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Thread: Really trivial stuff that amuses you...

  1. #8881
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I'm amused by the fact that facial recognition software no longer recognizes the thing on the front of my head as being a face. A couple of friends recently mentioned that their photo-tagging software didn't recognize me as being a person; now the autofocus on my wife's camera has started ignoring my presence in photos, too.
    I guess this could be useful if I ever have to go on the run, but it might be problematic the next time I have to deal with the irrepressible bonhomie of Homeland Security.

    Grant Hutchison
    Do automatic doors open for you?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jpocNciB3cg
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  2. #8882
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    I needed to install a cat door, so I decided to go all out and install a Stargate.



    With chevron 7 locked.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


    That is the best.

    Thus proving that cats are alien gods come to rule us.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  3. #8883
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post


    That is the best.

    Thus proving that cats are alien gods come to rule us.
    The Egyptian already knew that.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  4. #8884
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    I had a dream last night. I don't remember the entire thing - I rarely do - but I do remember how it ended.

    In the dream, I had gone to bed and fallen asleep (yes, I dreamt that I was sleeping). I could hear my wife calling for me, but I couldn't respond because I couldn't wake up, and I was trying very hard to force myself awake. When I did finally wake up in the dream, I actually woke up from the dream, in real life. It was only about five minutes before the alarm was set to go off, so I just went ahead and got up and got ready.

    I asked my wife if I was making noises right before I woke up (in the dream, I was grunting with frustration while trying to wake up), and she confirmed that I was.
    Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn

  5. #8885
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    I just purchased six LED bulbs for my dining room chandelier. Knowing that there are sometimes incompatiblities, I replaced one bulb. It worked great.

    So I replaced the other five. Now they all work very poorly. Huh?

    Quick solution was to replace one bulb with an incandescent. Now they are all happy. Long term solution is to replace the dimmer. - Apparently, there is a minimum load required for the dimmer to operate.
    I have precisely the same issue, and have not yet gotten around to the same long term solution. I'm expecting that a more modern dimmer switch will have been designed to handle the lower load of LED bulbs.
    Conserve energy. Commute with the Hamiltonian.

  6. #8886
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    Old style dimmers for incandescent, are thyristors for the 60 hz supply, they do have a minimum setting and load requirement. Dimmable leds use a different protocol pwm signals. Often the new leds have regulators, so if you try to reduce voltage on them thay actally take more current.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  7. #8887
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    I've been teaching my son to drive a car since the middle of July. He seems to be doing ok.

    Today he came home with all of the paperwork for him to start taking flying lessons as a part of his high school curriculum. I read the stuff over and over. He has a set number of hours in a simulator and 8 hours of actual flight time this year. Next week, he starts the simulator training two weeks before school actually starts, because I guess that is important before one gets their hands on the controls of a real airplane?

    I guess I am one big wimp for being nervous in the car with him at the wheel.
    Solfe

  8. #8888
    Solfe your son will probably do better than me learning how to drive. I tried when I was sixteen to learn from my grandfather. It did not go well I ended up in the ditch in front of his friends house down the road from here, either that or crash into the school bus. (The irony would be my grandfather was a school bus driver.)

    Years later I decided to go thru a driving school. The teacher was a retired high school shop teacher. He knew my grandfather and other members of the family including a great uncle who was a fireman. The driving instructor told me a story of grand uncle driving a fire truck across a causeway with his knees while lighting his pipe.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    http://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  9. #8889
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Backroad Astronomer View Post
    Solfe your son will probably do better than me learning how to drive. I tried when I was sixteen to learn from my grandfather. It did not go well I ended up in the ditch in front of his friends house down the road from here, either that or crash into the school bus. (The irony would be my grandfather was a school bus driver.)

    Years later I decided to go thru a driving school. The teacher was a retired high school shop teacher. He knew my grandfather and other members of the family including a great uncle who was a fireman. The driving instructor told me a story of grand uncle driving a fire truck across a causeway with his knees while lighting his pipe.
    What kills me is, it is actually harder to do the right thing than the thing that works. I was tempted to listen to my wife and send him off to school, but I don't think he would really learn like that. He is a master of gassing people if he doesn't care. And it seems he slow at learning to care about how dangerous a car is.

    When I was 8 or 9, I knew how to drive a motorcycle. My best friend's mom bought her son a motorcycle. In retrospect, I suspect that had something to do with the vicious divorce they all went through. When he popped the clutch and flipped the bike through the back window of his mom's VW Rabbit, that bike was mine. Effectively anyway*. It disappeared after the first snow. Pity, because I was looking forward to driving on ice.

    By 16, I had a Honda CB 450 and a 1979 Toyota Corolla. By 18, I got my car driver's license. By 21, I was on to my second motorcycle and got a licence to match. From what I gather from my son, they won't let you do that anymore. Funny how the laws get more and more serious as time goes on.

    Trying to do the right thing, I have been taking him out for 30 minutes a day, every day. It is much slower progress than letting him buy his own vehicle and letting him take it out unsupervised.

