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Thread: How long until we have colonize Mars?

  1. #871
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoshuaDavid View Post
    Has anyone confirm that dragon can support a manned mission yet? If not then it will either be mct or an add on to the sls program. I agree that it would make sense to just rely on spacex but will manned dragon missions be long enough to go to mars?
    Dragon can not yet support a manned mission, but neither can Orion. An uncrewed mission of a complete Dragon V2 is supposed to be launched to the ISS late this year, and a crewed one early next year. Orion won't carry crew until 2023 at the earliest, and will need a heat shield redesign before it can be used on a Mars mission.


    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    The Red Dragon configuration for Mars missions will be a capsule plus a life supporting habitat module. I assume they'll send a lander ahead of time.
    Red Dragon is an uncrewed Dragon V2, with any required modifications to support the payloads. The 2018 mission is to test little more than the entry, descent, and landing on Mars, but they've discussed possible sample return with a small vehicle launched through the top hatch. It should be possible to land some humans with Dragons, but it sounds like their main operations will be with MCTs that can refuel and launch again, and return crew to Earth.

  2. #872
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    on the spacex sub reddit i remember seeing something from elon that said you wouldnt really want to put people in there and go to mars because on the inside it is about the size of an suv

  3. #873
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    Good news for colonizing Mars. The Dutch have grown crops on simulated Martian soil. The result was very encouraging and the food edible.

    http://www.marsdaily.com/reports/Dut...o_eat_999.html

    Dutch scientists said Thursday crops of four vegetables and cereals grown on soil similar to that on Mars have been found safe to eat, amid plans for the first manned mission to the planet.

    Abundant harvests of radishes, peas, rye and tomatoes all grown on the soil were found to contain "no dangerous levels" of heavy metals, said the team from Wageningen University in the Netherlands.

    "These remarkable results are very promising," said senior ecologist Wieger Wamelink.

    "We can actually eat the radishes, peas, rye and tomatoes, and I am very curious what they will taste like."

  4. #874
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    Good. Matt won't starve now.

  5. #875
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    Elon Musk puts more meat on his vision for Mars.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/alexkna.../#7f3b9eb53bc9

    "In a paper summarizing remarks from a recent talk, SpaceX founder and CEO Elon Musk makes his argument for the feasibility of a "self-sustaining city on Mars," further expanding on a vision he initially laid out in 2012 and has continued to refine since then."

    Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk

  6. #876
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    I look for BFR/ITS to change a bit. I hope he goes for all steel Sea Dragon.

  7. #877
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    Lockheed Martin unveils fully reusable crewed M is just over a decade away, and Lockheed Martin revealed Thursday how humans might soon walk upon the red planet's surface.
    artian lander. It can also be used for the moon.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2017/09/28/lock...an-lander.html

    Lockheed Martin gave CNBC a first look at its new spacecraft prototype, which the company will unveil Thursday at this year's International Astronautical Congress in Adelaide, Australia.

    "This is a single-stage, completely reusable lander which will be able to both descend and ascend," said Lockheed Martin's Robert Chambers.

    Chambers is a senior systems engineer at the aerospace and defense giant, helping to lead the Mars Base Camp project. The concept is Lockheed Martin's vision for what may come after NASA's Deep Space Gateway mission, which will begin in the early 2020s.

  8. #878
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    Elon Musk hopes to have boots on the ground on Mars by 2024.

    https://spaceflightnow.com/2017/09/2...round-in-2024/

    SpaceX plans to begin construction of a new rocket and spacecraft next year that could lead to human landings on Mars as early as 2024, scaling up technologies currently being perfected with the company’s Falcon 9 family of boosters to ensure reliability, reusability and, as a result, realistically low costs, founder Elon Musk said Friday.

    Musk first unveiled his long-range plans for exploring and eventually colonizing Mars last year. On Friday, speaking at the International Astronautical Congress in Adelaide, Australia, he provided an updated architecture featuring a single, somewhat smaller spacecraft and more important, he said, a viable way to fund the program.

    “In last year’s presentation, we were really searching for how to pay for this thing. We went through various ideas, Kickstarter, you know, collecting underpants,” he joked. “These didn’t pan out. But now we think we’ve got a way to do it, which is to have a smaller vehicle — it’s still pretty big — but one that can do everything that’s needed.”

    The idea, he continued, is to make SpaceX’s current fleet of Falcon 9 rockets, the yet-to-fly Falcon Heavy and its Dragon cargo/crew ships “redundant.”

    “We want to have one system, one booster and ship that replaces Falcon 9, Falcon Heavy and Dragon,” he said. “If we can do that, then all the resources that are used for Falcon 9 Heavy and Dragon can be applied to this system. That’s really fundamental.”

    The new rocket is still known as the BFR, a euphemism for “Big (fill-in-the-blank) Rocket.”

  9. #879
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    Can we live on Mars permanently?

    http://www.planetary.org/blogs/guest...isru-tech.html

    What do we mean when we say an environment is “habitable”? When referring to exoplanets, the term “habitability” is usually equated to whether or not liquid water can exist on the planet’s surface. But that doesn’t always answer the question of whether humans can inhabit a given environment. After all, Earth’s South Pole doesn’t have liquid water on the surface. Neither does low-Earth orbit. Yet resourceful humans have been inhabiting both locations for decades.

    What about Mars? Mars is on the outer boundary of our solar system’s habitable zone, and we know what looks like briny, liquid water can exist on the surface for short periods of time. But does that really make Mars habitable? From a practical standpoint, the answer depends on what technologies we bring there to create our own artificial habitable zones on the surface.

