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Thread: Stuff you just don't get.

  1. #2851
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    My sister. Why she apparently thinks I must "do something" about a current medical dilemma our mother is facing (appointments, testing, surgical location sites) when I'm 1250 miles away. Both were supposed to move *here* as permanent residents years ago. That didn't happen. My husband's also refused to relocate. If they're not here and I'm not there...

    Sister sort of resents me for burden of our elderly mother falling on her. I told mother to move here (I'd look after her). Unless my husband should suddenly change his mind (we move) or we get divorced (won't happen), I guess sister is stuck.
    Dip me in ink and toss me to the Poets.

  2. #2852
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    To get from the bedroom to the living room, I go down the hall.
    To get from the living room to the bedroom, I go down the hall.
    Do I live in M.C. Escher's house?
    It's true I don't hear the expression "go up the hall" very often. Very P.G. Wodehousian, that.

  3. #2853
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    (Post inspired because he's on Good Morning America right now.)

    The Seal song "Kiss from a Rose". Covered by darn near everyone. I kept hearing it on the radio and the lyrics seemed to make no sense. So I looked them up. They don't make any sense when you read them, either.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  4. #2854
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    The Seal song "Kiss from a Rose". Covered by darn near everyone. I kept hearing it on the radio and the lyrics seemed to make no sense. So I looked them up. They don't make any sense when you read them, either.
    I think I remember him stating that this was intentional, and that he would refuse to give and/or explain them. He made me LOL when performing this song in the Discovery Shark Week teaser this year, though.
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  5. #2855
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    Quote Originally Posted by slang View Post
    Ah yes, men in tights! Have to stop it every 2 minutes or so to explain to audience and players what just happened. Call it Foot ball but always handle the ball with hands.
    It's been suggested that the name should be changed to "handegg".
    Everything I need to know I learned through Googling.

  6. #2856
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    The game is still played on foot, not on horse (or on hand). And the ball is nothing like an egg; that's rugby you're thinking of.

  7. #2857
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    Lemuel Gulliver might point out there's no end more or less pointy than the other. (In either sport).
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.

  8. #2858
    That I let some people get to me even if I know there a plenty of people who can back me up.
    ...I'm still free, you can't take the sky from me.
    You cannot run away from the truth, the world is not big enough. DI Jack Frost
    Don't Panic THGTTG
    Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds. Einstein
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  9. #2859
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    Quote Originally Posted by Delvo View Post
    The game is still played on foot, not on horse (or on hand). And the ball is nothing like an egg; that's rugby you're thinking of.
    Along with hundreds of other sports (my bold). Does seem rather odd to me that a sport where you predominately carry or throw a ball by hand is called football.

  10. #2860
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    To get from the bedroom to the living room, I go down the hall.
    To get from the living room to the bedroom, I go down the hall.
    Do I live in M.C. Escher's house?
    I go along the hall or through the hall. I don't get "up" and "down" when applied to directions in the horizontal plane.
    And my brother and I have just discovered, to our mutual inconvenience, that we understand opposite things from the phrase "putting the date [of a planned event] back by two days".

    Grant Hutchison

  11. #2861
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    I do find the current media phrase "going forward" when they mean "in the future" rather irritating. But it's just a minor example of corporate speak where human resources have replaced people. I am so glad I left large corporations before all that stuff was invented to waste time and puff up managers. Not long ago I was asked professionally how to respond to a project that required a "blended solution" it was to do with offering language lessons. I have no idea what was meant by that well known large organisation but I generated some equally meaningless phrases to satisfy them. Have to play the game sometimes to extract the money.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  12. #2862
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToSeek View Post
    It's been suggested that the name should be changed to "handegg".
    Have you come across Real Tennis? It's amazing how games survive. Of course foot ball was very descriptive until a pupil at Rugby school just picked it up and ran with the thing. All credit to whoever it was that encouraged the new game instead of whacking the poor boy's behind. Maybe they did both. (I will not bother to check what the internet thinks happened.)
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  13. #2863
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    ... picked it up and ran with the thing. ... whacking the poor boy's behind. Maybe they did both. ...
    You're thinking Australian rules football, where both are done - and encouraged - routinely.
    Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by ignorance or stupidity.
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    You know, the very powerful and the very stupid have one thing in common. They donít alter their views to fit the facts. They alter the facts to fit their views.
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  14. #2864
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I go along the hall or through the hall. I don't get "up" and "down" when applied to directions in the horizontal plane.

    Grant Hutchison
    A term often used for roads also, even when the roads are horizontal. "I live up the road" / "I live down the road" as opposed to "Along the road". Although I guess one might argue that (in the case of some roads) the house numbers may depict which direction is up and down.

