Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 31 to 45 of 45

Thread: Opportunity Update

  1. #31
    Glom's Avatar
    Glom is offline Insert awesome title here
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    11,188
    Is this Oppy's grand finale?

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    1,865
    Probably depends on where the dust settles.
    It made it through the last big storm, but that was years ago.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,444
    It might need a few dust devils to clean its solar panels first.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    97
    Not seeing any reports that the dust is starting to clear - rover operators must be pretty worried about it by now. Poor Oppy
    Last edited by Eadfrith; 2018-Jun-30 at 06:32 AM.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,444
    Quote Originally Posted by Eadfrith View Post
    Not seeing any reports that the dust is starting to clear - rover operators must be pretty worried about it by now. Poor Oppy
    Tried finding how long the dust storms last - they could take months to settle down

    http://earthsky.org/space/mars-dust-storms-10-things

    Scientists know to expect big dust storms on Mars, but the rapid development of the current one is surprising. Decades of Mars observations show a pattern of regional dust storms arising in northern spring and summer. In most Martian years, nearly twice as long as Earth years, the storms dissipate. But we’ve seen global dust storms in 1971, 1977, 1982, 1994, 2001 and 2007. The current storm season could last into 2019.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,444
    "Opportunity Mars Rover Still Silent Beneath Raging Dust Storm"

    https://www.space.com/41079-nasa-opp...ust-storm.html

    NASA's Opportunity Mars rover remains silent as a giant dust storm continues to swirl on the Red Planet.

    The storm began on May 30 and grew to encircle the entire planet a few weeks later. With so much dust in the air, the solar-powered Opportunity hasn't been able to recharge its batteries and has entered a sort of hibernation.

    "We have not heard from the rover for a couple of weeks," said Ray Arvidson of Washington University in Saint Louis. Arvidson is deputy principal investigator for the Mars Exploration Rover mission, which originally consisted of Opportunity and its twin, Spirit. The duo touched down in different locations on Mars a few weeks apart in January 2004.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    The Space Coast
    Posts
    4,198
    Ugh. "Raging" is not even remotely correct. Dust "storms" on Mars are events where very fine dust is lofted into the upper atmosphere, blocking the Sun. There's probably very little wind on the surface associated with any of it. "Raging" implies that dust is ripping across the surface, sandblasting everything in its path (a la The Martian's incorrect portrayal).

    But yes, it's troubling for Opportunity, isn't it?

    CJSF
    "Find a way to show what would happen
    If you were incorrect
    A fact is just a fantasy
    Unless it can be checked
    Make a test
    Test it out"
    -They Might Be Giants, "Put It To The Test"


    lonelybirder.org

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    1,865
    "Raging"
    Well, lightning back in 2009.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    768
    I have searched for an expected end of the massive dust storm, but haven't found any estimate. Has anyone found an estimated end?

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,444
    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    I have searched for an expected end of the massive dust storm, but haven't found any estimate. Has anyone found an estimated end?
    Only one I had found was what I posted in post 35 - The current storm season could last into 2019.

  11. #41
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    97
    A month with no contact, they must be getting pretty nervous now.

  12. #42
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    768
    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    Only one I had found was what I posted in post 35 - The current storm season could last into 2019.
    Thanks for the refresher. We shall see.

  13. #43
    Glom's Avatar
    Glom is offline Insert awesome title here
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    11,188
    Quote Originally Posted by CJSF View Post
    Ugh. "Raging" is not even remotely correct. Dust "storms" on Mars are events where very fine dust is lofted into the upper atmosphere, blocking the Sun. There's probably very little wind on the surface associated with any of it. "Raging" implies that dust is ripping across the surface, sandblasting everything in its path (a la The Martian's incorrect portrayal).

    But yes, it's troubling for Opportunity, isn't it?

    CJSF
    Next you'll be trying to tell me nebulae aren't like colourful cumulonimbus clouds that sometimes even have lightning.

  14. #44
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    The Space Coast
    Posts
    4,198
    Quote Originally Posted by Glom View Post
    Next you'll be trying to tell me nebulae aren't like colourful cumulonimbus clouds that sometimes even have lightning.
    Your pattern indicates 2-dimensional thinking...

    CJSF
    "Find a way to show what would happen
    If you were incorrect
    A fact is just a fantasy
    Unless it can be checked
    Make a test
    Test it out"
    -They Might Be Giants, "Put It To The Test"


    lonelybirder.org

  15. #45
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,444
    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    Thanks for the refresher. We shall see.
    Much more positive assessment in the latest report.

    https://www.cnet.com/news/nasa-mars-...-calming-down/

    Scott Guzewich, a member of the Curiosity rover team, posted a mission update to a NASA blog on Friday noting a slow decline over the last two weeks in the amount of dust seen over Gale Crater. He says "it's possible the dust storm has reached its 'peak.'"

    "We may now be entering (or soon entering) the period where the massive amount of dust in the atmosphere will slowly settle out and Mars' shrouded surface may once again be clearly visible from space," says Guzewich.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •