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Thread: Really trivial stuff that bugs you

  1. #9121
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    Manual staple removers don't work with staples that are automatically inserted by the copy machine.


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  2. #9122
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    Manual staple removers don't work with staples that are automatically inserted by the copy machine.
    No, no, y'see ... that picture of a staple on the copy is non-functional any way!




    (Just kidding. That must be an advanced copy machine, compared to ours.)

  3. #9123
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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmocrazy View Post
    When you are in your car, waiting a while at a busy T junction wanting to pull out across a lane. A vehicle comes wanting to turn in in front of you and the easiest, most obvious solution is for that vehicle to let you out first, but they don't. Only to cause total grid lock because they are unable make the turn and get past you.
    Why am I having a hard time visualizing this?
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  4. #9124
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    Probably trivial to some but no-so-trivial to others, but whenever there's a typo in something I'm reading, I always catch it. I might be eye-deep in a good book at two in the morning (one more chapter then I'll go to bed! Okay, one more chapter...) but as soon as there's some glaring typo, I immediately notice it and it catches me out for a second, but then I carry on reading anyway. Sometimes it might be a sentence that is confusing only because it is missing a word that, were it present, would make it make sense. I seem to spot them more in books that are boring me to tears rather than a fun read though!

  5. #9125
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    Do you mean "not-so-trivial"?


  6. #9126
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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmocrazy
    When you are in your car, waiting a while at a busy T junction wanting to pull out across a lane. A vehicle comes wanting to turn in in front of you and the easiest, most obvious solution is for that vehicle to let you out first, but they don't. Only to cause total grid lock because they are unable make the turn and get past you.
    Quote Originally Posted by SeanF View Post
    Why am I having a hard time visualizing this?
    We do not have enough information about the positions and intents of the two drivers. Here is a possible situation. Driver A in a car is on a narrow side street waiting to make a left turn. Driver B in a big truck is coming from the right and attempting to make a left turn into the side street. His rig is so long that he cannot make the turn without sideswiping the car, but tries it anyway. A cannot back up because there are more cars behind him. Although B on a main road may technically have the right of way, he should have waited for A to get out of the way. I don't know what the law says about such a situation.

  7. #9127
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hornblower View Post
    We do not have enough information about the positions and intents of the two drivers. Here is a possible situation. Driver A in a car is on a narrow side street waiting to make a left turn. Driver B in a big truck is coming from the right and attempting to make a left turn into the side street. His rig is so long that he cannot make the turn without sideswiping the car, but tries it anyway. A cannot back up because there are more cars behind him. Although B on a main road may technically have the right of way, he should have waited for A to get out of the way. I don't know what the law says about such a situation.
    I was stuck in a similar situation about a year ago, and described it here, but did so confusingly.

    Except that in my situation, I was on a smaller road pointing East, and ready to turn left (i.e., Northward). This big, long truck, on the bigger street and ahead to my left, was pointed South, and turning right (i.e., Westward). He was targeting the Westbound lane parallel to mine, but I had serious doubts that he could make it.

    He went ahead with his turn, bearing right down on me. Fortunately, I had nobody behind me, and was able to drive backward quite some distance so that he had just enough space to make the turn. All I could think of as to shout "DON'T DO THAT AGAIN!" for what it was worth.
    Last edited by DonM435; 2017-Apr-20 at 04:15 PM. Reason: land --> lane

  8. #9128
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonM435 View Post
    No, no, y'see ... that picture of a staple on the copy is non-functional any way!
    (Just kidding. That must be an advanced copy machine, compared to ours.)
    That's pretty funny. I can just see myself trying to remove an image of a staple.

    Actually, the staples our copier uses are really long, but the holes punched in the paper are slightly closer together than regular staples.
    So you end up with two very long bent legs that are too close together for the staple remover to grab.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  9. #9129
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    Today one of my advisors invited me to get sorbet and we had a nice talk about the neighborhood, our families, and other fun and non-stressful, non-academic topics. But when I mentioned reading graphic novels at the public library, she asked me why adults would read comics, accused me of being euphemistic when calling comics an art form that could be applied to as many genres as film or literature, and was surprised to hear that educational comics exist and that many schools have graphic novels in their libraries. I tried as politely as I could to explain the errors in her assumptions, but it was a really strange conversation to have in the present day and age in a city that has been so central to the comics industry.

  10. #9130
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    For some reason I ended up taking like a 2 1/2 -3 hour nap now I will be up all night.
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  11. #9131
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    Today one of my advisors invited me to get sorbet and we had a nice talk about the neighborhood, our families, and other fun and non-stressful, non-academic topics. But when I mentioned reading graphic novels at the public library, she asked me why adults would read comics, accused me of being euphemistic when calling comics an art form that could be applied to as many genres as film or literature, and was surprised to hear that educational comics exist and that many schools have graphic novels in their libraries. I tried as politely as I could to explain the errors in her assumptions, but it was a really strange conversation to have in the present day and age in a city that has been so central to the comics industry.
    I was surprised when my oldest niece asked for Maus for Christmas when she was in seventh grade, it basically is a retelling of the holocaust. She first read at from the local school library.
    Last edited by astrotimer; 2017-Apr-20 at 04:02 AM.
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    You cannot run away from the truth, the world is not big enough. DI Jack Frost
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  12. #9132
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hornblower View Post
    We do not have enough information about the positions and intents of the two drivers. Here is a possible situation. Driver A in a car is on a narrow side street waiting to make a left turn. Driver B in a big truck is coming from the right and attempting to make a left turn into the side street. His rig is so long that he cannot make the turn without sideswiping the car, but tries it anyway. A cannot back up because there are more cars behind him. Although B on a main road may technically have the right of way, he should have waited for A to get out of the way. I don't know what the law says about such a situation.
    Yes exactly this situation! Except, here in the UK its (my bold) right turns coming form the left.

    Thank you for your clear explanation!

  13. #9133
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    Today one of my advisors invited me to get sorbet and we had a nice talk about the neighborhood, our families, and other fun and non-stressful, non-academic topics. But when I mentioned reading graphic novels at the public library, she asked me why adults would read comics, accused me of being euphemistic when calling comics an art form that could be applied to as many genres as film or literature, and was surprised to hear that educational comics exist and that many schools have graphic novels in their libraries. I tr haied as politely as I could to explain the errors in her assumptions, but it was a really strange conversation to have in the present day and age in a city that has been so central to the comics industry.
    I suspect it's probably a pretty common conversation in this day and age, because we have a generational mix of people who have had very different experiences of comic books. Once the generation that experienced comic books as purely children's entertainment has died out, the conversation will change.

    I've tried very hard to appreciate graphic novels, but I seem to lack the mental tools - I yearn for descriptive text.

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  14. #9134
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I suspect it's probably a pretty common conversation in this day and age, because we have a generational mix of people who have had very different experiences of comic books. Once the generation that experienced comic books as purely children's entertainment has died out, the conversation will change.
    Hmmm, I think that refers to me, but it doesn't apply.

    I read a lot of comics when I was a kid ... all types. It made reading fun and encouraged me to read more and to read other things. I see nothing wrong with them as a genre for that reason.

    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I've tried very hard to appreciate graphic novels, but I seem to lack the mental tools - I yearn for descriptive text.

    Grant Hutchison
    I like graphic novels for a "quick read." Rather than spend time reading a description of a scene I can see it immediately. And in some cases the art work is, well, artistic and can be enjoyed as such.

    (Which means I sometimes spend the same amount of time admiring the art work as I thought I was saving by not reading a description of it. Sometimes more.)
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  15. #9135
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    Hmmm, I think that refers to me, but it doesn't apply.

    I read a lot of comics when I was a kid ... all types. It made reading fun and encouraged me to read more and to read other things. I see nothing wrong with them as a genre for that reason.
    Sure. Generations have identifiable behavioural characteristics only in the aggregate. Individuals are individual.

    It was easy for people in my generation (and those a little younger) to walk away from comics and never think about them again, and end up with the very limited view that Kai Yeves's adviser has. But that became progressively less like for younger people as graphic novels took off and started to win awards.

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  16. #9136
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    Like the abovementioned Maus, which won the Pulitzer Prize. In 1992.
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  17. #9137
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    Like the abovementioned Maus, which won the Pulitzer Prize. In 1992.
    Yes. I bought a copy of Maus because of that. It was the first graphic novel I ever had occasion to look at, and at that time it had been about 25 years since I'd put down my last comic book.
    I didn't get it - the format simply defeated me, and I couldn't finish it because (to me) the style of story-telling simply didn't match the content. There had been too long a gap and there was too strong an association with the stuff I had been impatient to get rid of as a child. People 10 or 15 years younger than me were able to make a smooth transition from children's comics to graphic novels, without ever running into the rite-of-passage transition to text-only that was such a significant part of growing up, in my time and perhaps also in my part of the world. The deliberate abandonment of comic books was a formative and deeply satisfying moment in many children's lives at that time, one to be celebrated.
    The effects of transformational experiences at a young age are always difficult to shake off.

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  18. #9138
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Yes. I bought a copy of Maus because of that. It was the first graphic novel I ever had occasion to look at, and at that time it had been about 25 years since I'd put down my last comic book.
    I didn't get it - the format simply defeated me, and I couldn't finish it because (to me) the style of story-telling simply didn't match the content. There had been too long a gap and there was too strong an association with the stuff I had been impatient to get rid of as a child. People 10 or 15 years younger than me were able to make a smooth transition from children's comics to graphic novels, without ever running into the rite-of-passage transition to text-only that was such a significant part of growing up, in my time and perhaps also in my part of the world. The deliberate abandonment of comic books was a formative and deeply satisfying moment in many children's lives at that time, one to be celebrated.
    The effects of transformational experiences at a young age are always difficult to shake off.

    Grant Hutchison
    I agree that reading comics is a different mindset than reading print text (because of the role of the image, including in replacing descriptive text, as you said) that one has to become accustomed to, like learning to speak a different dialect or language, and going from the mindset of one to another as you pick up books in the library and read the first few pages to assess them does require a form of "code-switching" like switching between languages does. For someone "fluent" in and familiar with both, the process may be almost unconscious, but for someone out-of-practice or still learning, it's harder.

  19. #9139
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    When reading the Sports Illustrated article on the theft of Tom Brady's jerseys, I once again was annoyed by the ostentatious practice of writing "Super Bowl (whatever Roman numeral)". I am not fluent in reading the bloody things, so I could not tell at a glance when the earlier incident was. I wish the sports journalism world would ridicule the NFL about this instead of embracing it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    I agree that reading comics is a different mindset than reading print text (because of the role of the image, including in replacing descriptive text, as you said) that one has to become accustomed to, like learning to speak a different dialect or language, and going from the mindset of one to another as you pick up books in the library and read the first few pages to assess them does require a form of "code-switching" like switching between languages does. For someone "fluent" in and familiar with both, the process may be almost unconscious, but for someone out-of-practice or still learning, it's harder.
    And to that you need to add the sensation, for people who grew up as I did, that the code-switching is to a deprecated code. I've been trying and failing to come up with an analogy that doesn't ludicrously overstate the problem. Having someone else tie your shoelaces is too extreme, but is similar in some ways, There's a nagging sense that you're being patronized - that the visual imagery is there because the publisher thinks you're not smart enough to imagine the story from text alone, or will get tired if you have to read too many words. When I was a kid you got away from that style of story-telling as quickly as you could, and were congratulated when you did.
    When I tried to read Maus, there was a very real cognitive dissonance in seeing a harrowing true-life story being narrated in the language of comic books - so I found it slightly repellent, and I couldn't get past that.

    Grant Hutchison

  21. #9141
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hornblower View Post
    When reading the Sports Illustrated article on the theft of Tom Brady's jerseys, I once again was annoyed by the ostentatious practice of writing "Super Bowl (whatever Roman numeral)". I am not fluent in reading the bloody things, so I could not tell at a glance when the earlier incident was. I wish the sports journalism world would ridicule the NFL about this instead of embracing it.
    Tsk tsk, back to Latin class with you, magistra will be very disappointed... ;-)
    Last edited by KaiYeves; 2017-Apr-20 at 07:18 PM.

  22. #9142
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    Tsk tsk, back to Latin class with you, magistra will be very disappointed... ;-)
    Actually, the NFL briefly suspended the practice, calling the Super Bowl between XLIX and LI just 50. They must have figured that their fans would wonder what the L number it was.

  23. #9143
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    I'm just waiting to see what they call number 59.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  24. #9144
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I'm just waiting to see what they call number 59.
    Roman-style, ILX. Arabic-style, 59.

  25. #9145
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    Roman-style, ILX. Arabic-style, 59.
    That's LIX. For reduction by 1, you don't put I before anything but V or X. You can put X before L or C to reduce by ten, and C before D or M, to reduce by a hundred. Them's the rules.

    We were taught Roman numerals in school, but for those who weren't there's a handy online converter, here

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  26. #9146
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonM435 View Post
    Actually, the NFL briefly suspended the practice, calling the Super Bowl between XLIX and LI just 50. They must have figured that their fans would wonder what the L number it was.
    Or that someone made a typo and couldn't stop spelling "Bowl".
    Super Bowl L


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  27. #9147
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    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    Or that someone made a typo and couldn't stop spelling "Bowl".
    Super Bowl L
    Long ago, somebody in our building posted a notice on the bulletin board.
    "Are you going to the Gator Bowel? I have some tickets to sell."

    Someone added "Hell, no!"

  28. #9148
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    That's LIX. For reduction by 1, you don't put I before anything but V or X. You can put X before L or C to reduce by ten, and C before D or M, to reduce by a hundred. Them's the rules.

    We were taught Roman numerals in school, but for those who weren't there's a handy online converter, here

    Grant Hutchison
    Yes, I knew that. But it's rather unfortunately pronounceable.
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  29. #9149
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Yes, I knew that.
    And I guessed you knew that. Maybe KaiYeves guessed you knew that, too, and the ILX / LIX thing is actually a joke I'm not getting. But I can't see how "ilks" is any better or worse than "licks", unless there's a slang usage that doesn't cross the Atlantic.

    Grant Hutchison

  30. #9150
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    That's LIX. For reduction by 1, you don't put I before anything but V or X. You can put X before L or C to reduce by ten, and C before D or M, to reduce by a hundred. Them's the rules.

    We were taught Roman numerals in school, but for those who weren't there's a handy online converter, here

    Grant Hutchison
    Ah, thank you, I goofed there. I also learned in school, but I don't think we did numbers that high.

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