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Thread: Stuff you just don't get.

  1. #3241
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Backroad Astronomer View Post
    Sometimes do you have the feeling you cheesed someone off and don't know it. All I think I did to offend someone was to make smart remark about a friends t-shirt on a video he made. I know afflictions so it did not surprise me.

    Also eating contest. I have eaten a lot in the past but I do not get eaten 20 -30 hotdogs in a setting.
    Ugh! Do you remember that skinny Japanese fellow who won the world championship a few times? 60 sometime hotdogs at a time? I watched a documentary once that covered him. The man weighed 120 pounds and if not in a speed contest, but in training for one, can sit and eat thirty weighed out pounds of food at a sitting! Thirty pounds! That's fourteen kilos and change!

    That's one quarter of his body weight! I'd have to eat fifty-five pounds of food to match that!

    He also claims not to "purge" afterwards.

    But somehow I didn't suspect an obsessive/compulsive issue until the end. His chef played a joke on him for the cameras. Normally when eating "training meals" he finishes with a large, ten pound ball of papaya flavored shaved ice. The ice acting to help prevent inflammation of his stomach. The papaya helping to soothe and aid in digestion.

    Except this time the chef made two ten pound balls of shaved ice. One with papaya, the other with ghost chili oil. The ghost chili ball being presented first, of course.

    As becomes evident over the next ten minutes or so is the young man can't "not finish" a dish he started! The chef himself came out from the back and said that the hot one wasn't meant to be eaten! But the hotdog eater couldn't not finish it, even when presented with the right one! (Which he didn't eat.)

    But he finished the ghost chili ice ball. Down to the liquid in bowl. Crying the whole time. I even felt sorry for the chef. He looked like he felt horrible about it.
    Time wasted having fun is not time wasted - Lennon
    (John, not the other one.)

  2. #3242
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    Why did they release Solo so close to Infinity War? Too close. I have a goal of being able to see a movie a month, but I'm not even close. Maybe next year. Two movies in three or four weeks is too much. I am delaying on Solo.
    Solfe

  3. #3243
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    I'm more like a movie a decade, but am far behind even that modest goal.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  4. #3244
    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    Why did they release Solo so close to Infinity War? Too close. I have a goal of being able to see a movie a month, but I'm not even close. Maybe next year. Two movies in three or four weeks is too much. I am delaying on Solo.
    So are going alone?
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
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  5. #3245
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    And they (usually, apart from novelty items) have a characteristic sound, which indicates to pedestrians and other cyclists "A bike is coming," whereas a shout doesn't send that message nearly as clearly.
    I remember a shared-use walking/cycling track in Anchorage, on which every cyclist who approached us from behind would call, "Passing on the left" or "Passing on the right". I was struck by how consistently this was done, and I think I wondered aloud here if it was just a local custom or something more general. But the first time it happened, I turned around to see what the shout was about, and pretty much stepped into the path of the oncoming bicycle. That wouldn't have happened if a bicycle bell had sounded behind me.

    Grant Hutchison
    Also you can ring the bell often without feeling aggressive. As I approach someone from behind I will ring the bell a few times to give the person plenty of time to react rather than them jumping out their skin as you pass by. I feel shouting out a warning to be rude, as you sound like you are telling the person/s to get out of your way rather than warning them. Using a bell, I feel you are politely asking them to be aware of your approach.

  6. #3246
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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmocrazy View Post
    Also you can ring the bell often without feeling aggressive.
    I think that's they key insight into why some cyclist remove the bell from their new bike - it's unaggressive.
    There's a definite subculture in cycling these days that is brimming over with aggression - in part it's because of the modern trend towards turning simple recreational activities into endurance athletic events; and in part I think it's a reaction against the idiotically aggressive driving that cyclists are sometimes subjected to by other road-users. So a gently tinkling bell completely subverts the Bradley-Wiggins-on-steroids self-image of some cyclists. (Oops, don't mention the steroids.)

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  7. #3247
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I think that's they key insight into why some cyclist remove the bell from their new bike - it's unaggressive.
    There's a definite subculture in cycling these days that is brimming over with aggression - in part it's because of the modern trend towards turning simple recreational activities into endurance athletic events; and in part I think it's a reaction against the idiotically aggressive driving that cyclists are sometimes subjected to by other road-users. So a gently tinkling bell completely subverts the Bradley-Wiggins-on-steroids self-image of some cyclists. (Oops, don't mention the steroids.)

    Grant Hutchison
    Expanding my brief cyclist bell reference, it is relevant i think to the electric vehicle silence issue. And there are more vehicles than cars, scooters, trial bikes, boards, and the numbers can only increase. Plus electric bicycles of course, they are amazing. So the issue of deliberate sounds is up for grabs. Maybe it will take a few legal cases where injury is attributed to silent running vehicles.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  8. #3248
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    Subway isn't the worst food out there. It's not great but it'll do if you just want a sandwich-ish type food. I am not surprised that people eat there, I do on occasion. What I don't get is when I went back to Long Island, one of my favorite delis was gone and in a different location in the parking lot was a Subway. They are not faster, more convenient, or better in any way. How in the world did a NY deli get replaced by a Subway? That's like a Hershey's chocolate shop opening up in Belgium and putting a local shop out of business. It shouldn't happen.

  9. #3249
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    Quote Originally Posted by closetgeek View Post
    That's like a Hershey's chocolate shop opening up in Belgium and putting a local shop out of business. It shouldn't happen.
    Last time I was in Paris I was shocked to see Starbuck's.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  10. #3250
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    Last time I was in Paris I was shocked to see Starbuck's.
    That's probably an abomination but I wouldn't know. Around here, all the coffee shops sell coffee that is so weak, it might as well be Lipton tea.

  11. #3251
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    Last time I was in Paris I was shocked to see Starbuck's.
    Yes, but what did you see that belonged to the old whaler that was so shocking? ;-)

  12. #3252
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    Stuff you just don't get.

    Hoagie Haven, long a fixture in Princeton, NJ, drove two Subway franchises out of business.

    Take that, factory food!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  13. #3253
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    Hoagie Haven, long a fixture in Princeton, NJ, drove two Subway franchises out of business.

    Take that, factory food!


    We have a very local chain called Cosmic Dave's that is many times better than Subway. I haven't been in a Subway for years.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  14. #3254
    Around here it was the sandwich man in Calais, don't know if it is still open or not but there is subway on both sides of border. Around here they use to be called dagwoods. Some of it is tastes change, people don't like hearing tongue bit in the old days nothing went to waste and people made bad cuts tasty. Plus with chains you can go know what are getting pretty much anywhere and know what you are getting.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  15. #3255
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    Around here Subway sandwiches were referred to as "Salads on a bun" due to the amount of foliage most of our local franchises piled on.

    If you wanted a really good sandwich, we were overrun with delis that could make you a better sandwich than Subway could put out. I grew up in an Italian neighborhood. A deli on every corner, and two in the middle.
    Time wasted having fun is not time wasted - Lennon
    (John, not the other one.)

  16. #3256
    I am one that asks for all the veggies on mine.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  17. #3257
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    I actually don't mind Subway but also ensure that every possible salad item is on the roll. And, I get the salami or chicken not the meatballs. My favourites were from the "Italian" run delis that hard fresh crusty rolls and an interesting selection of salami, copa etc.

    But, I have always had a hankering to try a genuine New York pastrami sandwich from somewhere like Katz's Delicatessen. The nearest I have come is eating one at,real name, Kosher Express in Melbourne and unfortunately I was a little underwhelmed. I also tried a Reuben Sandwich in Montreal which was better but I am still hoping for the genuine New York experience.

  18. #3258
    I would like to try New York pastrami as well. Montreal is more known for smoked meats as deli meats.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  19. #3259
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    I used to have some interesting jobs, which you could translate to "thankless and annoying". Now that I have a great job, I am questioning what the heck I was thinking all those years. I just don't get it. Exactly what part of my brain said: "Serving computers is better than serving people?" Computers aren't all that bad, its when you put annoying people in front of them that it becomes tedious.

    I'm not knocking all computer users, 9 times out of 10, I would "fix something" and look around and see a dozen people who never had or created computer problems, ever. I don't understand why there isn't cheaper or more focused computer certification for end users to throw on their resume. That would kind of be helpful.
    Solfe

  20. #3260
    Why it takes 10 days for me get my new glasses, ok a couple of days of transport back and forth. And the fact I went over budget because I got the clip on the sunglasses clip on. But hopefully on Friday I will get them.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  21. #3261
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    The overuse of British accents in American commercial narration:

    Jaguar: Okay, British company
    Infiniti: Come on, they’re Japanese cars
    Viking Cruise Line: Really?



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  22. #3262
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    The overuse of British accents in American commercial narration:

    Jaguar: Okay, British company
    Infiniti: Come on, they’re Japanese cars
    Viking Cruise Line: Really?

    This seems to go through cycles. I remember in the early-to-mid '00s British accents were popular, then they fell away.

    I guess they're used because the accents "make the speaker sound intelligent/classy".
    Calm down, have some dip. - George Carlin

  23. #3263
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    I remember some commercials featuring the voice of Sean Connery. I just kept wishing he get hish teesh fixshed.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  24. #3264
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    Judging by the fact that there is no less than twelve crossed out names in the who's on board list, I have to presume we're being assaulted by spam at the moment.
    Time wasted having fun is not time wasted - Lennon
    (John, not the other one.)

  25. #3265
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I remember some commercials featuring the voice of Sean Connery. I just kept wishing he get hish teesh fixshed.
    That's an apical "s" (you use the tip, rather than the blade, of the tongue to produce the sibilant). Connery seems to have cultivated it, but it was probably a natural part of his accent to begin with.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  26. #3266
    People who come up with ideas that are not based on reality but just based on the arrogant assumption that they can't do any harm or can't be wrong. Then the evidence comes about that they might be wrong but can't admit and come up with some hair brained ideas to back up their ideas and if all else fails threats. It is not the end of the world if you are wrong.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  27. #3267
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    The overuse of British accents in American commercial narration:

    Jaguar: Okay, British company
    Infiniti: Come on, they’re Japanese cars
    Viking Cruise Line: Really?



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    At the American Museum of Natural History, they have a video about their new Titanosaur that has a British narrator, and I thought, "Even one of the most prestigious museums in the US turns to a British narrator to provide gravitas."

  28. #3268
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    Glenn Beck would seem an "America First" guy, but they use a British woman's voice to plug his own special radio network in the radio commercials that I hear occasionally.

  29. #3269
    The reason that someone has gotten under my skin years ago is because he had to ruin the one time I felt comfortable and happy around a woman.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  30. #3270
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Backroad Astronomer View Post
    The reason that someone has gotten under my skin years ago is because he had to ruin the one time I felt comfortable and happy around a woman.
    Well, you're not dead and there's still more of them. Remember, you're not old until the past becomes more important than the future!
    Time wasted having fun is not time wasted - Lennon
    (John, not the other one.)

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