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Thread: China's future space plans

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    China's future space plans

    China has established itself as one of the major space players in the last decade. They now have plans to push their space plans even further.

    http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/ch..._133838367.htm

    China hopes to put a rover on Mars around 2020, complete a manned space station around 2022 and test a heavy carrier rocket around 2030, a top space scientist revealed Sunday.

    Lei Fanpei, chairman of the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASC), the main contractor for the space program, revealed the details in an interview with Xinhua after the launch of CBERS-4, a satellite jointly developed with Brazil, from the Taiyuan base, by a Long March-4B rocket.

    It was the 200th flight of the Long March variants since April 1970 when a Long March-1 carried China's first satellite, Dongfanghong-1, into space.

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    Just like the US, China is investing effort into 3D printing machines for use in space.

    http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/ch..._133839895.htm

    Scientists have produced a 3D printing machine, the first of its kind in China, which astronauts will be able to use while on space missions, according to the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASTC) on Monday.

    The machine is capable of printing optical lens brackets used in space borne equipment, complicated components used in nuclear power testing equipment, impellers used in aircraft research and special-shaped gears used in automobile engines, said Wang Lianfeng, a senior engineer with CASTC Shanghai's research arm.

    The machine, which uses both long-wave fiber and short-wave carbon dioxide lasers, can produce items smaller than 250 millimeters.

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    China's GPS will be operational by 2020.

    http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/sc..._133842888.htm

    The Beidou Navigation Satellite System -- China's independently developed global navigation satellite system (GNSS) -- will have a constellation of 35 satellites and be ready to provide global users with geo-positioning by 2020, an insider said Tuesday.

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    A video that throws a glimmer of light into China's space plans. The video is 43 minutes long and worth watching.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iZvyrvQO01Y

    Inside a spaceship at Jiuquan Launch Facility, three men sit on top of 500 tons of liquid fuel. A controlled explosion will blast them three hundred kilometers into space, and into the record books. This is China’s next great leap into space.

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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    A video that throws a glimmer of light into China's space plans. The video is 43 minutes long and worth watching.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iZvyrvQO01Y
    I only saw the intro, and it does look interesting. When I have time, I will have to watch.

    For the time being, I think Launch Window's post with a recap of their plans will do.

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    A Chinese company that is focusing its efforts not in space but in the region 4 to 100 kilometers above earth. Picture of their Apollo Base in Longgang District of Shenzhen, China looks impressive.

    http://english.cri.cn/12394/2014/12/23/1261s857912.htm

    Chinese high-tech company Kuang-Chi Science on Monday unveiled its massive scientific base which shed light on the company's work in near-space exploration.

    The Apollo Base, located in Longgang District of Shenzhen, houses Cloud, an airship-like vehicle which is scheduled to launch next month.

    Designed to work at an altitude of four kilometers, Cloud will work like a "lower-level satellite" and provide services for WiFi communications and big data collection.

    Kuang-Chi Science is also working on a spacecraft dubbed Travel, which will eventually become a shuttle bus for near-space travel.

    The unmanned maiden flight of Travel is slated for the first half of 2015.

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    And in this article you can see the Chinese space programs unyeilding commitiment to the safety of Chinese citizens:

    http://spaceflightnow.com/2015/01/04...n-rural-china/

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garrison View Post
    And in this article you can see the Chinese space programs unyeilding commitiment to the safety of Chinese citizens:
    Just because they decided to drop toxic rockets on to their citizens?

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    Quote Originally Posted by NEOWatcher View Post
    Just because they decided to drop toxic rockets on to their citizens?
    Did you mean "stop dropping" or did you want them to drop toxic rockets........

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    Yes, I meant stop.

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    China's space plans for this year. Was surprised to read the first launch of the Long March 5 will be this year. I hope that happens as a lot of their plans for their space station depends on it.

    http://www.wantchinatimes.com/news-s...1&MainCatID=11

    Liang Xiaohong explains China's space projects for 2015 during the annual meetings of the National People's Congress and Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference held in Beijing.
    In addition to the launch of the CZ-11, Liang said that the CZ-5, China's next-generation heavy lift launch system will be revealed to the public for the first time at Hainan island's Wenchang Satellite Launch Center. Designed to match the capabilities of American EELV-sized vehicles such as the Delta IV, Atlas V, and Falcon 9, the CZ-5 is currently China's largest rocket system. Its first flight is scheduled to take place this year as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    Was surprised to read the first launch of the Long March 5 will be this year.
    Why are you surprised?
    You provided links to 3 different articles in the Long March thread that said it will launch in late 2015.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NEOWatcher View Post
    Why are you surprised?
    You provided links to 3 different articles in the Long March thread that said it will launch in late 2015.
    The last report was the launch date had slipped to 2016.

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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    The last report was the launch date had slipped to 2016.
    Ok; I think I found it. They went back and forth with the 5, 7, and 11, and it got hard to follow.
    Plus; there was a lot of "by 2016" comments going on which could also be misinterpreted, or mistranslated.

    All in All, without actual dates, it looks like things are close enough to say it hasn't changed much --- at least not a "surprising" amount. Although; it isn't common for earlier dates in spaceflight.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NEOWatcher View Post
    Ok; I think I found it. They went back and forth with the 5, 7, and 11, and it got hard to follow.
    Plus; there was a lot of "by 2016" comments going on which could also be misinterpreted, or mistranslated.

    All in All, without actual dates, it looks like things are close enough to say it hasn't changed much --- at least not a "surprising" amount. Although; it isn't common for earlier dates in spaceflight.
    My bigger surprise is now LM5 will fly before the LM7.

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    Chinese space authorities have announced plans to launch more than 40 different spacecraft into orbit this year.

    http://www.ecns.cn/2015/03-18/158462.shtml

    2013 saw Chinese space authorities conduct 16 separate launches.

    Zhao Xiaojin, director of the Space Department with the China Aerospace and Science Technology Corporation says most of the spacecraft to be put into orbit this year will be satellites.

    "They will be mainly communication satellites, or geosynchronous satellites orbiting at the height of 36-thousand miles. There will also be some remote sensing satellites sent up to observe the earth, as well as navigation satellites for the Beidou system."

    Chinese space authorities do say a number of "cutting-edge" technologies will also be tested for the first time.

    This is scheduled to include the launch of the Yuanzheng I upper stage aircraft, dubbed the "space shuttle bus."

    The experimental craft is scheduled to independently send a Beidou satellite into orbit after being launched into space from a terrestrial flight pattern in earth's atmosphere.

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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    Chinese space authorities have announced plans to launch more than 40 different spacecraft into orbit this year.
    They will be mainly communication satellites, or geosynchronous satellites orbiting at the height of 36-thousand miles.
    Sounds like a conversion error. Geosynch is about 36000 km from the surface.

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    YaaHooo China has started bringing out their new space toys.

    The start was signalled when they successfully put the first satellite in its Beidou-3 navigation system into orbit on Monday, To help it into its correct orbit they used for the first time their YZ1 ( known by its full name of Yuanzheng-1 - referred else where in this forum as their space tug).

    Over the next 12 to 18 months China will be introducing the following new space systems -

    1) Long March 6 - the new launch vehicle for small satellites. Launched 20th September 2015

    2) Long March 11 - Their largest solid fuel rocket to launch small satellites quickly. Launched 25th September 2015

    3) DAMPE - China's Dark Matter Particle Explorer Launched 17th December 2015

    4) Shijian-10 - China's retrievable microgravity experimental satellite Launched 6th April 2016

    5) Wenchang Space Launch Center - China's new space port. 1st rocket launch 25th June 2916

    6) Long March 7 - their launch vehicle for astronauts and cargo ships. Launched 25th June 2916

    7) Yuanzheng-1A upgraded space tug Launched 25th June 2916

    8) Aolong-1 - a space debris clearer satellite Launched 25th June 2916

    9) Tianyuan-1 - in-space refueling system for orbital satellites. Launched 25th June 2916

    10) FAST - Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Telescope. Completed 3ed July 2016

    11) QUESS - China's QUantum Experiments at Space Scale Launched 15th August 2016

    12) Tiangong-2 - their next test space station Launched 15th September 2916

    13) POLAR - Polarimetry of Gamma-ray Bursts Launched 15th September 2016 on top of Tiangong-2

    14) Shenzhou-11 - manned mission to Tiangong-2 with two male astronauts for 30 days Launched 17th October 2016

    15) Banxing-2 - satellite used as a remote space 'selfie stick' - released 23rd October 2016