  15. #2865
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    I do find the current media phrase "going forward" when they mean "in the future" rather irritating.
    What about time travel? Travel to the past is usually referred to as "going back" in time, and to the future is "going forward".

    Likewise, when we set our clocks for Daylight Savings Time, the change from 2am to 3am is considered "springing ahead" and changing it from 2am to 1am is "falling back."

    But if we reschedule an event from 2am to 3am, we say we've moved the event "back". That terminology would seem to be the outlier.

    To be honest, though, it all seems to make sense to me, but I'm not sure if I can explain it. And it may only seem to make sense because I've been using it that way all my life.

    EDIT: I'm going to give it a try. You're making a trip, and you have three stops scheduled - you will stop at location A, then location B, then location C. So as you move from A to B to C, you are moving forward.

    However, your visit to location B comes before your visit to location C. B comes before C, B precedes C, ergo B is ahead of C, so if the B visit is moved in the direction of the C visit, it is being moved back. If the C visit is moved in the direction of the B visit, it is being moved forward.
    Last edited by SeanF; 2017-Dec-20 at 02:45 PM.
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  16. #2866
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeanF View Post
    What about time travel? Travel to the past is usually referred to as "going back" in time, and to the future is "going forward".

    Likewise, when we set our clocks for Daylight Savings Time, the change from 2am to 3am is considered "springing ahead" and changing it from 2am to 1am is "falling back."

    But if we reschedule an event from 2am to 3am, we say we've moved the event "back". That terminology would seem to be the outlier.

    To be honest, though, it all seems to make sense to me, but I'm not sure if I can explain it. And it may only seem to make sense because I've been using it that way all my life.
    Where I come from we tend to use the phrase "spring forward". But it is a good point and one which most are familiar with. I often get mixed up with the rescheduling terminology and counting direction of numbers. So have to really think about it when someone moves a meeting "back" (as in your example) to a "later" time, yet the time moves forward, or rather the counting. But maybe the clue is in the "later" which indicates the direction to what is truly meant by "back". For me this is method by association rather than a perquisite, since you can count numbers in either direction and argue a valid definition of forwards or backwards for the same direction, e.g -1-2-3... or 1+2+3...

  17. #2867
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    Ooh, are we going to mention the controversy? When you have a meeting set for the 4th, and someone reschedules it for the 5th, did the meeting get moved one day forward? Or was it moved one day back?

  18. #2868
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    You're thinking Australian rules football, where both are done - and encouraged - routinely.
    Nah, profloater was describing the origin myth of "rugby football" ("rugger") during a game of what later became "association football" ("soccer") at the eponymous English public school, some time in the early 19th century. It's likely that Australian-rules football was subsequently codified under the influence of people who had been exposed to rugby football in the UK.

    Grant HUtchison

  19. #2869
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    A supervisor (1 of 3 agencies I'm contracted with) who gets all "I'll assign that doctor to someone else!" if you didn't know to do this or that ... because she only NOW informed you while making the threat.
    Dip me in ink and toss me to the Poets.

  20. #2870
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    ...we understand opposite things from the phrase "putting the date [of a planned event] back by two days".
    We push dates out(later), or pull them in(sooner).

    We do, however, walk down the hallway.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  21. #2871
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Nah, profloater was describing the origin myth of "rugby football" ("rugger") during a game of what later became "association football" ("soccer") at the eponymous English public school, some time in the early 19th century. It's likely that Australian-rules football was subsequently codified under the influence of people who had been exposed to rugby football in the UK.

    Grant HUtchison
    Uh, yeah, I know. I was making a joke.

    (I actually "taught" the rugger-soccer thing when I was a referee instructor, to explain why we call it soccer. As well as how we got the title referee, accent on the middle syllable.)
    Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by ignorance or stupidity.
    Isaac Asimov

    You know, the very powerful and the very stupid have one thing in common. They donít alter their views to fit the facts. They alter the facts to fit their views.
    Doctor Who

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  22. #2872
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeanF View Post
    What about ...(snip)

    EDIT: I'm going to give it a try....(snip)

    However, your visit to location B comes before your visit to location C. B comes before C, B precedes C, ergo B is ahead of C, so if the B visit is moved in the direction of the C visit, it is being moved back. If the C visit is moved in the direction of the B visit, it is being moved forward.
    But I am in a driving test executing a three point turn ABC, A to B is backwards while B to C is forwards and ends up behind A. C comes after B and B is after A but if B is moved forward toward A, A to B will have to happen again before B to C. If B is moved backward toward C you may hit D and wish you were back at A.
    Last edited by profloater; 2017-Dec-20 at 04:43 PM. Reason: snip failure
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  23. #2873
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    But I am in a driving test executing a three point turn ABC, A to B is backwards while B to C is forwards and ends up behind A. C comes after B and B is after A but if B is moved forward toward A, A to B will have to happen again before B to C. If B is moved backward toward C you may hit D and wish you were back at A.
    That's why time travel is so problematic.
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  24. #2874
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    Uh, yeah, I know. I was making a joke.
    Oops. Went right by me. Sorry.