    My wife has this wonderful monologue about how I would have been better off being raised by wolves.

    *Back in the day, I don't think the words "closed head injury" was a thing. And that was exactly what happened to my friend. He smacked his head on the pavement, no helmet. He could barely ride a bicycle for months after that. As far as I know, he didn't even get checked out by a doctor. How did we all survive?

    My son got drilled in the head by a baseball and I had nightmares for weeks. It was bad. Random daily nosebleeds for weeks. We had him to 3 different doctors. Oddly, I remember the same thing happening to me as a kid and never going to the doctors. Again, how did we not survive and then grew up to put a precedence on child care?
    Solfe

  10. #8890
    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    By 16, I had a Honda CB 450 and a 1979 Toyota Corolla. By 18, I got my car driver's license. By 21, I was on to my second motorcycle and got a licence to match. From what I gather from my son, they won't let you do that anymore. Funny how the laws get more and more serious as time goes on.
    I wonder why that would be I can few people could be the reason.

    But my niece is also learning to drive. Mostly from the brother in law he probably driven almost anything a civilian could drive on land and sea. Also a friend of the family is giving her a car. The called my sister and told them and my sister reaction is "you can't just give her a car." The family friend said,"oh yes I can."

    It was hard for me to learn to drive because I never learned to ride a bike so learning to steer was a hard.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    http://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  11. #8891
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    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    *Back in the day, I don't think the words "closed head injury" was a thing. And that was exactly what happened to my friend. He smacked his head on the pavement, no helmet. He could barely ride a bicycle for months after that. As far as I know, he didn't even get checked out by a doctor. How did we all survive?

    My son got drilled in the head by a baseball and I had nightmares for weeks. It was bad. Random daily nosebleeds for weeks. We had him to 3 different doctors. Oddly, I remember the same thing happening to me as a kid and never going to the doctors. Again, how did we not survive and then grew up to put a precedence on child care?
    This is what really bothers me about that whole "we did [ridiculously unsafe] thing when I was a kid, and I'm fine, so why can't kids today do it?" Often, the answer is that other kids didn't survive, and we've now decided to maybe stop those unnecessary deaths. We've swung to the overprotective a bit, I feel, but there's a reason we don't let kids ride in the back of trucks going down the freeway, you know?
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  12. #8892
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    Some days I manage to be amused by this:
    The only time I ever received a life threatening injury as a child was when I was doing something under adult "supervision" which my parents thought would be good for me, but which I, at the age of eight, thought was a catastrophically stupid idea.

    But the good news is that I have a dent in my skull just right of centre which allows me to balance an orange on top of my head, thereby freaking out a whole new generation.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  13. #8893
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    My wife works in a colonoscopy clinic. Sometimes she has to work late, usually because of something called a "foreign body". They are never from aliens.

    Technically, the proper term is endoscopy clinic but my wife never calls it that. I recently found out this means they can scope either end of a human. It also explains the large number of pills and food objects my wife has described. This makes the stories far less alarming.

    Edit - It is alarming to know that some people get to the point where swallowing a pill is impossible. Some days, I think I couldn't possibly swallow a pill, but apparently this is massively different than really not being able to swallow a pill.
    Last edited by Solfe; 2018-Aug-15 at 01:26 AM.
    Solfe

  14. #8894
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    We've swung to the overprotective a bit, I feel, but there's a reason we don't let kids ride in the back of trucks going down the freeway, you know?
    That is one of those that bothers me a lot (riding in the back of a pickup). From when I lived in Louisiana in the 80s, I still remember a story about about a family that had like six kids riding in the back of a pickup that flipped on the highway. Everyone in the cab survived, everyone riding in the back was killed.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  15. #8895
    Well I fall of the back of one thankfully going really slow, a lot of road rash and stuff. I did so because it was the only way to a job when I was teenager. (The company normally used an old school bus but it broke down.) Not a safe place to travel. I actually remember a great uncle telling me and my grandfather about a time where a tank flipped over and he was on the back. It was over a ditch and he fall into the ditch before the tank came down on him. The dug from underneath to get him out.

    I think the reason we tell these stories is probably a little cautionary tale plus I think at such things just helps get over it.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    http://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  16. #8896
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    In honor of one of Gillian's sig lines, today's CakeWrecks.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  17. #8897
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    The cake in the episode of Judging Amy that it's lifted from says "Happy Borthday."
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  18. #8898
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    Probably not particularly funny unless you've grown up with good old-fashioned British police constables treading the beat, or have watched British police drama from a bygone era.
    The newly appointed Chief Constable of Police Scotland (which has been a rather troubled organization of late) has announced that he's going to champion an environment that protects and encourages whistle-blowers.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  19. #8899
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Probably not particularly funny unless you've grown up with good old-fashioned British police constables treading the beat, or have watched British police drama from a bygone era.
    The newly appointed Chief Constable of Police Scotland (which has been a rather troubled organization of late) has announced that he's going to champion an environment that protects and encourages whistle-blowers.

    Grant Hutchison
    A bit on the nose there isn't it.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    http://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

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