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Thread: Really trivial stuff that amuses you...

  1. #9781
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    I wonder if more scalpels get used for precise paper cutting than for cutting humans. I've used Xacto knives for years and I think they are basically scalpels.
    All the same technology, I'm sure. I use Swann-Morton surgical scalpels because: 1) That's what I'm used to; 2) I like the attachment between blade and handle; 3) There's a fingers-free detachment and disposal system; 4) You can buy non-sterile scalpel blades by the 100, fairly cheaply.

    Grant Hutchison

  2. #9782
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    Quote Originally Posted by publiusr View Post
    This shouldn't really be funny...but:
    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/...et/1740780001/
    SyFy Channel writers are working furiously on next summer’s movies!


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  3. #9783
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    SyFy Channel writers are working furiously on next summer’s movies!
    News from 2021:
    Methed-Up Gator-Nado VI was this year's winner at the Academy Awards for "Best Example of Why We Don't Let Just Any Movie Walk in the Door Here."

  4. #9784
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    The reviving of the "Reality" thread after months of merciful dormancy.

  5. #9785
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    Our local NBC affiliate, KPRC, did a special last night on Apollo 11. (They were responsible for the television feed of the mission.) As part of it - for reasons I didn't get but don't care - they showed footage of Buzz Aldrin some years later punching a certain conspiracy theorist. (They didn't mention his name and I won't either.) And then showed it again in case you missed it the first time.
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  6. #9786
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    Our local NBC affiliate, KPRC, did a special last night on Apollo 11. (They were responsible for the television feed of the mission.) As part of it - for reasons I didn't get but don't care - they showed footage of Buzz Aldrin some years later punching a certain conspiracy theorist. (They didn't mention his name and I won't either.) And then showed it again in case you missed it the first time.
    Hence the boxing gloves in the banner above!

    Meanwhile it took me a moment to get the current XKCD. Probiotic and antibiotic are like matter and antimatter, I guess.

    Then it occurred to me I will shortly be making a delicious salad combining pasta and antipasto....

    BOOM??
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  7. #9787
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Meanwhile it took me a moment to get the current XKCD. Probiotic and antibiotic are like matter and antimatter, I guess.
    I get it all too well. Though the BOOM is usually inside of my GI tract.

    He's done a few on GI issues; this one is one of my favorites. I wonder if he has problems.
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  8. #9788
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hornblower View Post
    The reviving of the "Reality" thread after months of merciful dormancy.
    Ninety posts in the three days since it started up again. Much ado about something I find excruciatingly boring. I have better boring things to do with my time, such as cleaning up the clutter in my house. Somewhere in the process I hope to find a missing electronic device I need to program my model trains with my computer. Not to mention the boring warmup exercises and technical drill on my horn to prepare me to play real music well. While doing that I pass the time by reading astronomical and other interesting material.

  9. #9789
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    Our local NBC affiliate, KPRC, did a special last night on Apollo 11. (They were responsible for the television feed of the mission.) As part of it - for reasons I didn't get but don't care - they showed footage of Buzz Aldrin some years later punching a certain conspiracy theorist. (They didn't mention his name and I won't either.) And then showed it again in case you missed it the first time.
    Not too long ago I read an account of that fight somewhere online. According to that article Buzz tried to avoid a fight by walking away, but the guy cornered him and reportedly started jabbing him with a Bible while demanding a response. That's when Buzz hauled off and punched him in self-defense. It appears to have been a great case of a big bully getting gobsmacked by a smaller but strong and ethically superior man.

  10. #9790
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    Some co workers have gone from a long loud conversation 6 m away, to a long loud erasing of permanent marker off a whiteboard.

    (Maybe they could make the body of the permanents stippled or something so the different feel would act as a warning?)
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.
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  11. #9791
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hornblower View Post
    Not too long ago I read an account of that fight somewhere online. According to that article Buzz tried to avoid a fight by walking away, but the guy cornered him and reportedly started jabbing him with a Bible while demanding a response. That's when Buzz hauled off and punched him in self-defense. It appears to have been a great case of a big bully getting gobsmacked by a smaller but strong and ethically superior man.
    Indeed. And the bully tried to sue, which the judge wasn't going for.
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  12. #9792
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    Quote Originally Posted by pzkpfw View Post
    Some co workers have gone from a long loud conversation 6 m away, to a long loud erasing of permanent marker off a whiteboard.

