Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 94

Thread: Hayabusa 2 - Japan's sample return probe to asteroid 1999 JU3

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,756

    Hayabusa 2 - Japan's sample return probe to asteroid 1999 JU3

    Japan's 2nd sample return asteroid mission is set to take off as early as December this year.

    http://spaceflightnow.com/news/n1409.../#.VAWglKPRV1o

    The mission will take off on top of an H-2A launcher as soon as December, fly to an asteroid scientists believe is a relic from the genesis of the solar system, drop a European-built lander, and return to Earth in 2020 with extraterrestrial rock samples.

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency revealed Hayabusa 2 to media Sunday as it neared the finish line in a four-year effort to design, construct and test the spacecraft.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    4,301
    I wish her better luck than her older sister. The best that can be said is she made it back home, poor Hayabusa-tan.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    14,883
    No, the best that can be said is that she made it back home, and fulfilled her mission of returning asteroid dust! But I sure wish Hayabusa 2 a less... complicated trip.
    ____________
    "Dumb all over, a little ugly on the side." -- Frank Zappa
    "Your right to hold an opinion is not being contested. Your expectation that it be taken seriously is." -- Jason Thompson
    "This is really very simple, but unfortunately it's very complicated." -- publius

    Moderator comments in this color | Get moderator attention using the lower left icon:
    Recommended reading: Forum Rules * Forum FAQs * Conspiracy Theory Advice * Alternate Theory Advocates Advice

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,756
    University of Arizona (UA) to explore opportunities for collaboration with the OSIRIS-REx team for the Hayabusa-2 asteroid sample return mission.

    http://www.planetary.org/blogs/guest...n-between.html

    On October 3rd, 2014, the University of Arizona (UA) hosted representatives of the Hayabusa-2 asteroid sample return mission to explore opportunities for collaboration with the OSIRIS-REx team. Following an invitation from UA President Ann Weaver Hart, a team led by Dr. Saku Tsuneta, Director General of the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), visited the UA. The meeting included Dr. Masaki Fujimoto, ISAS director of solar system exploration, as well as Dr. Shogo Tachibana and Dr. Harold Connolly, the scientists who oversee the sample analysis plans for Hayabusa-2 and OSIRIS-REx, respectively.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    13,032

    Hayabusa 2

    There may be a thread about this already, but I didn't see it. The Hayabusa 2 mission, after a weather delay yesterday, is scheduled to be launched from Tanegashima on Monday at about 1:30 pm.
    As above, so below

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,756
    Thread name is " Hayabusa 2 - Japan's sample return probe to asteroid 1999 JU3". The delay was highlighted in the thread "Year End feast 2014".

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    The beautiful north coast (Ohio)
    Posts
    48,032
    I've merged the threads
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    13,032
    Thanks. I'll try to watch it tomorrow if I have time.
    As above, so below

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,756
    Flight has been postponed again to December 3.

    http://global.jaxa.jp/news/2014/#news3430

    Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. and JAXA have decided to postpone the launch of "Hayabusa2" and piggyback payloads by the H-IIA F26 to 1:22:04 p.m. on Dec 3 (Wed. JST).

    The live launch report will begin at 12:25 p.m. on December 3 (Mon. ,JST). The report will be broadcast through the Internet.
    More details from Leonard David blog.

    http://www.leonarddavid.com/japans-a...y-for-liftoff/
    Last edited by selvaarchi; 2014-Nov-30 at 02:13 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    13,032
    About 15 minutes until launch. It's kind of live on JAXA TV, but it's just explanations and videos with musak for now...
    As above, so below

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    13,032
    The live broadcast seems to be about 3 minutes behind real time, so it's about 10 minutes on their time.
    As above, so below

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    13,032
    It's strange, someone is counting down from like 400. They're down to 360 seconds. Everything looks good.
    As above, so below

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    13,032
    Successful launch, solid boosters have been separated.
    As above, so below

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,756
    Report from spaceflight101 on the successful launch

    http://www.spaceflight101.com/hayabu...n-updates.html
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    15,988
    Good luck, Hayabusa! Safe trip out and back!

    (Will this one have a manga about it like her sister did?)

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,756
    Emily Lakdawalla's take on the launch. It also includes a 3 hour video of the launch itself. Towards the end of the video, it shows Hayabusa separating.

    http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily...-launches.html

    There were three mini-satellites onboard the same launch vehicle. ARTSAT has posted to its Facebook page that they are receiving telemetry. I don't currently have information on PROCYON or Shin-en deployments -- I'll keep looking and update this when I find it.

    In the time between launch and departure, I whiled away the time on Twitter, enjoying the excitement about Hayabusa 2. I particularly enjoy the way that enthusiasm for space exploration manifests itself in Japanese popular culture. Here are just a few of the great space-fan-produced creative responses to Hayabusa 2 that I saw last night:

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    5,448
    More exciting than the three mini-satellites are the three mini-LANDERS on board. There are three Minerva 2 landers, designed to hop around the asteroid's surface. The original Hayabusa had just one Minerva, and it unfortunately never made it to the surface of Itokawa.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    15,988
    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    Emily Lakdawalla's take on the launch. It also includes a 3 hour video of the launch itself. Towards the end of the video, it shows Hayabusa separating.

    http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily...-launches.html
    That fanart is great. I love seeing people show their love for space exploration with art.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,756
    NASA cooperating With JAXA on Hayabusa2 Science.

    http://www.parabolicarc.com/2014/12/...ce/#more-54097

    NASA and JAXA are cooperating on the science of the mission and NASA will receive a portion of the Hayabusa2 sample in exchange for providing Deep Space Network communications and navigation support for the mission.

    Hayabusa2 builds on lessons learned from JAXA’s initial Hayabusa mission, which collected samples from a small asteroid named Itokawa and returned them to Earth in June 2010. Hayabusa2’s target is a 750 meter- wide asteroid named 1999 JU3, because of the year when it was discovered by the NASA-sponsored Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research project, Lexington, Massachusetts. This is a C-type asteroid which are thought to contain more organic material than other asteroids. Scientists hope to better understand how the solar system evolved by studying samples from these asteroids.

    “We think of C-type asteroids as being less altered than others,” says Lucy McFadden, a planetary scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. “Bringing that material back and being able to look at it in the lab — I think it’s going to be very exciting.”

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,756
    Want to learn more of Hayabua2, then read the interview with its program Manager.

    http://www.parabolicarc.com/2014/12/...ew/#more-54237

    In June 2010, asteroid explorer Hayabusa completed a seven-year journey of about 6 billion kilometers, returning to Earth with dust particles from an asteroid. Its successor, Hayabusa2, was launched on an H-IIA Launch Vehicle from the Tanegashima Space Center on December 3, 2014. Hayabusa2 will make its own journey to asteroid 1999 JU3, carrying our hopes into outer space. Just before launch, we asked Project Manager Hitoshi Kuninaka to talk about the mission.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,756
    Update on Hayabusa 2 after 3 months into it's journey.

    http://spaceflightnow.com/2015/03/09...on-checks-out/

    Three months into an interplanetary cruise expected to last three-and-a-half years, Japan’s $300 million Hayabusa 2 mission is in good health as it begins an ion-powered pursuit of an asteroid to return a piece of it to Earth.

    The robotic spacecraft is already traveling more than 20 million miles from Earth after launching Dec. 3, and Japanese officials say the probe has passed health checks and is ready for the long-distance journey ahead.

    The Hayabusa 2 spacecraft “completed its initial functional confirmation period on March 2, 2015, as all scheduled checkout and evaluation of acquired data were completed,” the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency said in a statement. “The explorer has been under inspection for about three months after its launch on Dec. 3, 2014.”

    The probe carries four ion thrusters to nudge it on course toward asteroid 1999 JU3, a carbon-rich world just 900 meters — about 3,000 feet — across with a tenuous gravity field 60,000 times weaker than Earth’s.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    15,988
    Good to hear.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,756
    ESA to support Hayabusa-2 with their tracking and establishing radio contact.

    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Tr...ssion_999.html

    ESA is set to support Japan's 'touch-and-go' Hayabusa-2 spacecraft, now en route to a little-known asteroid, helping to boost the scientific return from this audacious mission. A flawless launch last December marked the start of a six-year round-trip for Japan's Hayabusa-2, which is on course to arrive at the carbon-rich asteroid 1999 JU3 in June 2018.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,756
    So soon after Hayabusa-2 has taken off to it's target, one of the secondary payload included with it has had a setback. PROCYON's ion engine stopped working in mid-March 2015.

    http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily...on-update.html

    PROCYON (PRoximate Object Close flYby with Optical Navigation) is a microsatellite that launched on December 3 as a secondary payload with Hayabusa 2. The mission has now selected their asteroid flyby target -- a binary asteroid named 2000 DP107 -- but is reporting a problem with their ion engines.

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    188
    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    So soon after Hayabusa-2 has taken off to it's target, one of the secondary payload included with it has had a setback. PROCYON's ion engine stopped working in mid-March 2015.

    http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily...on-update.html
    JAXA couldn't fix the problem, thought to be caused by metal dust in the engine. So, PROCYON will miss its planned flyby. http://spaceflightnow.com/2015/05/12...steroid-flyby/

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    15,988
    Drat.

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,756
    Have you ever wanted to name an asteroid?

    http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily...-asteroid.html

    JAXA is offering the opportunity to name Hayabusa2's target asteroid, 1999 JU3 to the public through a contest that runs through August 31. There are few conditions on the application process except the standard ones imposed by the IAU:

    no more than 16 characters long (including any spaces or punctuation);
    preferably one word;
    pronounceable (in some language);
    written using Latin characters (transliterations of names from languages not written using Latin characters are acceptable);
    non-offensive;
    not identical with or even too similar to an existing name of a minor planet or natural planetary satellite.

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    15,988
    Certainly, but finding a name that hasn't already been used will be tricky... There are a LOT of named asteroids...

    (That's why Eris couldn't be Persephone or, despite the e-mail I wrote to Mike Brown when I was 11, Minerva. Venetia Burney made it look so easy...)

  29. #29
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    N.E.Ohio
    Posts
    22,006
    At least this "Name the..." scheme program is planned to wind it's way to the IAU.

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,756
    Quote Originally Posted by NEOWatcher View Post
    At least this "Name the..." scheme program is planned to wind it's way to the IAU.
    Not sure it did wind it's way to the IAU but it now does have a name - Ryugu

    http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily...-asteroid.html

    Posted by Emily Lakdawalla

    JAXA announced today the results of the naming contest for Hayabusa2. The target of the sample-return mission, formerly known as 1999 JU3 and still numbered 162173, is now named 162173 Ryugu.

    Asteroid 1999 JU3, a target of the Asteroid Explorer “Hayabusa2,” was named “Ryugu”. One major reason for the selection was that, in the Japanese ancient story “Urashima Taro”, the main character, Taro Urashima, brought back a casket from the Dragon’s palace, or the “Ryugu” Castle, at the bottom of the ocean, and the theme of “bringing back a treasure” is common as the Hayabusa2 will also bring back a capsule with samples. It was selected among 7,336 entries. Thank you very much to so many of you who took part in the naming campaign.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •