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Thread: Will space debris make space exploration impossible

  1. #181
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    The UN has agreed on some guidelines which if adopted by space faring countries would help in minimising the space debris problems.

    http://spacenews.com/un-committee-ap...ty-guidelines/

    A United Nations committee reached agreement last week on nine guidelines intended to reduce the risk of collisions in space and other harmful space activities.

    The non-binding guidelines, approved by a working group of the Scientific and Technical Subcommittee of the UN’s Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS), are intended to improve the long-term sustainability of space. They join 12 other guidelines on the topic approved by the committee in 2016.

    Speaking at the Canadian SmallSat Symposium here Feb. 13, David Kendall, chairman of COPUOS, said the guidelines came out of a long-running effort by the committee to establish guidelines that, while themselves carrying no legal force, can be incorporated into national laws and regulations.

    “The guidelines discussed by the working group recognize the fragility of the space environment and the current and future threats that need to be addressed if we are to ensure that space can be effectively used in the future,” he said.

  2. #182
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    Yet another idea to capture large debris - a space harpoon.

    https://www.popularmechanics.com/spa...up-space-junk/

    Space junk is a huge problem. In fact, if we don't do something about the more than 20,000 objects—from defunct satellites to paint chips—that are orbiting Earth, we may one day be unable to leave the planet at all.

    Luckily, scientists are on the case. In the UK, a team at Airbus is developing a charmingly lo-fi method of removing large pieces of junk from orbit: a giant harpoon. The harpoon, which is about a meter long, would be attached via a strong tether to a spacecraft which would follow it as it punctured space trash. The spacecraft would then tow the junk back down to Earth, where it would burn up in the atmosphere.

    To test their invention, the researchers have been shooting their harpoon in the lab, using compressed air, at sheets of metal that are 3 cm thick aluminum composite honeycomb panels.

  3. #183
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    Yet another idea to capture large debris - a space harpoon.

    https://www.popularmechanics.com/spa...up-space-junk/
    I herd about this a number of years ago now that it would be a problem before now....after never having herd about it again I assumed all the junk was probly there but eventually should be getting cleaned up by earth gravity pulling it in or letting it go and it just heading out to space.

    Sent from my SM-N920W8 using Tapatalk

  4. 2018-Mar-19, 11:44 PM
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  5. #184
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    Another experiment to remove space debris to take place soon.

    https://www.popularmechanics.com/spa...up-space-junk/

    On the whole, space is mostly empty, but the space around the Earth is anything but. Earth’s orbit is full of thousands of satellites, pieces of debris, and junk from the thousands of rocket launches over the past few decades. This presents a serious problem for future satellites: Any one of them could be randomly taken out by a flying piece of space junk.

    The only way to solve this problem is to clean up space, but that’s easier said than done. Plenty of organizations, including NASA and the Chinese and Japanese space agencies, have developed their own prototype space debris catchers. On Monday, one such debris catcher, named RemoveDEBRIS, was launched into space and will undergo testing over the next few weeks.

  6. #185
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    Maybe this idea of "space sustainably for future generations" is the way to go.

    https://www.smithsonianmag.com/scien...ace-180969212/

    The Outer Space Treaty—written in 1967 and signed by all the major world powers—is the closest thing we have to a constitution for space. For a document conceived before the moon landing, it’s remarkably forward-looking: it declares “celestial bodies” like the moon and asteroids off-limits for private development and requires countries authorize and continually supervise companies’ activities in space. It also says that space exploration should be carried out for the benefit of all peoples, and it explicitly prohibits weapons of mass destruction in space.

    But even with that impressive scope of vision, the treaty’s authors could never have imagined where we’d be now. Currently there are 1,738 man-made satellites in orbit around our planet. As they become more affordable to build and launch—think of them as the drones of low Earth orbit—they’ll no doubt proliferate and vie for valuable real estate there with space stations, space tourists, space colonists, space miners, military spacecraft, and thousands of derelict satellites and other immobile debris.

    So far no one has any idea how to deal with the scientific and engineering challenges—let alone the political, legal, and business ones—involved in sustainably managing orbital debris and mining celestial objects. “There needs to be a path moving forward with economic and science opportunities, but doing it in a way that mitigates damage as much as possible and hopefully with no conflicts,” says Aaron Boley, a planetary physicist at the University of British Columbia.

    That’s why he and at least six other space scientists, policy experts, and legal scholars from Canada, the U.S., the UK, and China are putting together the world’s first Institute for the Sustainable Development of Space—essentially a space-focused think tank. The collaboration of experts from science, policy, and industry sectors aim to find long-term solutions so that future generations of space explorers can continue where today’s leaves off. Building on the original principles of the Outer Space Treaty, applying those same themes of international governance to a new space age.

  7. #186
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    Another experiment to remove space debris to take place soon.

    https://www.popularmechanics.com/spa...up-space-junk/
    The testing is about to begin

    https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2018...l-test-begins/

    The RemoveDEBRIS satellite was deployed from the International Space Station (ISS) on Wednesday, marking the business end of the mission that will test – for the first time – new technology aimed at capturing and deorbiting space junk.
    The satellite rode to the ISS in the CRS-14 Dragon, following its launch via a Falcon 9 back in April.

    Built by Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL), the spacecraft is based around the SSTL-42 satellite bus. The mission, which has received funding from the European Union, will see the satellite demonstrate techniques for capturing and deorbiting debris from low Earth orbit.

  8. 2018-Jun-22, 05:16 PM
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  9. #187
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    From the article
    European aerospace giant Airbus designed and built three of the four planned experiments aboard the spacecraft. The debris-catching net experiment, developed at Airbus' site in Bremen, Germany, will be conducted in October, the company said in a statement.
    Those test will be interesting indeed.

  10. #188
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    After the 1st Chinese space station entered earth after an uncontrollable entry we have another man made object coming down to earth. Unlike the Chinese SS which mostly disintegrated, this one is likely to come down in one piece. Why, because the Russians designed it to enter the Venus atmosphere and land in one piece!!!

    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/As...Earth_999.html

    A station was unsuccessfully launched as a part of the USSR's space exploration program and has been orbiting the Earth ever since, but the station's deterioration is bringing its "homecoming" closer with each passing year.

    The Kosmos 482 interplanetary station, which was unsuccessfully sent towards Venus in 1972 by the USSR, may crash land on Earth between 2023 and 2025, astronomer and cosmonautics historian Pavel Shubin told Sputnik. He couldn't pinpoint the exact location of the future crash site, but noted that it would be between 52 degrees north and 52 degree south latitude.

    The astronomer has studied the data on Kosmos 482 orbit as well as its deterioration and detected that it started to degrade faster due to it getting closer to Earth and experiencing increased gravitational pull.

  11. #189
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    "When debris overwhelms space"

    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Wh...space_999.html

    We see more and more reports of debris concern among satellite operators and space observers. Add to this the many recent announcements of multiple broadband satellite constellations that are being funded and developed for launch in the next few years. Just focusing on low Earth orbits (LEO), there are an estimated 10,000 satellites in the works.

    SpaceX alone plans on launching over 4,000 of these multi-hundred-kilogram spacecraft that are now being built in Redmond, Washington. Add all of the broadband satellites to the hundreds of planned CubeSats and we have a new satellite population that is at least an order of magnitude larger than what is now in LEO. This explosion in population will be accompanied by an explosion in LEO debris. The implications are extremely serious.
    I am because we are
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  12. #190
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    Which country has the most amount of space debris?

    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Th...Space_999.html

    Considering many people haven't visited Space and it is pretty much untouched, there are many satellites, debris and parts of rocket that orbit our Earth.

    But who does this Space junk actually belong to?

    Well, data from Space Track has allowed RS Components to analyse just how many bits of debris are currently orbiting Earth and which country they belong to.

    In total, there are over 12,000 items in orbit - this just includes items created by humans. Initially, space debris was referred to as the natural debris found in the solar system such as comets, asteroids and fragments off meteoroids. But since Space shuttles are becoming more of a regular occurrence in Space now, the most notable pieces of debris are now from satellites.

    The US has the most amount of debris in Space, with over 4,000 (4,037) items, closely followed by the Russian Commonwealth with 4,035 pieces orbiting.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

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