kg Mariner flyby (failed)
    Mariner 4 1964 Nov 28 261 kg Mariner flyby
    Mariner 6 1969 Feb 25 385 kg Mariner flyby
    Mariner 7 1969 Mar 27 383 kg Mariner flyby
    Mariner 8 1971 May 9 1031 kg Mariner orbiter (failed)
    Mariner 9 1971 May 30 1031 kg Mariner orbiter
    Viking 1 1975 Aug 20 3534 kg Viking orbiter/lander
    Viking 2 1975 Sep 9 3526 kg Viking orbiter/lander
    Mars Observer 1992 Sep 25 2565 kg Planetary Observer, failed
    Mars Global Surveyor 1996 Nov 7 1062 kg Mars Surveyor Program
    Mars Pathfinder 1996 Dec 4 880 kg Discovery Program
    Mars Climate Orbiter 1998 Dec 11 629 kg Mars Surveyor Program, failed
    Mars Polar Lander 1999 Jan 3 615 kg Mars Surveyor Program, failed
    2001 Mars Odyssey 2001 Apr 7 730 kg Mars Surveyor Program
    Mars Exploration Rover A 2003 Jun 10 1062 kg Mars Program
    Mars Exploration Rover B 2003 Jul 8 1062 kg Mars Program
    Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter 2005 Aug 12 2180 kg Mars Program

    Launch of MRO was with a Lockheed Martin Atlas V, model 401, serial AV-007. The Atlas CCB stage fired for 4 minutes, followed by the first Centaur stage burn, putting MRO in a 148 x 185 km x 28.5 deg Earth parking orbit 14 min after launch. Centaur fired again at 1132 UTC to reach escape velocity, and separated from MRO at 1141 UTC, with both vehicles on hyperbolic Earth departure orbit with around 205 km perigee and 40.7 deg inclination. MRO passed lunar orbit on Aug 13 and is now
    in a 1.013 x 1.680 AU x 3.1 (ecliptic) deg heliocentric transfer orbit to Mars. The Centaur is lagging slightly behind in a 1.013 x 1.659 AU orbit, targeted to miss Mars.

  19. #79
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    30,000
    The Nuts and Bolts

    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter launched on August 12, and now is on its seven-month journey to the Red Planet. Once there, MRO will search for evidence for water in the martian atmosphere, surface, and subsurface. MRO also will provide detailed surveys of the planet, identifying any obstacles that could jeopardize the safety of future landers and rovers.

    Jim Graf, Project Manager for the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, gave a talk where he provided an overview of the mission. In part two of this edited transcript, Graf describes the instruments that will provide a great amount of detail about martian climate and topography.
    Everything I need to know I learned through Googling.

  20. #80
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    11,383
    I wonder where that Centaur will end up. It might have been cool to see it burn apart over Mars.

  21. #81
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,448
    very nice pic
    http://www.space.com/imageoftheday/i...ay_050914.html
    Mission scientists used MRO’s High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera to build this photograph during a set of observations conducted on Sept. 8, 2005. MRO was about six million miles (about 10 million kilometers) from the moon at the time. I

  22. #82
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    11,383
    Quote Originally Posted by N C More
    Seeing "stuff", looking for evidence of water, saying that something is of geological interest doesn't equate with supporting the case for artificiality in the Cydonia region.

    In fact, if one takes a look here you'll see a number of planetary geologists brainstroming, developing various abstracts for research. This is interesting not only by what is included for study but also what is absent. I note that not one of these experts is actively suggesting the need for archeologists to study artificial structures on Mars.
    Sometimes the worst thing you can do to someone is to give them what they want (I'll never know that feeling until I win a lottery--I'll manage).

    Budgets are tight, so let Griffin meet with Hoagland, and say that if they can raise the 200 million for another rinky-dink, Delta II-thumped bomb-dispoal 'bot, they will put it on Cydonia--provided the Art Bell types raise all the funds and pay for its upkeep--and that of all other probes for one year after that bot fails. They will have joint control.

    Who knows, they might actually find some interesting bedrock--but they won't find structures. If Hoagland makes a claim--Griff drives the little golf cart contraption over to it and says "See? just another rock." This will go on a few cycles and Hoagland will have to find something else to do--and NASA gets a free ride off the woo-woos.

    There is all kind of advertising money on Art Bell, and someone is always selling a book, so if they can get each listener to send a dollar a year for three years--they may have something.

  23. #83
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    16,643

    Re: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter

    Quote Originally Posted by publiusr
    [edit]Budgets are tight, so let Griffin meet with Hoagland, and say that if they can raise the 200 million for another rinky-dink, Delta II-thumped bomb-dispoal 'bot, they will put it on Cydonia--provided the Art Bell types raise all the funds and pay for its upkeep--and that of all other probes for one year after that bot fails. They will have joint control...
    Despite the fact that I agree with you that we need heavy lift capability, your constant repetition of "bigger is always better" and "anything smaller is no good" gets quite tiresome after a while.

    Why don't you use your blinkered approach as a guide to living, and move to Jupiter?

  24. #84
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    495
    Quote Originally Posted by publiusr
    ...another rinky-dink, Delta II-thumped bomb-dispoal 'bot ... the little golf cart contraption ...
    I'm part way through Steve Squyres' Roving Mars at the minute. I wonder what he'd think of you describing his two sophisticated, complex, beautiful machines in this mocking way. Never mind, I'm sure he's not a violent man.

  25. #85
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    2,163
    NASA's MRO, Mars Express, NASA's Mars-Rovers will all be remembered as great missions, but the problem is they are mostly only self-serving robotic missions, much like the Russian Luna robotics and Soviet lunokhod Rover.
    NASA or JPL's Rovers are fantastic, the Spirit and Opportunity have given us great results however some are still sceptical about the Mars-plans because we have heard much of these manned plans before and were supposed to lauch soon after Apollo and also after the Vikings.

    If the USA is serious about putting people on Mars, study of human conditions on Mars and sending manned missions to build a Mars base then we need new missions like the Mars-science Lab, new launchers, have a fully functional and self sufficient ship, building relay craft like the MTO, and missions more geared to manned flight rather than Robotics.
    Last edited by Launch window; 2005-Sep-24 at 06:19 PM.

  26. #86
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    21,846
    Quote Originally Posted by Launch window
    If the USA is serious about putting people on Mars, study of human conditions on Mars and sending manned missions to build a Mars base then we need new missions like the Mars-science Lab, new launchers, have a fully functional and self sufficient ship, builing relay craft like the MTO, and missions more geared to manned flight rather than Robotics.
    I'm not sure that's right. If we are going to send an armada of robotic exploreres to Mars, we'll still need a good data-relay carft at Mars to simplify the business of getting data and instructions to and from Mars.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  27. #87
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    11,383
    I can't help if it sounds old--but the fact is that we have allowed payloads to come first before rocketry. There are new readers here everyday--so the message for better boosters has to be repetitive--as much as hoax-busting the 'we-never-went-to-the-moon' crowd. It bears repeating. Otherwise nothing changes.

  28. #88
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    15,801

    A new record

    Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Is Already Breaking Records

    An unprecedented amount of data - the equivalent of 13 CDs - was returned by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter mission in a single day! NASA's latest mission to Mars sent 75 gigabits of data back to Earth from millions of miles away, including beautiful pictures of the Moon.
    0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 ...
    Skepticism enables us to distinguish fancy from fact, to test our speculations. --Carl Sagan

  29. #89
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,087
    After seeing MGS use the compensated Pitch and ROll Targeted Observation(cPROTO) technique for viewing Opportunity directly at the North end of Erebus (at 0.5 m/pixel resolution) -- very impressive -- I am wondering if MRO can use the same technique with the 20" telescope to increase its nominal resolution to see possibly in the 1-to-10 cm/pixel order-of-magnitude.

    Blueberries from space, anyone? Comments?

  30. #90
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Ocean Shores, Wa
    Posts
    5,646
    Quote Originally Posted by aurora
    Just get a room full of grad students and have them start going through the images one at a time... :P
    We put together some software that is designed to detect this type of artifact using principle component analysis. It is difficult to tune it to where it can discriminate between a 'noise cluster' and a true event, but it would provide a great first screening of anything with a unique signature in a half dozen connected pixels.

    What would really be fun to do, would be to disseminate the 'hits' at the grade school, not graduate school level. Lots and lots of keen eyes...
    “It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts.” ― Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes

Similar Threads

  1. New Pictures from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter
    By Fraser in forum Universe Today
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 2006-Oct-19, 05:10 PM
  2. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is Doing Well
    By Fraser in forum Universe Today
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 2005-Sep-15, 07:31 PM
  3. Up Next, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter
    By Fraser in forum Universe Today
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 2005-Sep-08, 02:43 AM
  4. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Launched
    By Fraser in forum Universe Today
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 2005-Sep-07, 11:47 AM
  5. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter
    By bossman20081 in forum Space Exploration
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 2005-Aug-17, 03:34 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •