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Thread: Space Launch System (SLS)

  1. #181
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    Now NASA is planning more SLS Block 1 launches.

    http://spacenews.com/nasa-adding-mor...s-to-manifest/

    With two more launches of the Block 1 version of the Space Launch System now planned, NASA is starting work to procure and human-rate additional upper stages.

    NASA originally expected to fly the Block 1 version of the SLS only once before moving to the more powerful Block 1B version of the rocket. The Block 1 uses an upper stage known as the Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (ICPS), based on the Delta 4 upper stage. The Block 1B will replace the ICPS with the Exploration Upper Stage, a larger upper stage under development.

    However, with funding from Congress provided in the fiscal year 2018 omnibus appropriations bill to build a second mobile launch platform, NASA now expects to use the Block 1 version more than once. Those additional launches can take place using the existing mobile launch platform while the new one, designed for Block 1B, is built. That move is designed to reduce concerns about a long gap between SLS missions had NASA gone through with original plans to modify the mobile launch platform after the first SLS mission so it could be used for the Block 1B.

  2. #182
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    "Digging into the details of Orion’s EM-1 test flight"

    https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2018...1-test-flight/

    As NASA continues to analyze and refine the profile for the Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1) test flight, more information about the multi-week mission is beginning to be detailed. The Orion spacecraft will fly into orbit around the Moon before returning to Earth in a shakedown mission before the first crew flies in Orion on Exploration Mission-2 (EM-2).

    EM-1 will be the first flight of Orion’s European Service Module, also pairing it with the Crew Module for the first time, with hundreds of test objectives to be evaluated during the mission.

    Orion will fly on EM-1 for the first time with all of its primary spacecraft elements. The European Service Module (ESM) will make its first flight, connected to the second crew module (CM) unit by a crew module adapter (CMA) making its first flight.

  3. #183
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    "Orion's third flight will haul two pieces of a space station to lunar orbit"

    http://www.planetary.org/blogs/jason...3-gateway.html

    NASA says astronauts will haul two pieces of a small space station to lunar orbit in 2024, during the second crewed flight of the Orion spacecraft.

    Plans for the station, which is now referred to as the Gateway, have been shaping up since 2017. The Gateway, Space Launch System rocket and Orion crew capsule represent the core of NASA's plans to send humans back to the Moon and on to Mars. The Gateway is designed to host astronauts for short-term stays, serve as a waypoint for crewed surface missions and receive samples robotically collected from both the Moon and Mars.
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  4. #184
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    Not good news by Leonard David . The title of his article is - "NASA’s SLS Booster – The Someday Launch System"

    https://www.leonarddavid.com/report-...launch-system/

    Originally, the first uncrewed mission of the combined Space Launch System (SLS)/Orion system known as Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1) had a launch readiness date of December 2017,

    The first crewed mission of the system known as Exploration Mission-2 (EM-2) was projected to launch in mid-2021.

    Launch slips

    However, a new NASA Office of Inspector General (OIG) report has found, due to continued production delays with the SLS Core Stage and upcoming critical testing and integration activities, current NASA schedules indicate launch dates of mid-2020 and mid-2022, respectively.

    With $5.3 billion expended as of August 2018 out of $6.2 billion allocated for the Boeing Stages contract, NASA expects Boeing to reach the contract’s value by early 2019—nearly 3 years before the contract is supposed to end—without final delivery of a single Core Stage or EUS.
    I am because we are
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  5. #185
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    As I said, I hope to be alive when this happens.
    The clock keeps ticking.

  6. #186
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    Not good news by Leonard David . The title of his article is - "NASA’s SLS Booster – The Someday Launch System"

    https://www.leonarddavid.com/report-...launch-system/
    And it still may beat the JWST....
    Fifteen years behind and counting.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  7. #187
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    Some retorts
    http://www.forbes.com/sites/lorentho.../#79ae3db46070
    https://twitter.com/SciGuySpace/status/ ... itico.html

    SLS will use metal tanks and LH2, something Musk doesn't want.

    Also--this plays better with hydrolox lander architecture, like this:
    https://www.lockheedmartin.com/conte...726.1538592165

  8. #188
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    Quote Originally Posted by publiusr View Post
    Some retorts
    http://www.forbes.com/sites/lorentho.../#79ae3db46070
    https://twitter.com/SciGuySpace/status/ ... itico.html

    SLS will use metal tanks and LH2, something Musk doesn't want.

