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Thread: India's new launch vehicles GSLV Series

  1. #151
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    The GSLV MKIII put the satellite it was carrying into an off target insertion orbit. But the satellite managed to correct itself.

    There is a silver lining in that, as the error was due the cryogenic engine giving a higher trust than the theoretical calculations.

    http://spaceflight101.com/indias-gsa...get-injection/

    "Per the original flight plan, the C25 cryo stage was planned to fire for ten minutes and 43 seconds to accelerate the stack by 5.8 Kilometers per second to reach the planned injection speed of 9.8 km/s. However, Launch Control displays showed a not insignificant overperformance, meaning the stage was accelerating faster than predicted through mission simulations.

    This in itself is not uncommon especially for a completely new rocket stage for which only theoretical performance models exit."

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  2. #152
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    ISRO hopes to test it's semi-cryogenic engine by 2021.

    It will replace the 2nd stage of the GSLV MKIII. If successful it will increase the rocket capability from 4 tons to 6 tons to GTO.

    http://www.newindianexpress.com/nati...1-1615979.html

    "With the success of the Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mk-III (GSLV Mk-III), ISRO’s Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre (LPSC) here at Valiyamala is now focusing on the next level - the development of the much-delayed semi-cryogenic technology.

    Unlike the cryogenic engine which uses a combination of liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LOX) as propellant, the semi-cryogenic engine replaces liquid hydrogen with refined kerosene (Isrosene as ISRO calls it). LOX will be retained as oxidiser."

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  3. #153
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    Nice article here as well:
    http://www.thespacereview.com/article/3261/1

    "ISRO’s scientists have toiled hard to develop the GSLV Mark III. This rocket can carry heavier four-ton communications satellite into Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (GTO) or about ten tons to Low Earth Orbit (LEO)."

    That's around Zenit/Ariane 4 level

  4. #154
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    Good to read that India is still working on the version of GSLV MKIII that will be able to put a 6T satellite to GEO.

    http://www.firstpost.com/tech/news-a...y-4312881.html

    At present, the GSLV Mk III rocket has a carrying capacity of four tonnes. The Indian space agency is working on increasing GSLV Mk III's carrying capacity to six tonnes.

    "Now most of the satellites will be contained to four-six tonnes," Sivan said.

    According to Sivan, the capacity enhancement is not restricted to GSLV Mk III alone but also to other rockets as it would bring down the overall launch cost.

    But that doesn't mean ISRO would freeze development of higher payload rockets.

    "We have the capability to design and build over six-tonne payload rockets. We will start designing for bigger rockets," Sivan remarked.

  5. #155
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    ISRO has been given the go ahead to develop a semi-cryogenic engine. This will enhance the lift capacity of the GSLV MKIII by 1 tonne to 5 tonnes.

    https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...w/64499802.cms

    The Space Commission has given approval to Indian Space Research Organisation (Isro) to develop a semi-croygenic engine, which will increase the lifting capability of its GSLV Mk III rocket by one tonne.
    Talking to TOI about the new project, Isro chairman K Sivan said, “After a presentation before the Space Commission, Isro has got the approval for developing the semi-cryogenic rocket stage. The deadline to develop this stage is 29 months. Once the stage is ready, the carrying capability of GSLV Mk III will increase from the existing four tonnes to five tonnes.”

  6. #156
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    The Indian Government has given ISRO the go ahead to produce 30 PSLVs and 10 GSLV III over the next 5 years. That works out at 8 launches a year.

    https://www.domain-b.com/organisatio...rogrammes.html

    The union cabinet on Wednesday approved an expenditure of Rs10.469 crore for ongoing programmes of the Indian Space Research Organisation (Isro), including satellite launches and for meeting Earth observation, navigation and other requirements to ensure continuity of production in Indian industry.

    Isro’s major programmes include development and deployment of Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle Mark-III (Phase-6) and the Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mark-III (GSLV Mk-III) continuation programme (Phase-I).

  7. #157
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    The following article from Hindustan Times is critical as it examines ISRO's failures while assessing the future. I think it's a healthier perspective:

    https://www.hindustantimes.com/india...iclNk76YP.html

    This was brought to my attention by ArsTechnica's Eric Berger and his new weekly Rocket Report:

    https://arstechnica.com/science/2018...eed-your-help/

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