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Thread: Really trivial stuff that bugs you

  1. #11431
    It happens about once or twice a winter. Don't know exactly what causes it but there is a lot of big pieces of wood being thrown in that could vibrate it and make it move a little at a time. Everything has its pros and cons.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
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  2. #11432
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    People who review restaurants on social media based on whether or not it's 'authentic'. First, most of these folks (I'm not talking about people who are professional restaurant reviewers) haven't a clue what is or is not authentic with the cuisine and second, unless the restaurant strictly bills itself as being authentic, does it really matter if that plate of dandan noodles is exactly as you'd find in Chengdu?

  3. #11433
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    I can only really speak to Mexican food--yes, all right, most of what I actually prefer is Tex-Mex. But if you're putting weird ingredients in things that wouldn't normally be in the country's cuisine, I can tell. In point of fact, I only started eating the Mexican food in this state at all when I discovered exactly how many of the local restaurants had been started by immigrant families from Mexico.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  4. #11434
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    Speaking as a food slut, I believe food should be rated merely on whether it is delicious.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  5. #11435
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    The Boon Companion takes an opposite stance: she is vexed by entire countries who aren't prepared to move their cuisine into alignment with what's served in the equivalent restaurants in the UK.
    Having spent her university years living off Chinese takeaways, she was appalled to discover that she couldn't source chips in sweet-and-sour sauce anywhere we visited in China.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  6. #11436
    Right now I wondering if there are any Chinese sweet 'n sour flavored chips.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  7. #11437
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Backroad Astronomer View Post
    Right now I wondering if there are any Chinese sweet 'n sour flavored chips.
    Did you mean our chips, which Grant would call "crisps"? Or his chips, which we would call "fries"? Separated by a common language, and all that.
    Assuming the former, here you go. Note that the bag says "crisps". Looks like they're made in the UK.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  8. #11438
    Just found out that I am out of memory well used 430 GB with only 5 left, I think it might time for an external hard drive or get rid of the linux partition I hardly use.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  9. #11439
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Did you mean our chips, which Grant would call "crisps"? Or his chips, which we would call "fries"? Separated by a common language, and all that.
    Assuming the former, here you go. Note that the bag says "crisps". Looks like they're made in the UK.
    You could always make your own flavoring salt explained in this video.
    https://youtu.be/Ns5EjFEKiVo
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  10. #11440
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Did you mean our chips, which Grant would call "crisps"? Or his chips, which we would call "fries"? Separated by a common language, and all that.
    Assuming the former, here you go. Note that the bag says "crisps". Looks like they're made in the UK.
    There's another British company, called Burts, that make sweet and sour prawn crisps. Reviews suggest they taste of neither sweet and sour sauce nor prawns.

    But, yes, an expanded polystyrene container full of french fries, covered in sweet and sour sauce, eaten with a plastic fork as you walked home from the pub in the wee hours. I was more of a chips-in-curry-sauce kind of guy. I still can't smell that peculiar aroma of cheap generic takeaway curry sauce without having flashbacks to student life that are simultaneously pleasant and appalling.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  11. #11441
    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    Nice that it stayed together and your problem remained in the “trivial thread” category.

    And remember, Carbon monoxide detectors are your friend.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Two houses in the are have burned down in the last couple of days.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  12. #11442
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    The Boon Companion takes an opposite stance: she is vexed by entire countries who aren't prepared to move their cuisine into alignment with what's served in the equivalent restaurants in the UK.
    Having spent her university years living off Chinese takeaways, she was appalled to discover that she couldn't source chips in sweet-and-sour sauce anywhere we visited in China.

    Grant Hutchison
    That's pretty funny. But I must point out that her stance is not opposite that which I posted, if that's what you were referring to. My vexation involves people reviewing restaurants (chiefly on Yelp), not whether restaurants are or are not legitimately authentic.

  13. #11443
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Backroad Astronomer View Post
    Two houses in the are have burned down in the last couple of days.
    In that case, smoke detectors are your friends*, too.

    *Although I'm not too sure about that one that triggers every time I use the toaster.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  14. #11444
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    That's pretty funny. But I must point out that her stance is not opposite that which I posted, if that's what you were referring to. My vexation involves people reviewing restaurants (chiefly on Yelp), not whether restaurants are or are not legitimately authentic.
    Opposite of the stance affected by the reviewers you're complaining about.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  15. #11445
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    There's another British company, called Burts, that make sweet and sour prawn crisps. Reviews suggest they taste of neither sweet and sour sauce nor prawns.

    But, yes, an expanded polystyrene container full of french fries, covered in sweet and sour sauce, eaten with a plastic fork as you walked home from the pub in the wee hours. I was more of a chips-in-curry-sauce kind of guy. I still can't smell that peculiar aroma of cheap generic takeaway curry sauce without having flashbacks to student life that are simultaneously pleasant and appalling.

    Grant Hutchison
    My wife was horrified when went to the UK in the 1970's and she saw her cousins eating chips (fries)-in-curry-sauce. She is not normally a food purist but simply couldn't bear to see curry treated that way. Especially as their father had bee born in Penang so should have been able to teach them about curry. After all in much of the UK it is not hard to get a good curry.

  16. #11446
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    I happen to drive in a high traffic area on my way home. Sometimes, you get stuck behind a bicycle and going around them without being super aggressive is impossible.

    Today, this happened to me. I started to get annoyed, up until the point where I realized idling along behind a bike was no slower than dealing with the bumper-to-bumper traffic. It was messy out and I decided that whenever I got home, I'd take a nap unlike the cyclist who would spend a couple of hours drying off and warming up. I spent several blocks examining the cyclist in front of me. He had a nice bike, a cool jacket, helmet, reflective vest and a pair of flashers, one on the bike and one on his back. He must do this every day.

    Que the aggressive moron. A second cyclist riding like hell for leather overtook me on the left, using the small space between my car and the next car to pass me. He then cut into my lane and nearly struck the first cyclist. To avoid hitting him, Mr. Aggressive hit the curb head on and did a face plant. Since the first cyclist didn't even see him and continued on his way, he screamed at me. I shouldn't have but I chuckled.

    He didn't have brakes*. Or a helmet. Or any sort of sense of danger. Nice job being a hazard to absolutely everyone on the road.

    I have a theory that I pass 1,000 cyclists and never see them because they aren't doing obnoxious stuff and get annoyed at all cyclists because of that one lunatic I do notice.

    *I used assemble bicycles, so I immediately noticed that the bike had discs, but no other braking hardware. The places these items would have been had saw marks. I cannot even imagine the "complex math" that had to happen before the hacksaw came out. "Saving weight by lopping this off!"

    Oh my god! You've ruined not only a set of brakes, you made a hash of the handlebars and the frame! Why!?!
    Solfe

  17. #11447
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    My wife was horrified when went to the UK in the 1970's and she saw her cousins eating chips (fries)-in-curry-sauce. She is not normally a food purist but simply couldn't bear to see curry treated that way. Especially as their father had bee born in Penang so should have been able to teach them about curry. After all in much of the UK it is not hard to get a good curry.
    Two different categories of human endeavour, really.
    There were a couple of good Indian restaurants in town (I worked in one of them for a while), and my social group enjoyed occasional celebratory meals in these. (Several of the traditional dishes served in British curry houses are actually British Indian inventions, and you won't find them in India - something that further complicates anyone's efforts to state whether a particular dish is "authentic" or not.)
    But the generic curry sauce used on chips back in the 70s (and, from the smell and appearance of discarded containers, still used today) was not really something you could "spoil" - it had an oily texture, a strange faecal colour and a one-dimensional "hot" taste. It was strictly for annointing a cheap junk meal. I'm pretty sure it was prepared from huge tins of generic "curry powder", of the sort my mother used to buy in smaller quantities. (She used to make "curry" for my father, who was brought up in India and then served there during the war. This consisted of steak mince seeded with raisins and prepared with curry powder, served on a base of boil-in-the-bag rice. It was a monstrosity, which he dutifully ate without complaint.)

    Grant Hutchison
    Last edited by grant hutchison; Today at 11:49 AM.
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  18. #11448
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Two different categories of human endeavour, really.
    There were a couple of good Indian restaurants in town (I worked in one of them for a while), and my social group enjoyed occasional celebratory meals in these. (Several of the traditional dishes served in British curry houses are actually British Indian inventions, and you won't find them in India - something that further complicates anyone's efforts to state whether a particular dish is "authentic" or not.)
    But the generic curry sauce used on chips back in the 70s (and, from the smell and appearance of discarded containers, still used today) was not really something you could "spoil" - it had an oily texture, a strange faecal colour and a one-dimensional "hot" taste. It was strictly for annointing a cheap junk meal. I'm pretty sure it was prepared from huge tins of generic "curry powder", of the sort my mother used to buy in smaller quantities. (She used to make "curry" for my father, who was brought up in India and then served there during the war. This consisted of steak mince seeded with raisins and prepared with curry powder, served on a base of boil-in-the-bag rice. It was a monstrosity, which he dutifully ate without complaint.)

    Grant Hutchison
    Yes, it was pretty obvious that the "sauce" used for the chips-in-curry sauce had very little relationship with any slightly authentic form of curry. I think she was more astonished that they would eat that and yet not eat a true curry - not necessarily hot but cooked with the proper spices. The obvious UK "invention" that comes to mind is Chicken tikka massala. The curries available in Malaysia and Singapore often differ from Indian ones as well. Your mothers curry sounds pretty much like what my mother used to cook - Keens Curry Powder has a lot to answer for! It was a revelation when I had my first "real" curry in my late teens.