    Grant Hutchison

  25. #2875
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    Side point on the rugby thing - originally, getting the ball over the line (by carrying) didn't have points, it only allowed the chance (a try) to kick the ball at the goal (now posts). So the points were still based on the foot. (Later, people figured the getting the ball over the line bit was actually the exciting bit, so that got points (and called a "try"), and is worth more than the kick, now called a conversion).

    Accuracy not fully guaranteed.
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.

  26. #2876
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    I have no idea what was meant by that well known large organisation but I generated some equally meaningless phrases to satisfy them. Have to play the game sometimes to extract the money.
    A place I've applied at several times over the years has applicants take a huge test of multiple-choice questions to try to determine what kind of attitude/personality the applicant has. The questions fall into a few general themes, and in some cases the kinds of answers they want are obvious. For example, there are some questions about how we feel about working in groups/teams; obviously no company wants to hire somebody who hates having co-workers. And there are a few about whether people who work together should have "similar backgrounds" (a phrase which all by itself is already a warning flag labeling whoever uses it as a bigot) or should be "diverse"; obviously they only want to hire people who favor the latter. And there's another group of questions about whether you prefer to live a relaxed low-stress lifestyle without an excessive workload or are highly energetic and always looking for more ways to stay busy; obviously there's no such thing as an employer that isn't looking for the latter because every employer likes to think of itself as the most dynamic, "fast-paced" workplace ever and wants hard workers, not lazy ones.

    But then there are the ones about multi-tasking. Actually, they usually phrased it as something about "doing several things at once" versus "doing one thing at a time", so I'm not sure whether the label "multi-tasking" was used. Either way, though, I couldn't tell which way they were going with this theme of questions. It would be consistent with the corporate "fast-paced" ideal to want multi-taskers, but isn't the fact that all the research on it shows that there's no such thing, and that people who pride themselves on doing it are actually the least efficient at organizing and prioritizing tasks, sufficiently well-known these days that employers would have started trying to filter the opposite way now, to avoid the fakers?... especially when the employer is a hospital (where you'd expect them to know a bit more about how humans function and follow science a bit more closely than the average electronics retailer)? Or is this particular corporate myth just too stubborn and too deeply embedded in corporate culture, including at medical companies because the owners & boards & such there aren't in the medical business themselves?

  27. #2877
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    Years ago (mid 1980s) I got hired for a computer programming job by someone who declared “You gave a good answer here: Most people go on and on about teamwork and getting along. Now, I know that programmers are all eccentric. We need people who can get ideas and put them to work, and you have to do a lot of that alone.” Not sure exactly how I did answer that, but her attitude made sense to me. I did most of my work alone (after researching the problem, and before working with the users of course) and it went well. (I was doing meteorological stuff in Fortran and producing tools they could use on a daily basis, whereas our Cobol programmers were still composing their Data Dictionaries.)

    Nowadays, I’d have to spend most of my time in meetings, and trying hard to write program code that looked and worked exactly like everybody else’s. I suspect it’d be less efficient.

    So, I’d say give an honest answer and take your chances.

  28. #2878
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    Six foot tall teddy bears on sale at the supermarket for $80.

    The only reason I can see for those existing is to give grandparents a way to get back at their kids by giving them to the grandchildren.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  29. #2879
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Six foot tall teddy bears on sale at the supermarket for $80.

    The only reason I can see for those existing is to give grandparents a way to get back at their kids by giving them to the grandchildren.
    Worked for me, albeit with a great nephew.
    That was generational continuity, to some extent, since I gave my nephew, the father of the great nephew, a drum when he was four years old. I received a phone call from by brother on Christmas Day, with inept drumming in the background. My brother said only one word to me, which I cannot repeat here, and which seemed implausible in view of our shared parentage, and then he hung up.
    Job done.

    Grant Hutchison

  30. #2880
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Worked for me, albeit with a great nephew.
    That was generational continuity, to some extent, since I gave my nephew, the father of the great nephew, a drum when he was four years old. I received a phone call from by brother on Christmas Day, with inept drumming in the background. My brother said only one word to me, which I cannot repeat here, and which seemed implausible in view of our shared parentage, and then he hung up.
    Job done.

    Grant Hutchison
    You gave your nephew a drum when he was four and it somehow affected the great-nephew?

    Never mind, it's been a long day and I'm tired. And "nephew" is a really funny-looking word.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

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