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Thread: Bird-brain intelligence?

  1. #61
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    http://www.hawkbirdscarer.com/problembirds_crows.php

    Apparently golf ball theft by crows is quite common. Sorry but I couldn't find anything in search engines about it. Was a few years ago. Think it was a call in so theres no way to verify if it was true.

  2. #62
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    I saw a crow approach a discarded bag of potato chips. The crow picked up the bag from the bottom and poured out the remaining chips from bottom of the bag.
    A quick small meal.
    The crow did this so quickly that it obviously had lots of experience with discarded bags of chips.

  3. #63
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    Latest on crow intelligence from Laboratory Equipment

    Crows have long been heralded for their high intelligence — they can remember faces, use tools and communicate in sophisticated ways.

    But a newly published study finds crows also have the brain power to solve higher-order, relational-matching tasks, and they can do so spontaneously. That means crows join humans, apes and monkeys in exhibiting advanced relational thinking, according to the research.
    "Crows Spontaneously Exhibit Analogical Reasoning," which was published today in Current Biology, was written by Wasserman and Anna Smirnova, Zoya Zorina and Tanya Obozova, researchers with the Department of Biology at Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. in Moscow, Russia, where the study was conducted.
    Once the crows has been trained on identity matching-to-sample, the researchers moved to the second phase of the experiment. This time, the birds were assessed with relational matching pairs of items.

    These relational matching trials were arranged in such a way that neither test pairs precisely matched the sample pair, thereby eliminating control by physical identity. For example, the crows might have to choose two same-sized circles rather than two different-sized circles when the sample card displayed two same-sized squares.

    What surprised the researchers was not only that the crows could correctly perform the relational matches, but that they did so spontaneously — without explicit training.

    "That is the crux of the discovery," Wasserman says. "Honestly, if it was only by brute force that the crows showed this learning, then it would have been an impressive result. But this feat was spontaneous."

    Still the researchers acknowledge that the crows' relational matching behavior did not come without some background knowledge.

    "Indeed, we believe that their earlier IMTS (identity matching-to-sample) training is likely to have enabled them to grasp a broadly applicable concept of sameness that could apply to novel two-item samples and test stimuli involving only relational sameness," the researchers wrote. "Just how that remarkable transfer is accomplished represents an intriguing matter for future study."

    Anthony Wright, neurobiology and anatomy professor at the Univ. of Texas-Houston Medical School, says the discovery ranks on par with demonstrations of tool use by some birds, including crows.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  4. #64
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    I think my sister's got it.

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCoyote View Post
    Crows and Ravens do show significant intelligence, however they can also be rather long lived. Without more info on how bird intelligence develops, there could be some correlation to them simply living long enough to study and experiment with the world enough to develop unique solutions. Other birds might not be any worse year against year, they just die too soon.
    Have you forgotten African grey parrots, Macaws and cockatoos? Sometimes these live into their 70s!

  6. #66
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    Exclamation Crows built complex tools without our help

    I want a New Caledonian crow to do my housework. I think we all do. Where can I get one? New Caledonia?


    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...1024112201.htm

    New Caledonian crows can create compound tools

    The birds are able to combine individual parts to form a long-distance reaching aid
    Date:October 24, 2018 Source:Max-Planck-Gesellschaft

    An international team of scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Seewiesen, Germany, and the University of Oxford have revealed that New Caledonian crows are able to create tools by combining two or more otherwise non-functional elements, an ability so far observed only in humans and great apes.

    The new study shows that these birds can create long-reaching tools out of short combinable parts -- an astonishing mental feat. Assemblage of different components into novel functional and manoeuvrable tools has, until now, only been observed in apes, and anthropologists regard early human compound tool manufacture as a significant step in brain evolution. Children take several years before creating novel tools, probably because it requires anticipating properties of yet unseen objects. Such anticipation, or planning, is usually interpreted as involving creative mental modelling and executive functions.

    The study demonstrates that this species of crow possess highly flexible abilities that allow them to solve complex problems involving anticipation of the properties of objects they have never seen. 'The finding is remarkable because the crows received no assistance or training in making these combinations, they figured it out by themselves,' says Auguste von Bayern, first author of the study from the Max-Planck-Institute for Ornithology and University of Oxford.

    ===============

    http://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-33458-z

    Compound tool construction by New Caledonian crows
    (complete article in HTML)
    A. M. P. von Bayern, S. Danel, A. M. I. Auersperg, B. Mioduszewska & A. Kacelnik
    Scientific Reportsvolume 8, Article number: 15676 (2018)
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  7. #67
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    If they can do this, they have probably also figured out economics and so you might not be able to afford their pay rates.

  8. #68
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    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  9. #69
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    I am okay with merging these two threads. Did not know of the earlier one.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    I am okay with merging these two threads. Did not know of the earlier one.
    Done
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  11. #71
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    Paper title says it all. We need to get some of these crows as research assistants.


    https://phys.org/news/2019-01-caledo...er-weight.html

    New Caledonian crows found able to infer weight of an object by watching how it behaves in the wind

    January 9, 2019 by Bob Yirka, Phys.org report
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  12. #72
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    As somewhat of an aside, I just finished reading "Ravenmaster" by Chris Skaife, the Ravenmaster for the Tower of London (NPR story). I loved it. Interesting, personal take on ravens, including their intelligence.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  13. #73
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    If your talking parrot orders ice cream from Amazon.com using Alexa, are you legally responsible for the purchase? Yes, you probably are.


    https://phys.org/news/2019-01-alexa-...e-virtual.html

    'Alexa, call my lawyer!' Are you legally liable if someone makes a purchase using your virtual assistant?
    January 11, 2019 by Mark Giancaspro, The Conversation

    When Amazon launched its Alexa virtual assistant in 2014, it probably didn't think that a bird would expose a potentially significant legal issue with the device. But an African grey parrot named Rocco, living in Blewbury, England, appears to have done just that. Last month, Rocco made headlines for his habit of secretly ordering goods through his owner's voice-activated Alexa device, which charges purchases to the linked Amazon account. The African grey species, which is renowned for its ability to mimic human speech, successfully ordered fruit, vegetables, ice-cream, a kettle, light bulbs and a kite.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  14. #74
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    I'm sure they can pay for it with the recordings of the parrot ordering stuff; should be good for several thousands hits at least.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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