Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 61 to 63 of 63

Thread: Hayabusa 2 - Japan's sample return probe to asteroid 1999 JU3

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Norfolk UK and some of me is in Northern France
    Posts
    7,640
    It's a very ambitious technical feat, including both a bullet and a heavy impactor, if it shoots back it will really mess with my prejudices. I'm impressed anyway that they got this far already.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,435
    The best pictures of Ryugu to date.

    http://www.planetary.org/blogs/jason...yugu-20km.html

    Hayabusa2 arrived at asteroid Ryugu back on June 27. Since then, it has been holding at a distance of 20 kilometers while flight controllers back on Earth check out its instruments. At the end of July, the spacecraft will start descending to a height of just 5 kilometers for medium-altitude observations.

    The project has been quiet for a couple weeks, but today, JAXA released some new goodies! First, two new global views, the second of which really brings the bright object at the north pole into focus:

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,435
    Ryugu is most likely made of asteroid pieces joined together by gravity.

    https://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/en/news/20180713_01/

    NHK has learned that scientists now believe the asteroid Ryugu was likely formed from a collection of asteroid fragments.

    Japan's Hayabusa2 spacecraft began observing Ryugu after it reached 20 kilometers from the asteroid on June 27th.

    Ryugu is located about 300 million kilometers from Earth and is around 900 meters in diameter. Scientists hope that water and organic materials are present in the asteroid. But how it came into being was not known.

    A team of researchers at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency is examining images beamed back from the probe.

    The group says Ryugu has small and large rocks on its surface, with some estimated to be 100 to 200 meters long.

    The team says the terrain is similar to that of the asteroid Itokawa, where the probe's predecessor landed in 2005.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •