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Thread: Really trivial stuff that amuses you...

  1. #8731
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    Hey Solfe!

    I've had the good fortune to be able to participate in "live action storytelling" again, (you ought to try it Dr. Grant), and I've been wanting to ask you for years now, what games has your family been in involved with producing?

    I've finally bit the bullet and started that campaign I mentioned where I spent a good year or so unknowingly plagiarizing the Jackaroo Series. I've had three sit down games of it so far and everybody loves it. As to which era, they rolled Late Third Era as a starting point.

    Though it would require its own thread to tell right.

    But also, last weekend started a new Shadowrun campaign! One of my favorite games!

    I'm so happy.

    Hey SkepticJ!

    Since Clev is awol you're going to have to be skeptical for him!

    What do you think of complex rules internally consistent that allows a heavily cybered man on foot to accelerate to 84mph in 9 seconds? And without resorting to gross cyberlimb replacement?

    (In an urban setting you couldn't escape from one in most cars!)

    You start with bone lacing, (several varieties) which isn't skeletal replacement but structural enhancements to cortical bone. The marrow isn't messed with.

    Permanently toned "artificial" muscle. The higher end versions of this treatment the replaced muscles are grown from your own cells and are twice as dense as normal toned male muscle tissue.

    "Wired reflexes", since the advent of ASSIST technology, which converts nerve signals to computer signals and vise versa, depending "how deep into the chrome" you wish to go, you can replace your spinal cord and main nerve trunks with fiber optics, greatly increasing one's reaction time. Average high end wires is three times faster than an unmodified human can possibly react. Excruciating detailed characters can generate a little more than four and a half times normal fastest human reaction time.

    "Synthecardium" A living sac surrounding your heart to mechanically assist in blood pumping during heavy exertion. As a side effect also protects the heart and aortas from direct trauma having characteristics similar to Kevlar.

    Dermal plate. Subcutaneous armor, also greatly increases the bodies structural integrity. Three levels. Level three you look like an insect.

    And finally, orthoskin. Bone ossicles directly under your skin. Also comes in three levels. Helps keep the soles of your feet on when running at 84 miles an hour...

    And that's only a small part of what's available and the combinations are near endless.

    One downside is the heavily cybered can be extremely heavy for their volume. The person above would occupy the same volume as a six foot tall, 220 pound man but actually weigh close to 600 pounds.

    I make them pay for custom clothing and automobile suspension if they want to pretend to be normal.
    Time wasted having fun is not time wasted - Lennon
    (John, not the other one.)

  2. #8732
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    It's a little company. They product the Hack series of games. Classical Hack is their main title.

    What may be of bigger interest is the models my dad builds for the demo games.

    Here is just one picture of the game being set up for play.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Edit - Scale... hahaha! Those are 25 mm figures in the foreground next to 12 inch ruler. The siege towers are about 8-10" tall.
    Last edited by Solfe; 2018-Jun-28 at 01:51 AM.
    Solfe

  3. #8733
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    Oh!

    I wanna play!
    Time wasted having fun is not time wasted - Lennon
    (John, not the other one.)

  4. #8734
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDon View Post
    Oh!

    I wanna play!
    My dad does a lot of cons all over the country, if he heads out the Cali this year, I let you know.

    It takes about 3 months to build the city you see in the images. He builds them in 3'x6' or 4'x6' sections for transport. If you look at the edge of the table, you can see some warping between the sections. That table was 24 feet long and about 12 feet wide if I remember correctly. A game on this scale takes 2 teams of 6 people about 4 hours to complete. A smaller game on a 4x6 table takes like 2 hours. It's fast.
    Solfe

  5. #8735
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    Oh, and another funny tidbit about the game. It was created in the 1990s and all of the games have the word "Hack" in them.

    Over the years, a great number of people have reached out to my dad asking if he can provide tools or information on hacking computers. My dad knows nothing about computers, so he gets super nervous when that happens. Sometimes, he reaches out to law enforcement depending on the content of the inquiry. There is a bit more comedy involved in this, because sometimes law enforcement asks my dad what he does for a living. My dad has learned not to answer "Wargamer". "Game developer" or "historian" gets a completely different response.
    Solfe

  6. #8736
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    I finally tracked down an old paper from 1962 I've been trying to get my hands on. It's one of those references more often quoted than read, and it's frequently quoted with the wrong date. It's also often credited to "Ing E. Sänger" or "Sänger, IE."

    When I got the paper this morning, I see the author credit is to "Prof. Dr. Ing. E. Sänger" - The "Ing" is part of the abbreviation for a German PhD in Engineering, not a first name! My, it must sting a little to see your paper widely quoted under such a stupidly wrong name (I have several that misspell my second name, and that's pretty annoying).
    Then again, since the conclusions were erroneous and generated a myth that persists to this day, maybe deniability was useful.

    Grant Hutchison
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    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  7. #8737
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    If it is a cookie we both like. Lucky for my waistline, she usually buys things I don't like (like things poisoned with coconut).
    I hate the taste of coconut, at first I thought it may be just the texture. I've since tried coconut milk and that had the same effect, coconut makes me puke.

  8. #8738
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Then again, since the conclusions were erroneous and generated a myth that persists to this day, maybe deniability was useful.
    Okay, now you've piqued my curiosity. What was the paper about and what myth did it create?
    Conserve energy. Commute with the Hamiltonian.

  9. #8739
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grey View Post
    Okay, now you've piqued my curiosity. What was the paper about and what myth did it create?
    The paper's entitled "Some optical and kinematic effects in interstellar astronautics" - one of the very early treatments of the appearance of the sky from a relativistic starship, which is something I've been writing about of late.
    Sänger originated the idea of a "starbow" - a dark area behind the spacecraft, populated by invisible stars radiating in IR and radio, and a dark area ahead populated by invisible stars radiating in UV and X-rays, while between the two there's a circular rainbow of stars ranging from violet at the front edge to red at the rear edge. Frederik Pohl picked up on the idea and publicized it in a novella entitled "The Gold At The Starbow's End" (1972) - "starbow" was Pohl's coining (although he got the colours the wrong way round).

    It was soon realized that Sänger's model was bad, and didn't take into account the actual approximate black-body spectrum of the stars. Subsequent authors on the topic kept trying to drive a stake in the heart of the "starbow", but it was still appearing in SF at least up to the early 1990s, and you can find current internet mention of it.

    Grant Hutchison
    Last edited by grant hutchison; 2018-Jun-28 at 08:38 PM. Reason: Oops. Got the colours the wrong way round myself
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  10. #8740
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    I wonder if the starbow idea is the origin of some of the rainbow-like special effects that are used in science fiction TV and movies FTL. I'm not saying the effects are realistic, I just wonder if that is where they got the idea.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  11. #8741
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    The paper's entitled "Some optical and kinematic effects in interstellar astronautics" - one of the very early treatments of the appearance of the sky from a relativistic starship, which is something I've been writing about of late.
    Sänger originated the idea of a "starbow" - a dark area behind the spacecraft, populated by invisible stars radiating in IR and radio, and a dark area ahead populated by invisible stars radiating in UV and X-rays, while between the two there's a circular rainbow of stars ranging from violet at the rear edge to red at the front edge....(although he got the colours the wrong way round).
    Wow, that's an obvious error, and one that should have been quickly fixed.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  12. #8742
    People who don't what quantum physics is and abuses to fit there new age stuff.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    http://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  13. #8743
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    I wonder if the starbow idea is the origin of some of the rainbow-like special effects that are used in science fiction TV and movies FTL. I'm not saying the effects are realistic, I just wonder if that is where they got the idea.
    A guy called Stephen R. Wilk actually looked into that. He traced the cinematic visual effect back to the original Star Trek movie in 1979 - that's certainly the earliest I recall seeing it, too. He didn't turn up any evidence linking that effect to the starbow concept, but it certainly possible that an SF buff in the 70s would have Pohl's award-winning novella in mind.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  14. #8744
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    Quote Originally Posted by George View Post
    Wow, that's an obvious error, and one that should have been quickly fixed.
    Yes, it's why I spent some time and effort to get my hands on an original copy of the article. Recurring errors in the citation tend to ring alarm bells that everyone's quoting each other, and no-one's going back to source. There's no doubt Sänger got it wrong, but it'll be interesting to see the context in which that actually happened.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  15. #8745
    The new head of the US Space force is....
    https://ascienceenthusiast.com/trump...y-space-force/
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    http://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  16. #8746
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    . . . An obvious satire?
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  17. #8747
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    The paper's entitled "Some optical and kinematic effects in interstellar astronautics" - one of the very early treatments of the appearance of the sky from a relativistic starship, which is something I've been writing about of late.
    Sänger originated the idea of a "starbow" - a dark area behind the spacecraft, populated by invisible stars radiating in IR and radio, and a dark area ahead populated by invisible stars radiating in UV and X-rays, while between the two there's a circular rainbow of stars ranging from violet at the front edge to red at the rear edge. Frederik Pohl picked up on the idea and publicized it in a novella entitled "The Gold At The Starbow's End" (1972) - "starbow" was Pohl's coining (although he got the colours the wrong way round).

    It was soon realized that Sänger's model was bad, and didn't take into account the actual approximate black-body spectrum of the stars. Subsequent authors on the topic kept trying to drive a stake in the heart of the "starbow", but it was still appearing in SF at least up to the early 1990s, and you can find current internet mention of it.

    Grant Hutchison
    What a shame it isn't real, it sounds like it would be beautiful.

  18. #8748
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    What a shame it isn't real, it sounds like it would be beautiful.
    Yes. When Pohl found out it didn't exist he wrote, "What's the good of that?" He later turned his (pretty good) novella into a (pretty bad) novel, Starburst, and wrote out the starbow. So he did his bit for reality, but the original concept was so pretty it stuck in everyone's minds.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  19. #8749
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    Today we closed on our house purchase.
    At the settlement table, the title company provided a jar of pens, a bowl of candies, and a bowl of reading glasses.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  20. #8750
    I could of used of these pair of glasses well at least for one eye.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    http://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  21. #8751
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    I flopped on the sofa and opened my mouth to complain about my ribs when the dog jumped up to comfort me.