    16) Long March 5 - their future work horse. Launched 3rd November 2016

    17) Shijian-17 - satellite with experimental ion engine Launched 3rd November 2016

    18) Yuanzheng-2 - space tug to be used with the Long March 5 Launched 3rd November 2016

    19) XPNAV-1 - X-ray pulsar navigation satellite Launched 10th November 2016

    20) FY 4 satellite - China's second generation of weather satellite Launched 11th December 2016

    21) TanSat first carbon monitoring satellite Launched 21st December 2016




    In 2017 -

    1) Kaituozhe-2 - the solid-fuel rocket will be able to place a 2-metric-ton payload into a sun-synchronous orbit Launched 3rd March 2017

    2) HXMT - China's Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope. Launched 15th June 2017

    3) Tianzhou-1 - their cargo ship

    4) Shenzhou-12 - manned mission to Tiangong-2 with at least one female astronaut.

    5) Naga-L - new launch vehicle for export capable of launching small satellites

    6) Chang'e 5 - sample return mission to the moon



    In 2018 -

    1) Long March 8 - the new launch vehicle for small satellites up to 2.5 tons.

    2) Chang'e 4 - Lander and rover to the moon's far side

    3) Tianhe-1 - 1st module of their space station

    4) China’s next-gen human spacecraft 14 ton version

    5) CFOSAT - China-France Oceanography Satellite

    In 2019

    1) Wengtian - The 2nd module of their space station

    In 2020

    1) The Mars orbiter, lander and rover launched

    2) Mengtian -The 3rd module of their space station

    3) China's telescope dubbed 'China's Hubble'.

    4) China’s next-gen human spacecraft 20 ton version

    5) Completion of BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS)

    6) WCOM - Water Cycle Observation Mission

    In 2021

    1) The Mars orbiter inserted into Mars Orbit

    2) Mars lander and rover deployed

    In 2030

    1) Long March 9 - China's equivalent to NASA's SLS

    http://www.spaceflight101.com/long-m...st-launch.html

    The dual-engine cluster of the cryogenic third stage boosted the stack into an orbit of 194 by 25,307 Kilometers at an inclination of 55 degrees. After separation from the third stage that remained in this orbit, the YZ-1 Upper Stage assumed control for its first flight.

    YZ1, known by its full name of Yuanzheng-1 which translates to Expedition-1, is a liquid-fueled upper stage capable of operating for six and a half hours during which it can conduct two burns spaced by a coast phase. The YZ-1 upper stage uses storable propellants, Unsymmetrical Dimethylhydrazine as fuel and Nitrogen Tetroxide oxidizer, consumed by a single main engine that delivers 6.5 Kilonewtons of thrust (663 Kilogram-force) at a specific impulse of 315 seconds.
    Last edited by selvaarchi; 2017-Jun-15 at 08:17 AM. Reason: adding LM-8
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    China has always aimed to be seen as a leading space nation. This year they will most probably overtake Russia in the number of satellites in orbit.

    http://www.ecns.cn/m/cns-wire/2015/04-02/160407.shtml

    Earlier media reports said China plans to launch another 120 satellites -- about 20 communications satellites, 70 remote sensing satellites and 30 navigation satellites. The number of Chinese satellites in orbit will overtake Russia in 2015 to rank second in the world.
    I am because we are
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    The following article talking about China exhibiting the LM5 and the LM7 for the first time overseas (in Brazil) also has a line that says they are busy developing the Yuangzheng-2 (no details on the enhancements to the new model).

    http://www.wantchinatimes.com/news-s...00002&cid=1101

    China also recently conducted a successful test of its Yuanzheng-1 (Expedition-1) upper stage aircraft for multistage rockets, dubbed the "space shuttle bus." Li believes that a lot of European countries are very interested in this technology as the shuttle can reduce the amount of time it takes a satellite to enter into orbit from around 10 days to just six hours. Additionally, the increased energy efficiency can increase the life of the satellite, he said, adding that China is also currently developing the Yuangzheng-2.

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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    Just like the US, China is investing effort into 3D printing machines for use in space.

    http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/ch..._133839895.htm
    Looks like they are making rapid progress in using 3D printing technology. They have made use of it to make parts of their space suits.

    http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/20..._134209220.htm

    Chinese researchers have used 3D printing technology to make a safer space suit for astronauts while spacewalking.

    A research center under the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation used a 3D printer to create the vent pipes and the flanges connecting the pipes used on extravehicular space suit, according to a recent report from China Space News.

    The vent pipe and the flange as a whole can improve the reliability and safety of the space suit, and suits can be made more efficiently. Researchers will use the technique to make more parts, says the report.

    The technology has been approved by the Scientific Research Training Center for Chinese Astronauts.

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    Another space technology where China is playing catch up is electric propulsion. It is a technology already mastered by the United States, Russia, Europe and Japan. They hope to launch their first full electric propulsion satellite into orbit around 2020.

    http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/20..._134308003.htm

    China also plans to launch a hybrid propulsion communication satellite at the end of 2016. The electric propulsion system would be used in China's space station in the future, Wang says.

    Electric propulsion systems are mainly of the ion thruster or Hall thruster types. They are essentially similar, using electricity to ionize the propellant, usually xenon, and accelerating the ions to produce thrust.

    The biggest advantage of electric propulsion is that it uses a tenth of the amount of propellant required by traditional chemical propulsion systems. A typical 5-tonne chemical propulsion communication satellite contains three tonnes of fuel. With an electric propulsion system, it would only need 300 kg of propellant, Wang says.

    "The benefit is obvious. The weight of the satellite can be greatly decreased, so a rocket can send two satellites into orbit at the same time; or we can launch a cheap, small rocket to carry the satellite, which will greatly save on launch costs. We can also put more equipment on the satellite to improve its functions," Wang says.

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    China's R&D in docking technology has given them the world's most sensitive "eye" that enables the autonomous rendezvous and docking of two spacecraft -- flying eight times faster than bullets -- more efficiently and safely.

    http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/20..._134345725.htm

    The "eye" is China's newly developed third-generation rendezvous and docking CCD optical imaging sensor. It will be used on China's second orbiting space lab, Tiangong-2, the Chang'e-5 lunar probe and the permanent manned space station, according to China Academy of Space Technology (CAST).

    China plans to launch Tiangong-2 in 2016, and send Chang'e-5 to collect samples from the moon and return to earth around 2017. It also aims to put a permanent manned space station into service around 2022.

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    I don't get "8 times faster than bullets". huh?

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    Quote Originally Posted by 7cscb View Post
    I don't get "8 times faster than bullets". huh?
    It's a buzz phrase that reporters like to use that don't really mean anything except to sound impressive.

    With bullet speeds varying so much, and the fact that closing speed is what matters, it really doesn't mean much.


    I just wonder how they measure sensitivity and what they compare it to.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NEOWatcher View Post
    It's a buzz phrase that reporters like to use that don't really mean anything except to sound impressive.

    With bullet speeds varying so much, and the fact that closing speed is what matters, it really doesn't mean much.


    I just wonder how they measure sensitivity and what they compare it to.
    I will not get too bogged down with the reporter's translation. What is more important is, their are still working on their docking technology and it will be used in their future missions.

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    China is now going through the 60s feel that the US has. See my post #18 in this thread on what to expect in the near future. The latest article now talks about what they intend to do with these new toys.

    http://www.popsci.com/china-show-cases-space-plans

    With nearly 130 spacecraft and satellites in orbit, China has shot its way to global prominence in space, like so many terrestrial technological categories. And this is just the start. Far off future Chinese space projects include a spate of missions to Mars and Jupiter, large space stations,130 ton payload super heavy "Moon rockets", electrically propelled spacecraft and reusable launch systems.

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    China is experimenting with new technology in space. They are now trying to develop a retrievable device that can be used in outer space scientific research.

    http://www.chinatopix.com/articles/5...llite-2016.htm

    Project chief Hu Wenrui said that the retrievable satellite was made to carry out outer space studies in "microgravity and space life science."

    Upon arriving in the outer space, the SJ-10 satellite will perform 19 experiments in 6 science disciplines. Included in the disciples are space radiation, microgravity biological effect and other space techniques, as per International Business Times.

    Since the satellite is retrievable, it has a reentry capsule that would only orbit for 12 days and would immediately return to the living planet.

    According to the announcement, eight fluid physics experiments will be performed in the orbital module, which will remain in space for at least 15 days.

  29. #29
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    Nothing different there than this one you posted, except the tone of the article.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NEOWatcher View Post
    Nothing different there than this one you posted, except the tone of the article.
    You are again correct. The way it was written, I took it to be something new.

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