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Thread: NASA to launch a new mission to Mars in 2016 - inSight!

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaDeR View Post
    Bummer. I wanted to see TiME succeed.
    Me too.

    The Curiosity Rover is intended to search for organic compounds on Mars, but will it find any?

    On the other hand, we know that Titan has organic compounds in abundance.

    So the decision-makers choose to send more stuff to Mars, and forget about Titan...

    We Earthlings seem to have an obsession with the red planet.

    I can't help remembering a line from Lost in Space: "If we're not on Mars, where are we?"

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colin Robinson View Post
    So the decision-makers choose to send more stuff to Mars, and forget about Titan...
    The decision makers would, if they could, send stuff to Mars AND Titan. They're not 'forgetting' Titan at all.

    But - at the level of a discovery mission budget - the Titan mission presented a LOT of budget risk - a lot of unknown unknowns. In such fiscally constrained times, they HAVE to go with missions that present the least fiscal risk. It's a sad state of affairs, but from a pragmatic point of view, they made the right choice.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by djellison View Post
    The decision makers would, if they could, send stuff to Mars AND Titan. They're not 'forgetting' Titan at all.

    But - at the level of a discovery mission budget - the Titan mission presented a LOT of budget risk - a lot of unknown unknowns. In such fiscally constrained times, they HAVE to go with missions that present the least fiscal risk. It's a sad state of affairs, but from a pragmatic point of view, they made the right choice.
    What sort of unknown unknowns? Or don't you know?

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colin Robinson View Post
    Me too.

    The Curiosity Rover is intended to search for organic compounds on Mars, but will it find any?

    On the other hand, we know that Titan has organic compounds in abundance.

    So the decision-makers choose to send more stuff to Mars, and forget about Titan...

    We Earthlings seem to have an obsession with the red planet.
    Well haven't ya heard ?... Life from Mars could have polluted Earth ! ....
    In an interview with CNN, Krauss said it’s possible Martian life could have “polluted” Earth early in our planet’s history, giving rise to life as we know it today.
    'Tis spoken ! 'Tis written !
    ... Must be possible, plausible (and all those other favoured terms !) ...
    (Just kidding ... couldn't resist ... )

    Cheers

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Selfsim View Post
    Well haven't ya heard ?... Life from Mars could have polluted Earth ! ....
    Actually, yes, Selfsim, I had heard of the idea that micro-organisms could be transferred over interplanetary distances by meteors, e.g. from Mars to Earth or Earth to Mars. If you search back thru the "Life in Space" section of this forum, you will find threads about this.

    'Tis spoken ! 'Tis written !
    ... Must be possible, plausible (and all those other favoured terms !) ...
    (Just kidding ... couldn't resist ... ) Cheers
    If you can't resist indulging in sarcasm, then I hope you enjoy it.

    (It doesn't actually prove much, though.)

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colin Robinson View Post
    What sort of unknown unknowns? Or don't you know?
    In short - we've essentially done Insight before, from an ATLO/contractor point of view ( Phoenix )
    WE've not done TiME (or CHopper) before - therefore the margin for error on budgetting the mission is much much larger.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by djellison View Post
    In short - we've essentially done Insight before, from an ATLO/contractor point of view ( Phoenix )
    WE've not done TiME (or CHopper) before - therefore the margin for error on budgetting the mission is much much larger.
    I see the logic.

    But I still find it sad that the fascinating and intriguing information sent back from Titan by Cassini-Huygens is now not going to be followed up by another mission till heaven knows when.

  8. #38
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    That's very sad indeed, I agree. In an ideal world we'd be flying all three. But with a limited budget- they did the right thing.

  9. #39
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    NASA Evaluates Four Candidate Sites for 2016 Mars Mission



    NASA has narrowed to four the number of potential landing sites for the agency's next mission to the surface of Mars, a 2016 lander to study the planet's interior.

    The stationary Interior Exploration Using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport (InSight) lander is scheduled to launch in March 2016 and land on Mars six months later. It will touch down at one of four sites selected in August from a field of 22 candidates. All four semi-finalist spots lie near each other on an equatorial plain in an area of Mars called Elysium Planitia.
    Everything I need to know I learned through Googling.

  10. #40
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    NASA’s next Mars lander – the InSight spacecraft – 2016

    Could not find any thread dedicated to this upcoming mission. So I am kicking it off with the latest article on it.

    http://www.americaspace.com/?p=71551

    InSight, which stands for Interior Exploration Using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport, is a stationary lander. The vehicle will join NASA’s current pair of surface explorers, Curiosity and Opportunity, which in contrast are mobile rovers. It will touch down near the Martian equator in late 2016 near Curiosity.

    The three legged InSight lander will conduct an unprecedented mission to investigate the Red Planets deep interior – elucidating the nature and evolution of the Martian core, measuring heat flow and sensing for “Marsquakes.”

    The $425 million solar powered lander, its aeroshell and cruise stage are all being fabricated by prime contractor Lockheed Martin in a Denver, Co., clean room.
    I am because we are
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  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    Could not find any thread dedicated to this upcoming mission. So I am kicking it off with the latest article on it.
    Over here: NASA to launch a new mission to Mars in 2016 - InSight.

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by NEOWatcher View Post
    Thanks, I did use the search using "InSight" but got no matches on Tapatalk.
    I am because we are
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  13. #43
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    I merged the two threads.
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  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    Thanks, I did use the search using "InSight" but got no matches on Tapatalk.
    Using my own insight... "Insight" isn't exactly a unique word to search for. I'm sure you got a lot of false hits.

  15. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToSeek View Post
    NASA Evaluates Four Candidate Sites for 2016 Mars Mission[/url]

    After one and a half years, with one more year to go before launch, they have narrowed it down to one site but it is still being studied and the final decisions will only be made end of this year.

    http://www.marsdaily.com/reports/Sin...ander_999.html

    NASA's next mission to Mars, scheduled to launch one year from today to examine the Red Planet's deep interior and investigate how rocky planets like Earth evolved, now has one specific site under evaluation as the best place to land and deploy its science instruments.

  16. #46
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    Won't anyone show the southern highlands some love? Anybody?

    I see two areas screaming for another lander or rover: Hellas (the dark blue oval) and Solis Planum (the area southeast of the Tharsis volcanoes and south of Valles Marineris). Surely we can figure out how to land these things in slightly rougher terrain now?

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  17. #47
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    Progress. InSight is now all built and is going into the testing phase.

    http://www.marsdaily.com/reports/NAS...sight_999.html

    esting is underway on NASA's next mission on the journey to Mars, a stationary lander scheduled to launch in March 2016. The lander is called InSight, an abbreviation for Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport. It is about the size of a car and will be the first mission devoted to understanding the interior structure of the Red Planet.

  18. #48
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    Things are starting to move in preparation of InSight's arrival next year. In this case it was NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) that got moved.

    http://www.marsdaily.com/reports/NAS...rival_999.html

    With its biggest orbit maneuver since 2006, NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) will prepare this week for the arrival of NASA's next Mars lander, InSight, next year.

    A planned 77-second firing of six intermediate-size thrusters on July 29 will adjust the orbit timing of the veteran spacecraft so it will be in position to receive radio transmissions from InSight as the newcomer descends through the Martian atmosphere and touches down on Sept. 28, 2016. These six rocket engines, which were used for trajectory corrections during the spacecraft's flight from Earth to Mars, can each produce about 22 newtons, or five pounds, of thrust.

    "Without making this orbit change maneuver, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter would be unable to hear from InSight during the landing, but this will put us in the right place at the right time," said MRO Project Manager Dan Johnston of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California.

  19. #49
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    Since the last post, InSight got delayed to this year. Latest report indicates all OK for a 5th May launch.

    https://www.space.com/39485-mars-ins...-unfurled.html

    NASA's next Mars mission — a lander designed to probe the Red Planet’s deep interior and eavesdrop on rumbling Marsquakes — is reaching "ship and shoot" status.

  20. #50
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    InSight getting the last few checkups before being shipped to California’s Vandenberg Air Force Base on February 28.

    https://www.leonarddavid.com/nasas-n...ith-insight-2/

    NASA’s next Mars lander is in the final “ship and shoot” phases from California’s Vandenberg Air Force Base – the first interplanetary mission to rocket from that site.

    The Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport (InSight) is undergoing last checkouts here at Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company – builder of the Mars-bound vehicle.

  21. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    InSight getting the last few checkups before being shipped to California’s Vandenberg Air Force Base on February 28.

    https://www.leonarddavid.com/nasas-n...ith-insight-2/
    It is now at California’s Vandenberg Air Force Base.

    https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=7071

    NASA's InSight spacecraft has arrived at Vandenberg Air Force Base in central California to begin final preparations for a launch this May. The spacecraft was shipped from Lockheed Martin Space, Denver, today and arrived at Vandenberg at 3:49 p.m. PST (6:49 p.m. EST). The launch period for InSight opens May 5 and continues through June 8. InSight will be the first mission to look deep beneath the Martian surface, studying the planet's interior by listening for marsquakes and measuring the planet's heat output. It will also be the first planetary spacecraft to launch from the West Coast.

  22. #52
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    Emily Lakdawalla provides you with all the information on the InSight mission.

    http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily...ight-mars.html

    NASA’s next planetary launch is coming up soon. InSight, a mission focused on Mars geophysics, launches atop an Atlas V from Vandenberg Air Force Base during a launch period that opens on May 5, 2018. This post is your one-stop shop for information about InSight’s launch, cruise, and expected mission to Mars. It is based largely on NASA’s as-ever-excellent press kit (PDF, 7MB).

  23. #53
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    Emily Lakdawalla's visit to the cleanroom facility at Vandenberg Air Force Base where NASA's next Mars lander, InSight, is undergoing final preparations for launch.

    http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily...g-insight.html

    The Planetary Society's filmography wizard Merc Boyan accompanied me, and we shot various video that you'll be seeing later, including in The Planetary Post later this month. In this blog, I'll just have stills for you, most of them less silly than this one, which was not taken inside the clean room, but rather inside the control room from which engineers will operate the spacecraft during liftoff.

  24. #54
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    InSight to have two companions on its trip to Mars.

    http://www.spaceflightinsider.com/sp...-mars-mission/

    When the InSight Mars mission launches atop an Atlas V rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, two mini-satellites will be riding on the same rocket. The twin spacecraft, called Mars Cube One (MarCO), are the first NASA CubeSats designed to operate in deep space. The MarCOs were built at the U.S. space agency’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California.

  25. #55
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    This should be an interesting launch/landing and investigation.

  26. #56
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    It launched today at 11:11 GMT. See the Twitter chatter below:

    Launch:
    https://twitter.com/NASAInSight/status/992723454544744448


    Chitchat:
    https://twitter.com/NASAInSight?ref_...Ctwgr%5Eauthor
    Last edited by schlaugh; 2018-May-05 at 02:43 PM.

  27. #57
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    "NASA's InSight Mars Lander Has Left Earth: So What's Next for the Probe?"

    https://www.space.com/40504-nasa-ins...hats-next.html

    Well before that though, beginning 10 days after launch and continuing throughout its cruise phase outwards, InSight will undergo a series of tests and trials to ensure that it is on track and ready for its mission at Mars.

    During InSight's nearly 7-month interplanetary cruise, flight controllers will check out and calibrate of the spacecraft's subsystems and science instruments, track the spacecraft via NASA's Deep Space Network, perform attitude adjustments to orient the solar arrays and antennas, and execute maneuvers to keep the spacecraft on its planned trajectory, according to NASA.

  28. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    "NASA's InSight Mars Lander Has Left Earth: So What's Next for the Probe?"

    https://www.space.com/40504-nasa-ins...hats-next.html
    Not for the probe but for its companions

    https://spaceflightnow.com/2018/05/1...in-deep-space/

    Two CubeSats developed at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory launched May 5 with the InSight mission to Mars have deployed their miniaturized antennas and captured a distant family portrait of the Earth and the moon.

    The twin spacecraft have already set a distance record for CubeSats, and they were moving away from Earth at a range of 1.8 million miles (2.9 million kilometers) as of Wednesday.

    The microprobes are part of the Mars Cube One mission, a technology demonstration project that aims to test the feasibility of operating CubeSats in deep space. If successful, the two testbeds could lay the foundation for miniature spacecraft traveling to the moon, asteroids, comets and the planets, accomplishing focused scientific objectives at significantly lower cost than conventional space probes.

    Known as MarCO for short, the CubeSats accompanied NASA’s InSight spacecraft during its launch May 5 from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. Moments after the InSight probe deployed from the forward end of the upper stage of the mission’s Atlas 5 launcher, the twin MarCO CubeSats released from a carrier mounted to the rocket stage’s aft bulkhead.

  29. #59
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    First course correction toward Mars has been done.

    http://www.marsdaily.com/reports/NAS..._Mars_999.html

    NASA's InSight lander has made its first course correction toward Mars.

    InSight, short for Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport, is the first mission dedicated to exploring the deep interior of Mars.

    The lander is currently encapsulated in a protective aeroshell, which launched on top of an Atlas V 401 rocket on May 5 from Vandenberg Air Force Base in Central California. Yesterday, the spacecraft fired its thrusters for the first time to change its flight path. This activity, called a trajectory correction maneuver, will happen a maximum of six times to guide the lander to Mars.
    .

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    After reading the article, I saw that InSight had made a "loop" around Earth. I suppose this was a gravity assist. I looked for a graphic of the trajectory but could not find any. Does anyone have a graphic of the trajectory?

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