  19. #11449
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    This reminds me of a quick cheap sauce made in the pan with honey and generic curry powder, very succesful with many equally fast substrates.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  20. #11450
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    I think she was more astonished that they would eat that and yet not eat a true curry - not necessarily hot but cooked with the proper spices.
    The experience is so different, I can imagine people liking one but not the other. To be honest, chips in curry sauce is stored in a different section of my brain from Indian food - not least because I only ever ate it from a Chinese restaurant, which also served something purporting to be a kebab. (The takeaway part of the restaurant was called the Kerry Oot. The area with table service was called the City Inn. The hellish puns involved in those two names may not be immediately evident to non-Scots, but with a little thought the full horror may strike you.)

    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    Your mothers curry sounds pretty much like what my mother used to cook - Keens Curry Powder has a lot to answer for! It was a revelation when I had my first "real" curry in my late teens.
    Shortly after my parents were married, my father announced that he'd enjoy a curry for dinner one evening. (Food preparation was of course women's work.) My mother served up the first one with mashed potatoes, and my father told her that curry was usually served on a bed of rice. "Are you sure?" she said. He was very sure.
    So the next time he came home to a curry, it was nestling in the middle of a creamed rice pudding.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  21. #11451
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    ... (Several of the traditional dishes served in British curry houses are actually British Indian inventions, and you won't find them in India - something that further complicates anyone's efforts to state whether a particular dish is "authentic" or not.)...
    Yes, this speaks to one of my points. Many people who proclaim a restaurant to be authentic really have no idea. In larger American cities that have a thriving Asian culinary scene - such as Atlanta where I lived for twenty years (Buford Highway!) - some of the Chinese restaurants will have two menus: one featuring 'Americanized' dishes and a second where you'll find the more authentic Chinese dishes. If you're not Asian in appearance, you'll be given the first menu and will have to ask for the second, if you know it exists.

    In one such establishment, a group of us non-Asians - all members of a local foodie group who knew about the authentic menu - were forced to demonstrate our chopstick skills before the proprietor would hand out that menu. A bowl of shelled peanuts was placed on the table and we each had to transfer a nut from bowl to plate with chopsticks. At another, more popular restaurant (Tasty China, for those who live in Atlanta), the restaurant featured a famous chef who prepared authentic Sichuan dishes - many of which were quite spicy. The manager (herself somewhat notorious) would sometimes veto a person's order: "Oh no! That one is too hot for you!"

  22. #11452
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    The experience is so different, I can imagine people liking one but not the other. To be honest, chips in curry sauce is stored in a different section of my brain from Indian food - not least because I only ever ate it from a Chinese restaurant, which also served something purporting to be a kebab. (The takeaway part of the restaurant was called the Kerry Oot. The area with table service was called the City Inn. The hellish puns involved in those two names may not be immediately evident to non-Scots, but with a little thought the full horror may strike you.)

    Shortly after my parents were married, my father announced that he'd enjoy a curry for dinner one evening. (Food preparation was of course women's work.) My mother served up the first one with mashed potatoes, and my father told her that curry was usually served on a bed of rice. "Are you sure?" she said. He was very sure.
    So the next time he came home to a curry, it was nestling in the middle of a creamed rice pudding.

    Grant Hutchison
    Ok your curry stories beat any that I could possibly relate. (But, I did get the horrible puns pretty much straight away - obviously just a warped mind.)

  23. #11453
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    In one such establishment, a group of us non-Asians - all members of a local foodie group who knew about the authentic menu - were forced to demonstrate our chopstick skills before the proprietor would hand out that menu. A bowl of shelled peanuts was placed on the table and we each had to transfer a nut from bowl to plate with chopsticks.
    I think I've told the story here before, but I remember eating at a restaurant in Xian, and reaching across with my chopsticks to pick a cashew nut off a plate on the far side of the table. I got this thing about halfway to my mouth when I realized a group of Chinese ladies at the next table were watching me with keen interest. After I put it in my mouth, they all gave a grave little nod and returned to their conversation. I felt like I'd just passed some sort of test I hadn't even known I was sitting.

    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    At another, more popular restaurant (Tasty China, for those who live in Atlanta), the restaurant featured a famous chef who prepared authentic Sichuan dishes - many of which were quite spicy. The manager (herself somewhat notorious) would sometimes veto a person's order: "Oh no! That one is too hot for you!"
    In contrast to the phall curry, a sort of culinary antipersonnel weapon, invented in British Bangladeshi restaurants, only ever eaten by Brits wanting to prove how hard they are, and commonly assumed to be a sort of complicated revenge for the Raj. (There was once a pair of Indian restaurants in a town near here, both owned by the same man, called the Cawnpore and the Amritsar. Both had a sign outside proclaiming "the spirit of Anglo-Indian friendship". Anyone who knew the history of British India couldn't help but wince at the combination of the message and the names of the establishments, and I have always suspected it was a very deliberate dark joke that wafted straight past most of his clientele.)

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  24. #11454
    Quote Originally Posted by The Backroad Astronomer View Post
    Just found out that I am out of memory well used 430 GB with only 5 left, I think it might time for an external hard drive or get rid of the linux partition I hardly use.
    Just deleted 55 GB of podcasts still more I could delete but it has giving me room to move the photos on the phone to the computer.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

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