    (Maybe they could make the body of the permanents stippled or something so the different feel would act as a warning?)
    I remember once when some expert on some database was explaining things to a room full of employees, myself included. He had put a lot of stuff on the whiteboard in various colors, but at some point must have picked up a "permanent' marker.

    So, he grabs the eraser to wipe the whole board to introduce some other concept, and all of it comes off except for one square with the word "MEMORY" scrawled within. It resists erasing, and he stares at it.

    "I guess," I said aloud, "that's non-volatile memory."

    We all had a laugh as he looked for some cleaning fluid.
    Last edited by DonM435; 2019-Jul-19 at 07:15 PM. Reason: typo

  13. #9793
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hornblower View Post
    Ninety posts in the three days since it started up again. Much ado about something I find excruciatingly boring. I have better boring things to do with my time, such as cleaning up the clutter in my house. Somewhere in the process I hope to find a missing electronic device I need to program my model trains with my computer. Not to mention the boring warmup exercises and technical drill on my horn to prepare me to play real music well. While doing that I pass the time by reading astronomical and other interesting material.
    I just now found the missing device. It was on the floor, under some clutter I had foolishly been pushing around instead of properly stowing or disposing of it. I managed to laugh at myself about it.

  14. #9794
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hornblower View Post
    I just now found the missing device. It was on the floor, under some clutter I had foolishly been pushing around instead of properly stowing or disposing of it. I managed to laugh at myself about it.
    Please post model train pictures!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  15. #9795
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    (They didn't mention his name and I won't either.) And then showed it again in case you missed it the first time.
    Around these parts we should just use his initials which also sums up his work: b. s.

  16. #9796
    While typing something I meant cosmonaut but type cosmoquest.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
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  17. #9797
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    There is a highly amusing moment in Walt Disney's Fantasia that perhaps is not so trivial, as it is indicative of his great talent as an entertainer. In the Dance of the Hours episode, there is a dainty violin pizzicato (plucking the string) that accompanies the visual gag of an elephant sitting down hard as a bubble bursts under it. The whole scene is a juxtaposition of the elegant and the grotesque, with elephants and hippos as ballet dancers.

  18. #9798
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hornblower View Post
    There is a highly amusing moment in Walt Disney's Fantasia that perhaps is not so trivial, as it is indicative of his great talent as an entertainer. In the Dance of the Hours episode, there is a dainty violin pizzicato (plucking the string) that accompanies the visual gag of an elephant sitting down hard as a bubble bursts under it. The whole scene is a juxtaposition of the elegant and the grotesque, with elephants and hippos as ballet dancers.
    And topless centaurs.

    Meanwhile, we love our new house, and its complete lack of carpets. When we see all the dust bunnies kitties that accumulate around the place, and realize that was all going into the carpets, oh my! But my wife likes to keep the place cool and my feet get cold. I don't wear socks in the summer, don't wear shoes in the house, and my slippers are less than satisfactory.

    I'm wearing hospital socks.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  19. #9799
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    ... Meanwhile, we love our new house, and its complete lack of carpets. ... I don't wear socks in the summer, don't wear shoes in the house, and my slippers are less than satisfactory.

    I'm wearing hospital socks.
    One word: traction. Unless you have it you could end up in it.
    Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by ignorance or stupidity.
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    You know, the very powerful and the very stupid have one thing in common. They don’t alter their views to fit the facts. They alter the facts to fit their views.
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  20. #9800
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    One word: traction. Unless you have it you could end up in it.
    That's a feature of the hospital socks, of course.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  21. #9801
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    I defused a very small international incident last night.
    Walked into a hotel dining room to encounter a very tired-looking American having a bit of a barney with a server for whom English was a second language. They sounded as if they were on their third or fourth trip around a loop of miscommunication.
    Server: "But it's not goat steak, it's entrecôte steak."
    American guest: "You keep telling me it's not goat, and then saying it's some kind of goat. I don't want goat steak!"

    When I translated entrecôte into English as "a rib cut, with no bone", the server said "Thank you!" in relieved tones, and the American said, "I have never heard that word before in my life!" in tones that hinted the server and I might just have made it up to annoy him. He seemed to enjoy his steak, though, and thanks were later issued all round.

    (I only mention this chap's nationality because I suspect it has some bearing on his not recognizing the word entrecôte.)

    Grant Hutchison

  22. #9802
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    (I only mention this chap's nationality because I suspect it has some bearing on his not recognizing the word entrecôte.)
    Not surprising. Linguistic facility (or a lack thereof) aside, it's a term of art that one is not very likely to see 'in the wild' here. I've encountered it abroad of course but I can't recall a single instance in the US...but then, I've never dined in a Michelin-starred restaurant.
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  23. #9803
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    Not surprising. Linguistic facility (or a lack thereof) aside, it's a term of art that one is not very likely to see 'in the wild' here.
    I suspected as much. We have a few more French borrowings in the UK, and entrecôte is a standard descriptor on British menus. (There's a considerable divergence between British and American English when it comes to the names of cuts of beef, I think.)

    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    I've encountered it abroad of course but I can't recall a single instance in the US...but then, I've never dined in a Michelin-starred restaurant.
    This was a little place in the wilds of Norway, with a fixed dinner menu - a look at the menu suggests that the Norwegian for entrecôte is entrecôte.

    FWIW, my own assessment of Michelin-starred dining looks like this:
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Grant Hutchison

  24. #9804
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    (I only mention this chap's nationality because I suspect it has some bearing on his not recognizing the word entrecôte.)
    I also haven't heard the term used in the US, and would never use it, though I would guess what it means because I lived in France when I was a kid, so it's pretty clear that it means something like "inside ribs".
    As above, so below

  25. #9805
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I suspected as much. We have a few more French borrowings in the UK, and entrecôte is a standard descriptor on British menus. (There's a considerable divergence between British and American English when it comes to the names of cuts of beef, I think.)
    Yeah, and speaking of which, in some other thread you mentioned that your grandmother (perhaps) built a conservatory in her house. For me, the only possible meaning of that word is a music college. I had never heard it used to mean what we call a greenhouse.
    As above, so below

  26. #9806
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    I think I learned what a conservatory is from the game "Clue".
    As for "entrecôte", I've never encountered the term.

    While it sounded like the American was acting like, well, the stereotypical "ugly American", I can understand his aversion to something called entrail-goat.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  27. #9807
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    Really trivial stuff that amuses you...

    Mostly in the US I’ve seen entrecôte used when a restaurant is trying to make their menu or a dish sound a bit fancy, or if the eatery truly specializes in French cuisine. Almost always the cut of steak is listed (Delmonico, Rib-Eye, Filet mignon, etc.).

    And it ain’t just steak. Walked into a little place in Inverness many years ago and ordered steaks and baked potatoes. My wife asked for sour cream and I thought the server was going to lose her lunch.

    The day before we had lunch at the Charles Dickens Inn, decorated with small illustrations of famous characters such as Fezzywig, Oliver Twist, etc. Which went well with the hibachis on each table and the yakatori chicken.

  28. #9808
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    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    The day before we had lunch at the Charles Dickens Inn, decorated with small illustrations of famous characters such as Fezzywig, Oliver Twist, etc. Which went well with the hibachis on each table and the yakatori chicken.
    Just a nitpick but it should be yakitori. The "yaki" incidentally means something like "cook" and is that same word as in yakisoba and teriyaki.
    As above, so below

  29. #9809
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    Yeah, and speaking of which, in some other thread you mentioned that your grandmother (perhaps) built a conservatory in her house. For me, the only possible meaning of that word is a music college. I had never heard it used to mean what we call a greenhouse.
    The music college would still be a conservatoire in British English, though that's bordering on obsolete usage. A conservatory is nowadays distinct from a greenhouse in the UK, the former being specifically a glassed-in extension to your house, mainly for relaxing in, with only a secondary (or absent) role in nurturing plants. They were notoriously the subject of cold calls for a few years, until everyone who might be susceptible to the idea had a UPVC monstrosity tacked on the side of their house.

    Grant Hutchison

  30. #9810
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    While it sounded like the American was acting like, well, the stereotypical "ugly American", I can understand his aversion to something called entrail-goat.
    I really wasn't trying to convey an "American abroad" stereotype. The guy just looked exhausted - if I had to guess, he was suffering from a bout of "extended foreign travel fatigue", when you get to the point that every single thing about being in a foreign country seems to be unreasonably difficult to do or comprehend. Been there, done that.

    Grant Hutchison

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