    Also--this plays better with hydrolox lander architecture, like this:
    https://www.lockheedmartin.com/conte...726.1538592165
    Loren Thompson? COO of the Lexington Institute, and long-time Boeing/Lockheed booster and writer of ridiculous SpaceX hit pieces? His credibility's down there with Andy Pasztor and Richard Hagar.

  9. #189
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    There might be slippage of the 2020 lunch date of first flight of Space Launch System.

    https://spacenews.com/nasa-reassessi...st-sls-launch/

    The director of NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center said March 5 that the agency is “reassessing” the 2020 launch date for the first flight of its Space Launch System, suggesting that the mission may face further delays.

    During a question-and-answer session at a Space Transportation Association luncheon here, Jody Singer said the launch readiness date for Exploration Mission (EM) 1 is still in 2020, but did not give a more precise estimate of the date even as NASA reviews possible changes to it.

    “We do know that we are reassessing those dates to see if that date will work, based on making sure we have the vehicle ready, and ready to go fly safely,” she said. “We are assessing that date. Our launch readiness date is still 2020, and we’re doing everything within our power to make sure that we support that.”

    Singer didn’t identify the specific issues with EM-1 that prompted the reassessment, but NASA officials have previously said that the core stage of the SLS, along with the European-built service module for the Orion spacecraft that SLS will launch, were the items on the critical path for the mission.
    I am because we are
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  10. #190
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    There might be slippage of the 2020 lunch date of first flight of Space Launch System.

    https://spacenews.com/nasa-reassessi...st-sls-launch/
    More like 2021/22, the program's a mess and GAO is readying another blistering report. The first several flights will be using Block 1, not Block 1B as had been planned for flights 2 and beyond because the Exploration Upper Stage is being redesigned. It'll fly ICPS, based on Delta IV',s DCSS upper stage.

    It's to the point NASA's Europa Clipper team has developed contingency plans to fly on Falcon Heavy. With a 64+ ton capacity to LEO vs SLS Block 1's 70 tons all FH needs is a Star 48 kick stage and they're good to go.

    FH is also up for two Gateway launches; the competed Power & Propulsion Element and a European module (per RussianSpaceWeb)
    Last edited by docmordrid; 2019-Mar-09 at 07:21 PM.

  11. #191
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    Still no hydrogen capability. That's the big reason I still support SLS--NTRs down the road.

  12. #192
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    Quote Originally Posted by publiusr View Post
    Still no hydrogen capability. That's the big reason I still support SLS--NTRs down the road.
    That makes no sense. SLS will be long dead by the time any NTR is flying, and the cost delta between SLS and Falcon Heavy for a single launch would pay for equipping multiple pads with LH2 handling equipment.

  13. #193
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    Not to mention the anti-nuclear weenies who wring their hands every time an RTG lifts off, much less a full-blown reactor. Just watch when the first Kilopower goes uphill, they'll be trolling every space site comment section.

  14. #194
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    In some good news, an SLS/Europa Clipper model has been tested:
    https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2019...r-wind-tunnel/

  15. #195
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    Progress:
    https://www.nasa.gov/feature/moontom...ma-to-the-moon
    https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2019...mps-fuel-tank/

    SLS launched probe outlined
    http://kiss.caltech.edu/workshops/is...ange_final.pdf

    On other options:
    https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2019...orion-options/

    Some quotes...
    Ultimately, SLS won, beating the alternatives – such as a fully expendable Falcon Heavy – as the best option to launch EM-1 per the provided guidelines...“The thing that kept me up at night just gagging was the prospect of needing to shift twenty-five metric tons three kilometers per second out of low Earth orbit into trans-lunar injection...“We weren’t going to be able to fit the command module and that stack inside of a conventional payload fairing that we would have to bring to bear on either Falcon Heavy or the Delta 4 Heavy...“So from an aerodynamic standpoint it also made the most sense to leave the LAS in place and that hurt because I really wanted to get rid of that thing, but it made sense,” Wood continued.......“What that meant was that the Service Module was required to augment that TLI burn by a thousand meters per second, that’s a fair amount of delta-V that they were eating into for their mission profile and that was what was keeping them from meeting all of their objectives, so we were never able to find that closed solution.
    Last edited by publiusr; 2019-Jun-07 at 07:29 PM.

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