    All I can say now is: "That was an awful, awful amount of dog tongue in my mouth."
    Solfe

  22. #8752
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    Today we closed on our house purchase.
    At the settlement table, the title company provided a jar of pens, a bowl of candies, and a bowl of reading glasses.
    I could use a pair as well, can't find mine this evening. Sort of sad that they expect buyers to be old enough to need them.
    Congratulations!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  23. #8753
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Sort of sad that they expect buyers to be old enough to need them.
    Says the old guy building a house.

    I don’t see an issue, as older folks have always bought and sold homes. We would have downsized soon, even if my recent job situation didn’t force a move.

    I don’t think it makes a comment either way regarding the average age of homebuyers.

    Congratulations!
    Thank you.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  24. #8754
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    We hope to join you soon, and we're not quite old enough for the glasses! Though I have known a few younger people who could use them. At least it seems clear that they're interested in having you read the whole contract?
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  25. #8755
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    Says the old guy building a house.
    I resemble that remark!

    Meanwhile, I'm several steps down a Wikipedia rabbit hole and have discovered this gem about the Oberon class submarines:
    With the retirement of the Mark 20S torpedo in the 1980s, the stern torpedo tubes were decommissioned and thereafter used for storing beer.[6]
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  26. #8756
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    Quote Originally Posted by George View Post
    Wow, that's an obvious error, and one that should have been quickly fixed.
    I got a chance to read the paper, and it's a remarkable failure of peer review by the British Interplanetary Society, as well as an astonishingly naive treatment by Sänger.
    For simplicity's sake we may assume that the stars in the sky, as seen from the space vehicle when at rest, are all of a medium yellow colour, of perhaps λ0=5900 Å. With the travelling speed increasing, the take-off star changes its colour from yellow to orange and red, finally reaching the limit of visibility towards the infra-red (λ=8000 Å) at v/c = 0.297. With the travelling speed increasing still further, a circular spot develops of increasing diameter forms around the take-off star, which meanwhile has become invisible. Through this spot, all stars let only infra-red light pass through to the vehicle, thus being invisible to the eye.
    And so on ...
    Sänger assumes all stars are monochromatic yellow "for simplicity's sake", and then builds his entire starbow from that obviously unrealistic assumption! It's embarrassing that BIS didn't pick that up in review, and I must say I'm surprised Pohl himself didn't spot the obvious problem with it before he incorporated it into his story.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  27. #8757
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I got a chance to read the paper, and it's a remarkable failure of peer review by the British Interplanetary Society, as well as an astonishingly naive treatment by Sänger.

    And so on ...
    Sänger assumes all stars are monochromatic yellow "for simplicity's sake", and then builds his entire starbow from that obviously unrealistic assumption! It's embarrassing that BIS didn't pick that up in review, and I must say I'm surprised Pohl himself didn't spot the obvious problem with it before he incorporated it into his story.

    Grant Hutchison
    I wonder if it was his renown in the field ( First President of the International Astronautical Federation and the receiver of an Honorary Fellowship of the BIS) that enabled his paper to be given a "soft review"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I resemble that remark!

    Meanwhile, I'm several steps down a Wikipedia rabbit hole and have discovered this gem about the Oberon class submarines:
    There is an Oberon submarine - HMAS Ovens - preserved as a museum ship on a slipway in Fremantle, about 18km from my house.
    Last edited by ozduck; 2018-Jul-01 at 04:05 AM.

  28. #8758
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    I wonder if it was his renown in the field ( First President of the International Astronautical Federation and the receiver of an Honorary Fellowship of the BIS) that enabled his paper to be given a "soft review"?



    There is an Oberon submarine - HMAS Ovens - preserved as a museum ship on a slipway in Fremantle, about 18km from my house.
    I am now picturing an entire torpedo tube full of Fosters, which I've been told is Australian for beer.

    ETA:
    I was actually led down this particular rabbit hole by a post on another forum about Australia buying an expensive drone, which led to another post about the RAN buying an expensive ship, which led me to look up the Royal Australian Navy, which led to their current submarine, which led to....
    Last edited by Trebuchet; 2018-Jul-01 at 02:30 PM.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  29. #8759
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Fosters, which I've been told is Australian for beer.
    As they will tell you, it isn’t.

  30. #8760
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    As they will tell you, it isn’t.
    (I have to jump in and agree with KaiYeves here, sorry.)

    Absolutely correct! It is barely sold in Australia these days. Fosters is part of Anheuser-Busch InBev and has not been Australian owned for years. It was never very popular outside the state of Victoria and I never had a Fosters until I went to the UK in the mid 1970's. As I have read elsewhere, it is about as Australian as "The Outback Steakhouse" - which means not very.
    Last edited by ozduck; 2018-Jul-02 at 08:15 AM.

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