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Thread: Overview of India's space program

  1. #31
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    This certainly gives ISRO a boost to its commercial satellite launch ambitions. They will launch a 120-kg satellite for a US company. No ordinary US company either. It is Skybox Imaging. The company had last year been brought by Google.

    http://www.hindustantimes.com/india-...1-1315207.aspx

    Space collaborations between India and US are taking on a new shape. While there is already a joint working group of Nasa and Isro on Mars, the space agency is now preparing itself to launch the first satellite of a US based company from Sriharikota in Andhra Pradesh.

    Skybox Imaging is a Silicon Valley based private company providing commercial high-resolution satellite imagery, high-definition video and analytics services. The company had last year been brought by Google. Sky Box had entered into an agreement with Antrix Corporation, the commercial arm of Isro to launch the 120-kg satellite

  2. #32
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    India now plans to increase the number of satellites it launches per year from 4 or 5 to 10.

    http://www.deccanherald.com/content/...abilities.html

    The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) has ambitious plans to increase its satellite launching capabilities from the current year, said S K Shivakumar, Director, ISRO Satellite Centre (ISAC), Bengaluru, here on Friday.

    He was delivering the national science day lecture on ‘Indian Satellites and Success of Mars Orbiter Mission’, at All India Institute of Speech and Hearing.

    He said that the objective of increasing the number of satellite launches was to expand the space programme taken up by ISRO. Earlier, ISRO used to launch four to five satellites every year. From the current year, the space agency will launch ten satellites into orbit every year, he said.

    “The idea to increase the number of launches is a big challenge. In order to facilitate the same, required infrastructure is being created at ISAC in Bengaluru,” he said.

  3. #33
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    The Nasa-Isro Synthetic Aperture Radar (Nisar), being jointly planned by Isro and US' Nasa has cleared critical reviews and entered the last phase of pre-project assessment.

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/i...w/46434123.cms

    The two leading space agencies are co-developing a dual frequency synthetic aperture radar that will use advanced imaging capable of providing an unprecedented, detailed view of the earth.

    In a first of its kind endeavour, Nisar will be able to operate in two frequencies, both in bands lower than KU-Band or AA-Band. While Isro will develop and provide the S-band radar, expected to have a 12-cm wavelength, Nasa will supply the 24-cm wavelength L-band radar. TOI had first broken the story in November 2013.

    "Being designed to observe and take measurements of some of Earth's most complex processes, including ecosystem disturbances, ice-sheet collapse, and natural hazards such as earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanoes and landslides, Nisar completed its System Requirements Review/Mission Definition Review (SRR/MDR) in the end of December," a senior Isro official said.

    He said that the review was held at Nasa's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in California and Isro's scientists participated via teleconferencing.

  4. #34
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    India is planning to build a third launch pad at the Satish Dhawan Space Centre in Sriharikota, Andhra Pradesh

    http://www.livemint.com/Politics/VBo...ng-number.html

    The additional launch pad is intended to support increased launch frequency, landing requirements of future advanced launch vehicles and also to serve as a redundant launch pad for Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV) Mark III class of vehicles.

    While 27 Indian satellites are operational currently, there are 25 indigenous satellites under development including six GSATs, 13 observation satellites, three navigational satellites, and three space satellites—Aditya, the sun satellite; Astrostat, the astronomical satellite; and Chandrayaan-2, the moon satellite.

  5. #35
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    The third launch pad might take minimum of another 5 years before it is operational. I certainly hope this is not the case. With the call for more launches for both Indian needs and the commercial front, the existing 2 launch pads will not be able to cope.

    http://www.daijiworld.com/news/news_...sp?n_id=305122

    According to Prasad, a report on the third launch pad has been prepared by a study team with officials drawn from all the ISRO centres.

    The report has to be studied and a proposal for the third launch pad has to be submitted to the central government for funds.

    Prasad said it would take around five years for the launch pad to come into service from the date of project approval and sanction of funds.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    India is planning to build a third launch pad at the Satish Dhawan Space Centre in Sriharikota, Andhra Pradesh
    In researching your next post, I found this.
    They've been sounding that alarm for 4 years now.


    But; what I was looking for (and found in the article)...
    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    With the call for more launches for both Indian needs and the commercial front, the existing 2 launch pads will not be able to cope.
    ...turns out to be true.
    Earlier, you posted an article with the hope for 10 launches per year. This article mentions that a launch takes up 60 days of pad time. That's 6 launches per pad per year. Throw in a few delays, and you just hit the limit.

    It's going to put their human spaceflight back 3 years also. The last I saw was their hope for putting someone up there in 2017. Without this new pad and it's human flight capabilities, they are going to have to wait.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by NEOWatcher View Post
    In researching your next post, [url=http://spacenews.com/isro-chief-we-need-more-launch-pads-business-standard/]But; what I was looking for (and found in the article)...

    ...turns out to be true.
    Earlier, you posted an article with the hope for 10 launches per year. This article mentions that a launch takes up 60 days of pad time. That's 6 launches per pad per year. Throw in a few delays, and you just hit the limit.

    It's going to put their human spaceflight back 3 years also. The last I saw was their hope for putting someone up there in 2017. Without this new pad and it's human flight capabilities, they are going to have to wait.
    The human spaceflight needs the GSLV MKIII. With the 1st flight now only in December 2016. With the requirement to have flown the GSLV MKIII at least 3 to 5 times before it is used for human spaceflight, then yes, human spaceflight is at the earliest 2020. Hopefully they would have their 3ed launchpad ready by then otherwise there will another delay.

  8. #38
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    After being delayed earlier this month, India's 4th Regional Positioning System satellite is now planned to launch on the 28th of March.

    One interesting titbit from the news was - Each satellite costs around Rs.150 crore and the PSLV-XL version rocket costs around Rs.130 crore. We now have a base line to compare India's launch cost with other countries/companies (there was someone looking for that info in another thread in the exploration forum)

    http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/...w/46661443.cms

    The Indian rocket that would put into orbit the country's fourth navigation satellite on March 28 was moved to the launch pad on Monday morning, said a senior official.

    "The rocket - Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle-PSLV-XL - has been moved to the launch pad or the umbilical tower. The rocket will be fixed to the umbilical tower," M.Y.S. Prasad, director, Satish Dhawan Space Centre (SDSC), told IANS over phone from Sriharikota.
    Last edited by selvaarchi; 2015-Mar-24 at 10:19 AM.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    One interesting titbit from the news was - Each satellite costs around Rs.150 crore and the PSLV-XL version rocket costs around Rs.130 crore. We now have a base line to compare India's launch cost with other countries/companies (there was someone looking for that info in another thread in the exploration forum)
    That's always a hard one to get a clear number on. Sometimes the support costs are in there which could double the costs, and sometimes we don't know if there are any government incentives.
    But; I did some searching and came up with some rough numbers.
    PSLV-XL (india) $20.85M/3250kg = $6415/kg
    Vega(Europe) $27m/2500 = $10800/kg
    Delta II (USA) $51M/6100kg = $8360/kg
    DNEPR (Ukraine) $45M/4500 = $10000/kg
    Last edited by NEOWatcher; 2015-Mar-24 at 02:37 PM. Reason: format

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by NEOWatcher View Post
    That's always a hard one to get a clear number on. Sometimes the support costs are in there which could double the costs, and sometimes we don't know if there are any government incentives.
    But; I did some searching and came up with some rough numbers.
    PSLV-XL (india) $20.85M/3250kg = $6415/kgVega(Europe) $27m/2500 = $10800/kg
    Delta II (USA) $51M/6100kg = $8360/kg
    DNEPR (Ukraine) $45M/4500 = $10000/kg
    Thanks, NEOWatcher. I expect India's cost for a PSLV-XL will be somewhat higher for a commercial customer.

  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    I expect India's cost for a PSLV-XL will be somewhat higher for a commercial customer.
    Yes; that's hard to predict at this moment.
    I also wanted to compare with a Chinese vehicle, but I couldn't find costs. And; for reasons not to be discussed here, I would find the numbers questionable.

  12. #42
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    ISRO has been awarded the prestigious Gandhi Peace Prize for the year 2014.

    http://www.newindianexpress.com/nati...cle2733730.ece

    The jury comprising Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Chief Justice of India Justice H.L Dattu, Mallikarjun Kharge, Leader of the single largest opposition party in Lok Sabha, L.K. Advani, and Gopalkrishna Gandhi met here to decide the award.

    “The ISRO has upheld its mission of bringing space to the service of the common man and in the service of the nation. In the process it has become one of the six largest space agencies of the world,” the official statement said.

  13. #43
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    The space review has an article this week on why India needs its own Regional Navigation Satellite System.

    http://www.thespacereview.com/article/2719/1

    [QUOTE] All this clearly indicates that those states that have a reasonable capability in space arena are in the process of developing their own navigation systems. There are significant utilities for such systems for civilian applications, and the commercial benefits of such constellations are well-known. However, the strategic reasons for developing such systems are equally important. GPS is essentially a military system that was made available for civilian use after a Korean airliner was shot down by Soviet interceptors in 1983 because of an airspace violation, killing 269 passengers. After this, then US President Ronald Reagan made the GPS available globally to avoid future navigational problems.

    The GPS signals made available globally are intentionally degraded signals so as to avoid any military-specific utility. The US has the capability to block the civilian signals while still being able to use the military signal (M-band). Hence, there exists a possibility that the US could deny others access to GPS during political disagreements. Also, owing to topography and terrain features there could some blind spots for these signals. States like Japan face problems from high-rise buildings and indoor locations that block or degrade signals.

    Today, navigation systems are the heart of aviation and shipping, be it civil or military. The 1991 Gulf War significantly demonstrated the utility of navigational systems for militaries. All modern-day weaponry and weapon delivery platforms are dependent on navigational systems. The threat perceptions of countries like India and Japan are well-known. Owing to North Korean challenges, Japan has already invested in spy satellites and their focus towards developing an independent regional navigational system is understandable. [QUOTE]

  14. #44
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    India's commercial wing Antrix, is certainly making hay while India is basking in the limelight of MOM.

    http://www.hindustantimes.com/india-...1-1338746.aspx

    While the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) has put the country in global limelight because of its low-cost mission to Mars, its commercial wing, Antrix, has started witnessing a robust growth with more countries approaching it with offers to launch their satellites.

    One such proposal of commercial satellite launch is due for June this year in which three DMC-3 earth observation satellites along with one micro and one nano satellite built by UK's Surrey Satellite Technology (SSTL) will be launched into space.

    The mission is designated as PSLV- C28/ DMC-3 which has been taken under a commercial agreement between Antrix Corporation Limited and DMC International Imaging (DMCII), a wholly-owned subsidiary of SSTL.

    Noteworthy, Antrix entered into a launch services agreement with a company from US in 2014 for launching their earth observation micro satellite.

    This is the first time when Antrix will be launching a US-built satellite on-board PSLV.

    Recently, Antrix also entered into a launch services agreement with another company from US for launching seven nano satellites of US on-board PSLV.

  15. #45
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    40 years ago on April 19 1975 India joined the space club by by launching their first-ever satellite, the Aryabhata. Here is some interesting information on it.

    http://www.mid-day.com/articles/10-i...bhata/16145189

    >> The Aryabhata was named after the 5th century astronomer and mathematician of the same name.

    >> Built by the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) to gain experience in building and operating a satellite in space, it was actually launched by the Soviet Union.

  16. #46
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    ISRO ladies make it to the cover of this week's NATURE magazine.

    https://twitter.com/nature/status/598838477837467648

  17. #47
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    That's it? You find an interesting picture and post it without explanation?

    There's a whole big story about this with links to the various sections. Space is mentioned, but is only a small part of what this issue is talking about.

  18. #48
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    LOL...I enjoyed the photo. In many ways, surprisingly informative about the space industry in India. Regardless, there are many inane posts that are of human interest as this one but selvaarchi is not allowed.

    I'm not sure but maybe the hall monitoring should be left to the mods.

  19. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by NEOWatcher View Post
    That's it? You find an interesting picture and post it without explanation?

    There's a whole big story about this with links to the various sections. Space is mentioned, but is only a small part of what this issue is talking about.
    As you put it, the articles do not have much to say about the Indian space industry. My intention of putting the picture up, was to highlight that an international magazine recognize the contributions of the ISRO ladies by having them on their cover page. I recognized the picture from either the MOM launch or when it went into orbit around Mars.

