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Thread: Rosetta is There!

  1. #511
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    Rosetta is there.

  2. #512
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    RIP Rosetta. It's been such a long journey. I was hoping that it would survive the descent like NEAR-Shoemaker, but I guess not.

    I like the last few images, showing a smooth surface in the center of the image. Perhaps the impact area? I know the comet is rotating and I don't know the closure rate of the spacecraft.
    The ESA said that it was closing at "walking pace", so it was probably pretty slow.

  3. #513
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hieda no Akyuu View Post
    RIP Rosetta. It's been such a long journey. I was hoping that it would survive the descent like NEAR-Shoemaker, but I guess not.
    In one report, I heard that with the slow speed of the impact there's a pretty good chance Rosetta would survive more or less intact, but there's no way to keep the antenna pointed at Earth, and so no way to receive a signal afterward.
    Conserve energy. Commute with the Hamiltonian.

  4. #514
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    Emily Lakdawalla on the loss of Rosetta.

    http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily...a-is-gone.html

    Today there is one less spacecraft returning science data from beyond Earth. The European Space Operations Centre received the final transmission from Rosetta at 11:19 September 30, UT. A very quiet control center and press room watched as the strong signal from Rosetta’s high-gain antenna suddenly vanished. A few people applauded, but the mood here is subdued.

  5. #515
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    Good to the last...drop

  6. #516
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    APOD picture of the day.

    Comet67p_from_16_km2048.jpg

  7. #517
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    Quote Originally Posted by publiusr View Post
    Good to the last...drop
    /Uptown Funk/
    OOOOH!
    /Uptown Funk/

  8. #518
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    ESA has produced a cartoon video of Rosetta and Philae. It is 25 minutes strong and tells of their ineradicable adventure and discoveries. Enjoy

    There is a English, French, Italian and Spanish versions of the video.

    http://blogs.esa.int/rosetta/2016/12...ta-and-philae/

    Watch the amazing cartoon adventures of Rosetta and Philae, now back-to-back in one special feature-length production.

    Find out how Rosetta and Philae first got inspired to visit a comet, and follow them on their incredible ten-year journey through the Solar System to their destination, flying around planets and past asteroids along the way. Watch as Philae tries to land on the comet and deals with some unexpected challenges! Learn about the fascinating observations that Rosetta made as she watched the comet change before her eyes as they got closer to the Sun and then further away again. Finally, wish Rosetta farewell, as she, too, finishes her amazing adventure on the surface of the comet. Keep watching for one last surprise!

  9. #519
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    A small Japanese space craft played a small part in helping the Rosetta mission.

    https://qz.com/912731/how-a-failed-j...ching-a-comet/

    "At the time, Rosetta was making its observations of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko’s atmosphere by measuring things like cometary gas production. But there was a problem: the Rosetta spacecraft was too close to the comet to get a full picture of what its atmosphere looked like, and would get no help on this from the Philae lander, which was focused on drilling into the comet’s surface to search for organic compounds. Information about the comet’s atmosphere, including its size, was crucial to understanding how much water was on the comet itself. What the Rosetta team needed was a distant observation point, something that could measure the whole cometary atmosphere, instead of relying on inexact mathematical models to infer its real size from a tiny bit the probe could see.
    Procyon came to the rescue: the team was able to aim its telescope at 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, and the readouts they got proved invaluable to scientists, like Fougere, working with Rosetta’s team who used them to double check the results of their models."

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  10. #520
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    Resurrecting an old thread. ESA has put together an interesting movie of 210 images from the Rosetta mission.
    http://www.esa.int/spaceinvideos/Vid...iew_of_a_comet

  11. #521
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    See the last photo Rosetta took just before it crashed into the comet


    https://www.space.com/38322-surprise...comet-67p.html

    "Nearly a year after the Rosetta spacecraft intentionally crashed into a comet, the mission's scientists have discovered a new surprise: the very last image Rosetta took before its cosmic demise."

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  12. #522
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    Captioned: Hold my beer and watch this!

  13. #523
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    Data from Rosetta and Philae help in the understanding of planet formation.

    http://www.ras.org.uk/news-and-press...anet-formation

    "The missing link in our understanding of planet formation has been revealed by the first ever spacecraft to orbit and land on a comet, say German scientists. The study is published in a recent edition of the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society."

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  14. #524
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    Emily Lakdawalla on Philae science results.

    http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily...lts-comet.html

    What is the surface of a comet like? That's one of the main questions that motivated Philae's mission to the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. That question now has an answer, at least for the spot immediately below Philae: there is a rigid crust about 10 to 50 centimeters thick, below which the comet is much more fluffy. The rigid crust is a mixture of ice and regolith, just barely held together by ice grains sticking to each other. There may possibly be a thinner, stronger crust just a centimeter thick that frustrated the penetration of Philae's instruments into the comet.

    The results came out in Icarus, the peer-reviewed journal associated with the American Astronomical Society's Division for Planetary Sciences, in an article titled "Structure and elastic parameters of the near surface of Abydos site on comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko, as obtained by SESAME/CASSE listening to the MUPUS insertion phase," by Martin Knapmeyer et al.

    As a reminder, here is what the landing site looked like to Philae: a strikingly rugged surface, with stiff, strong material sticking up in plates, fractured through and through.

  15. #525
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    "Feast your eyes on comet 67P's surface, with depth cues added"

    http://www.planetary.org/blogs/guest...epth-cues.html

    In November 2014, a little lander named Philae disconnected from the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft and descended to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Philae was supposed to fire a set of harpoons and attach itself to the surface, but things didn't go as planned. The spacecraft bounced, tumbled and eventually ended up in the shadow of a cliff. From there, it sent us wonderfully strange hints about where it was in the form of pictures.

    The images showed a fractured jumble of jagged rocks so alien that it wasn't even obvious which way was up or down. People started assembling the images into panoramas to create something a little less confusing, and it helped — a little. On comet 67P, the atmospheric cues that our eyes have evolved to judge distances on Earth are not present, so everything has the same sharp contrast. This, and the fact that the surface is so sharp, makes the images almost fractal in nature.

    I wanted to help my eyes perceive the landscape in a more familiar way, so I added some human-readable depth cues. I carefully segmented the landscape, following every edge that I could find, and based on the overlaps I created a very crude depth estimation. To simulate atmospheric scattering, I added increasing amounts of bluish tint and a loss of contrast as the landscape moves farther away from the camera.

    Here's the result:
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  16. #526
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    "Feast your eyes on comet 67P's surface, with depth cues added"
    That's really nicely done. I might not have made the "atmospheric scattering" effect quite so pronounced, but it does work well to make the depth more easily perceived.
    Conserve energy. Commute with the Hamiltonian.

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