    Long-term habitation on Mars will require us to master the conversion of raw Martian materials into resources we can use to survive. Fortunately, Mars has a wealth of these materials, making it arguably the most human-habitable place in the solar system, other than the Earth itself.

  10. #880
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    When we start colonising Mars, we most probably need a transit base orbiting Mars. What better than covert one of the Mars moons as a base.

    Before that we need to learn more about the moon and their composition. We now have a tool to help us in this quest - Mars Odyssey. After 16 years observing Mars, it has trained its camera and instruments on Mars moons.

    https://www.space.com/38378-mars-ody...bos-photo.html

    After 16 years of orbiting the Red Planet, NASA's record-breaking Mars Odyssey spacecraft has captured its first photos of the Martian moon Phobos.

    Mars Odyssey launched in 2001 and is the oldest operational spacecraft at the Red Planet. Since it arrived at Mars, the spacecraft has only looked down at the Martian surface and hasn't been pointing its cameras up at Mars' moons. But on Sept. 29, Mars Odyssey snapped its first-ever images of the potato-shaped moon Phobos.

    The spacecraft's Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) camera has helped researchers study the composition of Mars by providing both visible-light and infrared images of the planet's surface. Now that Mars Odyssey has shown that it is capable of imaging moons as well, the mission can begin to do the same types of observations of both Martian moons, Phobos and Deimos.

  11. #881
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    It would take 100 thousand years to fully terraform Mars, according to estimates. But I suppose if you don't mind living under domes for your entire lives (and it appears we don't, given our proclivity for shopping malls) then we might have a Martian colony sooner than that.
    "Occam" is the name of the alien race that will enslave us all eventually. And they've got razors for hands. I don't know if that's true but it seems like the simplest answer."

    Stephen Colbert.

  12. #882
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    To understand what it is like living on Mars we try to simulate the environment here on earth. The US has HI-SEAS Mars simulation, the Chinese are building one, the Russians have Mars 500 and now the Europeans also have one.

    http://www.marsdaily.com/reports/In_..._Mars_999.html

    Would-be astronauts in aluminium-coated suits venture out in rovers from a sprawling camp in Oman's barren desert: a simulation by a European venture aiming to one day help humans survive on Mars.

    Behind a barbed wire fence protected by soldiers from the Gulf sultanate, researchers in prefab facilities work away on experiments that include trying to grow vegetables in inhospitable terrain chosen for its resemblance to the red planet.

    Run by the Austrian Space Forum, a mainly volunteer collective, with the backing of the Omani government, the AMADEE-18 Mars Analog Mission has brought together researchers, inventors, space professionals and enthusiasts.

  13. #883
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    The 6th HI-SEAS expedition has started.

    http://www.hawaiitribune-herald.com/...lation-begins/

    [QUOTEThe University of Hawaii’s sixth Mars mission simulation will begin today as another crew starts eight months of isolation inside a dome on Mauna Loa.

    The NASA-funded Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation, or HI-SEAS, tests human behavior and performance during long periods of isolation, similar to what astronauts might experience on a mission to the Red Planet. They are only allowed to venture outside with protective suits and all communications are placed on a 20-minute delay.][/QUOTE]

  14. #884
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    While the HI-SEAS expedition has started in the US in Hawaii (see above).over in Africa another Mars expedition is also starting in Oman.

    http://www.planetary.org/blogs/jason...amadee-18.html

    This month, 25 countries are participating in a simulated Mars mission in southern Oman, near the borders of Yemen and Saudi Arabia. There, in the barren Dhofar Desert, temperatures can top 51 degrees Celsius (125 degrees Fahrenheit), making it a pretty inhospitable spot for humans—just like Mars. The mission, AMADEE-18 (PDF press kit), lasts four weeks, during which five astronauts will live in inflatable habitats and conduct experiments ranging from growing produce to operating robotic field rovers.

    I know about planetary analog missions in general, but mostly just the NASA ones, such as HERA, NEEMO, and Desert RATS. AMADEE is a project of the Austrian Space Forum, a group that links up various corners of Austria's space industry.

    I heard about AMADEE from Sam McNeil, an Associated Press reporter who covers the Middle East and North Africa. Sam and I graduated together from the University of Arizona. He visited the AMADEE-18 crew earlier this month, and although I can't re-post his AP work, I can link to it! First, here's the written story and a very nice photo gallery:

  15. #885
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    To understand what it is like living on Mars we try to simulate the environment here on earth. The US has HI-SEAS Mars simulation, the Chinese are building one, the Russians have Mars 500 and now the Europeans also have one.

    http://www.marsdaily.com/reports/In_..._Mars_999.html
    The Israel has one too - D-Mars

    https://in.reuters.com/article/us-sp...-idINKCN1G20T5

    A team of six Israeli researchers on Sunday ended a four-day Mars habitat experiment in Israel’s Negev desert where they simulated living conditions on the Red Planet, Israel’s Science and Technology Ministry said.

  16. #886
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    HI-SEAS expedition has been suspended because of a medical condition of one of the crew. Imagine if this has happened on Mars or travelling to Mars

    http://www.staradvertiser.com/2018/0...rs-simulation/

    The University of Hawaii at Manoa’s months-long Mars simulation mission was suspended today — five days after it began — because of a medical incident.

    A crew member of the Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation was taken to Hilo Medical Center about 8 a.m. today because of an undisclosed medical condition and was under observation for a few hours before being released, UH spokesman Dan Meisenzahl said.

    In accordance with safety protocols, the crew left the HI-SEAS dome at the 8,200-foot level of Mauna Loa on Hawaii island and the mission has been suspended.

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