  20. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    As you put it, the articles do not have much to say about the Indian space industry. My intention of putting the picture up, was to highlight that an international magazine recognize the contributions of the ISRO ladies by having them on their cover page. I recognized the picture from either the MOM launch or when it went into orbit around Mars.
    Thanks for the explanation. I went through the ancillary links and couldn't figure out what that picture was (or who)
    On the same line of thought, they did have quite a few other ladies of science highlighted.

  21. #51
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    India signs another space agreement with China to cooperate on remote sensing missions, space based meteorology, lunar and deep space exploration, and piggy back launching. Disappointed there is no mention of the space station.

    http://articles.economictimes.indiat...o-sciences-mou

    India and China today agreed to step up their cooperation in science and technology, including space exploration, geo sciences and collaborate for research in earthquake sciences.

    The two countries have signed an agreement space cooperation outline 2015-2020 during the current visit of Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

    The theme selected for cooperation included remote sensing missions, space based meteorology, lunar and deep space exploration, piggy back launching, satellite navigation, education and training.

  22. #52
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    The Indian government has approved Rs 3,090 crore (that covers the cost of 15 PSLVs, programme elements, programme management and 'launch campaign') for continuation of the workhorse Polar Satellite Vehicle programme for another 15 flights in a four-year period. This is for the period April 2017 to March 2020.

    This works out at Rs 200 crore per PSLV. That is about 50% more then what I had in post #38 of this thread.

    http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/...w/47375622.cms

    The total fund requirement has been pegged at Rs 3,090 crore and includes the cost of 15 PSLVs, programme elements, programme management and 'launch campaign'.

    The PSLV continuation programme will meet the demand for the launch of satellites at a frequency of four to five launches per year, with a greater focus on enhancing the level of participation by the Indian industry.

    "All the 15 operational flights would be completed during the period 2017-2020," the statement said.

  23. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    This works out at Rs 200 crore per PSLV. That is about 50% more then what I had in post #38 of this thread.
    And to about $13000/kg making it the most expensive of the corresponding rockets I mentioned in #39.
    It also reduces it back to the 4-5 flights per year from their projection of 10 (post #32)

    But; maintaining domestic capabilities is important to any country.

  24. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by NEOWatcher View Post
    And to about $13000/kg making it the most expensive of the corresponding rockets I mentioned in #39.
    It also reduces it back to the 4-5 flights per year from their projection of 10 (post #32)

    But; maintaining domestic capabilities is important to any country.
    Flights could be more then that as the number is only for PSLVs. There is one GSLV MKII in the middle of this year. Add another one for their 1st test of reusable rocket. Next year they should have at least one GSLV MKII and one GSLV MKIII.

    How do you get the cost so high? By your figures it should go up by about 50% (Rs.130 crore to Rs 200 crore) - $6415/kg to $9622.5/kg

  25. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    Flights could be more then that as the number is only for PSLVs. There is one GSLV MKII in the middle of this year. Add another one for their 1st test of reusable rocket. Next year they should have at least one GSLV MKII and one GSLV MKIII.
    True, they didn't specify vehicles in the earlier article. They really will have to ramp up GSLV quite a bit though. But; I'm not discounting that if they are going to keep moving forward on their other plans.

    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    How do you get the cost so high? By your figures it should go up by about 50% (Rs.130 crore to Rs 200 crore) - $6415/kg to $9622.5/kg
    I went back and checked a few sites for conversion, and apparenltly the one I used was outdated at $214431.36 per crore.
    Finding some others, I come up with a much closer figure to yours (9970).

    Still pulls it out of any savings compared to others in the weight class, but like I said, It's domestic capability.

  26. #56
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    Glad to read that ISRO is working hard to get its regional GPS up and running. In the process they have also included a few other enhancements. Like the GPS Aided Geo Augmented Navigation-GAGAN project as a Satellite Based Augmentation System (SBAS) for the Indian Airspace.

    http://www.isro.gov.in/applications/...ia-gagan-irnss

    The objective of GAGAN to establish, deploy and certify satellite based augmentation system for safety-of-life civil aviation applications in India has been successfully completed. The system is inter-operable with other international SBAS systems like US-WAAS, European EGNOS, and Japanese MSAS etc. GAGAN GEO footprint extends from Africa to Australia and has expansion capability for seamless navigation services across the region. GAGAN provides the additional accuracy, availability, and integrity necessary for all phases of flight, from enroute through approach for all qualified airports within the GAGAN service volume. GAGAN Payload is already operational through GSAT-8 and GSAT-10 satellites. The third GAGAN payload will be carried onboard GSAT-15 satellite which is scheduled for launch this year.

    Initially, Director General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) certified GAGAN for enroute operations (RNP 0.1) on December 30, 2013 and subsequently on April 21, 2015 for precision approach services (APV 1). APV1 Certified GAGAN signals are being broadcast with effect from May 19, 2015. GAGAN is the first SBAS system in the world to serve the equatorial region. GAGAN ionospheric algorithm known as ISRO GIVE Model-Multi-Layer Data Fusion (IGM-MLDF) was developed by ISRO and is operational in the implemented GAGAN System. India has become the third country in the world to have such precision approach capabilities.

    GAGAN though primarily meant for aviation, will provide benefits beyond aviation to many other user segments such as intelligent transportation, maritime, highways, railways, surveying, geodesy, security agencies, telecom industry, personal users of position location applications etc.

  27. #57
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    India to launch is developing a new, miniature weather-forecasting satellite, ScatSat, to replace OCEANSAT-2 at the end of this year. OCEANSAT-2 has become dysfunctional since February 2014.

    http://indianexpress.com/article/tec...ellite-at-sac/

    “The scatterometer on OCEANSAT-2 that had provided accurate data about the landfall of Phailin cyclone has become dysfunctional since February 2014. We are now rapidly building a new scatterometer that will be able to predict cyclogenesis or the formation and strengthening of possible cyclones. This can be done by keeping a watch on the formation of the vortex of air over oceans,” said Tapan Misra, director, SAC.

    The scatterometer on OCEANSAT-2 was launched in 2009 and became dysfunctional in about four-and-a-half years. Currently, India is depending on the NASA’s ISS-RapidScat to monitor ocean winds and cyclones.

  28. #58
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    It could well be a bumper year for launches for India. They might launch a total of 5 0r 6 rockets.

    http://www.newindianexpress.com/stat...cle2839810.ece

    The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) has six major missions lined up for the rest of 2015, including the keenly awaited Reusable Launch Vehicle-Technology Demonstrator (RLV-TD) mission toward the middle of the year.

    First comes the PSLV C-28 mission bearing three UK satellites. The launch date has been fixed tentatively for July 10.

    The RLV-TD mission, the first flight test of an unmanned, scale model of India’s own space shuttle, is second in the list. It will lift off from Sriharikota by the end of July or the beginning of August, M Chandradathan, who stepped down as director, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre (VSSC), Thumba, told reporters here on Friday.
    This mission will be followed by the GSLV D-6 mission, which will be a ditto version of the GSLV D-5 which successfully flight-tested the India-built cryogenic engine in December 2014.

    “This mission will be in August and will validate the cryo stage. The cryo stage is being integrated at the IPRC, Mahendragiri,” S Somanath, the new director of LPSC, said. The remaining two missions are PSLV-based, intended to put two more satellites in the Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System (IRNSS) in orbit.

    “The PSLV C-29 and the PSLV C-31 will carry one IRNSS satellite each, hopefully by the end of 2015. We hope to have two of the three remaining IRNSS satellites in orbit this year,” he said.

  29. #59
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    ISRO is extending a helping hand to Indian companies to get more involved in their space programme.

    http://odishasamaya.com/news/isro-pl...-venture/43537

    The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) is planning to magnify its Industrial partners’ role by starting joint venture with them.

    ISRO is planning to do this to ready them to do entire tasks like satellite launches.

    The ISRO Chairman AS Kiran Kumar has informed about the plan, saying it will play a key role for their industrial partners.

    The agency has sounded out its commercial arm, Antrix Corporation, to explore such opportunities for specific projects. Internal teams are being formed to draft a plan, he told The Hindu in a recent interview.

  30. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    ISRO is extending a helping hand to Indian companies to get more involved in their space programme.
    http://odishasamaya.com/news/isro-pl...-venture/43537
    So they waited for other countries to be used as guinea pigs before using Antrix themselves?

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