Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 61 to 86 of 86

Thread: Post-International Space Station?

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    10,929
    More talk about wet-stage stations
    http://spectrum.ieee.org/tech-talk/a...ket-fuel-tanks

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,712
    This week's release of "The Space Review" highlights a free ebook released by NASA titled "Economic Development of Low Earth Orbit".

    http://www.thespacereview.com/article/3050/1

    NASA is making a major bet on the future of commercial space activities in low Earth orbit. The agency has been increasingly emphasizing commercial use of the International Space Station, ranging from experiments performed there to the use of the station as a launch pad for smallsats and, just recently, soliciting ideas for installing a commercial module on the ISS (see “A stepping-stone to commercial space stations”, The Space Review, July 25, 2016). The goal of this is to stimulate both a demand for various commercial activities in LEO, and a supply of facilities to service that demand, that can continue after the ISS is retired some time in the mid to late 2020s.

    Such an effort brings with it major challenges, some technical and some economic. It’s the latter that is the subject of Economic Development of Low Earth Orbit, a free ebook released by NASA this summer. It’s a collection of research papers commissioned by the space agency to examine economic issues associated with NASA’s commercialization efforts. While not a comprehensive exploration of the subject, the papers included in the book touch on some of the key problems, and potential solutions to them, that commercialization effort faces.

    The five papers included in the book take a look at both big-picture issues, such as facilitating commercialization of work on the ISS, to a specific examination of the potential of one particular area, protein crystallization for drug development. These documents are research papers, rather than how-to guides, but do offer some recommendations for how NASA can help further commercial activities in LEO.

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,712
    The latest issue of "The Space Review" carries an article on - Pondering the future of the International Space Station. Bottom line - there is no clear path of what to do next

    http://www.thespacereview.com/article/3297/1

    Throughout the conference, though, during the panel sessions and paper presentations, at breaks and in discussions in a sometimes-congested exhibit hall, there was an undercurrent of uncertainty. Just how long will the ISS, this “incredible structure” in low Earth orbit, be around?

    NASA and the other international partners have committed to operating the station through 2024. But what happens after that remains unknown. Some of the commercial partners using the ISS, hailed at the conference, want answers sooner rather than later.

    A section of the NASA Transition Authorization Act of 2017, signed into law in March, directs NASA to develop an “ISS transition plan” by December 1, with updates every two years thereafter through 2023. That plan requires NASA to assess both its research on the ISS to support the agency’s exploration objectives as well as development of commercial activities in LEO. It also calls for cost estimates of extending ISS to 2028 and 2030, and an evaluation of the “feasible and preferred service life” of the station, among other requirements.

    NASA hasn’t said much about the work on that transition plan, and how interested it would be in another extension. Agency officials have argued in the past that they believe they can complete the research they need to do on the ISS to support its exploration goals, from mitigating human health risks for long-duration spaceflight to developing life support systems for such missions, by 2024.

    Robert Lightfoot, the acting administrator of NASA, suggested that decisions about the future of the ISS would go beyond simply determining if NASA has met its research goals on the station. There are also, he said, policy issues, including concerns about another gap in human spaceflight and NASA’s role in fostering economic development in LEO.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,712
    This thread was active 3 years ago the died down. China's launch of Tiangong-3 has slipped a year and Tiangong-2 has been a great success. The problem is now with their rocket LM-5. Once they fix the rocket problems they will be on their way. Even if the ISS gets another extension,I will expect to see ESA and Russia play some sort of roll in the CSS.

    In the mean time ISS partners are in discussion about the extension of the ISS beyond 2024 and the deep space habitat.

    http://spacenews.com/international-p...future-of-iss/

    The partner space agencies of the International Space Station said Sept. 25 they have had discussions about the future of the station beyond 2024, but indicated no urgency in making a decision.

    At a press conference during the 68th International Astronautical Congress here, NASA Acting Administrator Robert Lightfoot said he has talked with the other partners about both an extension of the ISS as well as cooperation on the agency’s proposed Deep Space Gateway, although no decisions on either were imminent.

    “We’ve got a list of criteria that we’re putting together to say what would we do post-2024,” he said, referring to past studies that conclued it’s technically feasible to operate the ISS beyond that date. “This is something that we’ve talked about pretty consistently, whether it’s at our level of the heads of agencies or the level just below.”

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,712
    Canada to build two robotic arms for the deep space habitat.

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/mo...-csa-1.4313051

    The Canadian Space Agency is working to develop robotic arms as its contribution to a small lunar outpost to be built by international partners in the next decade.

    Earlier this week, the American and Russian space agencies signed a statement long-term space projects, which focus on the so-called deep space gateway.

    The small space station would be placed in orbit between the Earth and the moon.

    "For Canada, the challenge right now is to identify what our contribution could be to humanity's next step in human exploration," said Gilles Leclerc, the Canadian agency's head of space exploration.

    "We are defining what Canada will do in the next 30 years in space."

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,712
    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    Canada to build two robotic arms for the deep space habitat.

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/mo...-csa-1.4313051
    Now the Europeans are also chipping in with their contributions to the deep space habitat (DSH).

    http://spacenews.com/european-space-...space-gateway/

    "Europe’s aerospace industry is getting ready for NASA’s proposed Deep Space Gateway, hoping Europe will have its own module at the lunar-orbit space station resupplied by a European transportation system.

    During a session on the final day of Space Tech Expo Europe in Bremen, Germany, Frederic Masson, an engineer at French space agency CNES, said France is already considering ways to increase performance of the upcoming Ariane 6 launcher to make it fit to contribute to humankind’s next big space endeavor."

    Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,712
    John Thornton, chief executive of Astrobotic, makes the case for a Deep Space Gateway (DSG).

    http://spacenews.com/op-ed-the-deep-...cislunar-port/

    How, then, do we strategically unite this groundswell of interest from the administration and NASA with international and commercial partners in a way that fosters a sustainable ecosystem of exploration and commerce on and around the moon? How do we best leverage NASA’s current investments and upcoming exploration missions in a manner that best supports America’s exploration, geopolitical, and economic interests? The answer lies with NASA’s proposed Deep Space Gateway (DSG).

    As NASA has outlined, the DSG has the potential to be an ideal platform for re-establishing and securing a sustainable American lunar presence by demonstrating technology, proving an exploration architecture, and acquiring much-needed experience for deep space missions to destinations like Mars. At the same time, the DSG’s lunar proximity and permanent presence would present an unprecedented opportunity to advance near-term surface exploration and development. It will give NASA, as well as international and commercial partners, including Astrobotic, a long-term platform from which to support our lunar activities.

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,712
    "A new edition of an international space exploration planning document to be released early next year will offer an updated plan for human missions to the moon and Mars, emphasizing the role that NASA’s proposed Deep Space Gateway could play."

    http://spacenews.com/deep-space-gate...ation-roadmap/

    In January, NASA and 14 international space agencies plan to publish their common goals for exploration, including an extended presence in low Earth orbit, a cislunar habitat, moon missions and eventual excursions to Mars, in an updated Global Exploration Roadmap being drafted by the International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG).

    Since NASA’s first flight of its heavy-lift Space Launch System with an Orion capsule is scheduled for as soon as late 2019, it’s time to decide “what we are going to do with these vehicles,” Kathy Laurini, NASA senior adviser for exploration and space operations, said during a Global Exploration Roadmap community workshop at the NASA Ames Research Center Nov. 29. “We’ve been engaged with our international partners on how we’ll use these to explore together.”

    ISECG, a voluntary organization whose members share non-binding plans and objectives, published its last Global Exploration Roadmap in 2013. ISECG members will use the new Roadmap to show domestic policymakers and funding agencies how specific programs will contribute to global endeavors, said Laurini, who also serves as ISECG chair.

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,712
    NASA has missed a deadline of 1st December 2017 to submit the report to Congress on the next step.

    http://spacenews.com/report-calls-fo...ive-platforms/

    NASA and its international partners have committed to operating the ISS only through 2024, and support for an extension of station operations beyond that point is uncertain. A NASA authorization bill enacted in March 2017 directed NASA to develop an ISS transition plan to show how the agency will shift from “from the current regime that relies heavily on NASA sponsorship to a regime where NASA could be one of many customers of a low-Earth orbit non-governmental human space flight enterprise.”

    The authorization bill set a Dec. 1 deadline for the report. However, as of earlier last month the agency had yet to submit the report to Congress.

    The report’s call for a transition plan stems from both addressing the growing utilization of the ISS as well as the expectation that research in low Earth orbit will need to continue beyond 2024. The committee noted in its report that both internal and external facilities at the ISS for hosting experiments are nearly full, but suggested that privately-developed capabilities would be a more effective means of meeting demand versus building more government-funded facilities for a station that may only operate until the mid-2020s.

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,712
    Scientific American has an article on the Deep Space Gateway (DSG) project.

    https://www.scientificamerican.com/a...on-and-beyond/

    The next chapter in cosmic exploration is starting to take shape: NASA engineers have proposed a space station that—if Congress approves its funding—would begin orbiting the moon in about a decade. A primary goal is to develop the infrastructure and experience to one day land humans on Mars.

    The Deep Space Gateway (DSG) project would likely be a collaboration among the U.S., Russia and other international partners. It would sit in a lunar orbit about 240,000 miles from Earth—1,000 times farther than the International Space Station (ISS). This would put it outside Earth's protective magnetic field, letting scientists measure the effects of deep-space radiation on humans and instruments. The station could also be a relay point for expeditions to the moon's surface. Plans for lunar landers—bearing humans or robots, or both—are still under discussion. NASA officials say astronauts and construction materials could be ferried to lunar orbit in four Orion rocket launches sometime after 2019

  11. #71
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    248
    It seems to me this type of project should include China and likely will. There will likely be strong commercial participation.

    ...hopefully.

  12. #72
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,712
    Quote Originally Posted by 7cscb View Post
    It seems to me this type of project should include China and likely will. There will likely be strong commercial participation.

    ...hopefully.
    Do not see China joining during Trump's presidency. But as the time line for a space station around the moon is mid 2020s to end 2020s it could happen.

    Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  13. #73
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,712
    The partners of the ISS had high level talks on Deep Space Gateway in Japan.

    http://www.popularmechanics.com/spac...s-tokyo-talks/

    Top NASA officials and their partners in the International Space Station program gathered in Tokyo this past Friday and Monday, Popular Mechanics has learned, for behind-closed-doors talks on the next big step in human spaceflight: the lunar orbiting station. Officially known as the Deep Space Gateway, or DSG, the modular outpost will occupy an egg-shaped orbit around the moon in the 2020s, when it replaces the ISS and becomes the main destination for astronauts and cosmonauts.

    Although all partners generally agree on the idea of the DSG, the exact design and use of the future outpost is still up for debate. NASA hoped to use the outpost as a springboard for missions to Mars, while others are pushing for the exploration of the lunar surface. These diverse goals will be hard to reconcile in one space station because of technical and financial differences and limitations.
    Russia has also been looking at other options post ISS

    http://www.moondaily.com/reports/Rus...going_999.html

    Russia is set to spend the next decade working on a potential new station that might be built if the International Space Station (ISS) project is terminated, as well as a spacecraft capable of making trips to the Moon, General Designer of Russia's Manned Programs Yevgeny Mikrin said Tuesday.

    The ISS participants have agreed to maintain the program until 2024, but it is unclear what will happen afterward. In April last year, Igor Komarov, director general of the Russian national space agency, Roscosmos, said the Russian side was open to extending the program until 2028. However, no final decision has been made on the future of the project. The participants include Russian, US, Japanese, European and Canadian space agencies.

    "If the decision is made to stop the work of the ISS, a Russian station may be set up... It is planned to include five modules," Mikrin said at the Academic Space Conference in Moscow.

    The station would be able to house a crew of three and it would weigh about 60 tonnes, that is, almost seven times less than the ISS.

  14. #74
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,712
    Well looks like NASA and their partners are going for a Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway. This will happen in the 2020s. Just as China will be going to the moon the old fashioned way. Unless they can hasten the development of the LM9. I expect ESA and Russia to have one foot in each camp.

    http://www.moondaily.com/reports/NAS...Space_999.html

    As NASA sets its sights on returning to the Moon, and preparing for Mars, the agency is developing new opportunities in lunar orbit to provide the foundation for human exploration deeper into the solar system. For months, the agency has been studying an orbital outpost concept in the vicinity of the Moon with U.S. industry and the International Space Station partners. As part of the fiscal year 2019 budget proposal, NASA is planning to build the Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway in the 2020s.

    The platform will consist of at least a power and propulsion element and habitation, logistics and airlock capabilities. While specific technical and mission capabilities as well as partnership opportunities are under consideration, NASA plans to launch elements of the gateway on the agency's Space Launch System or commercial rockets for assembly in space.

  15. #75
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,712
    Farewell NASA's Deep Space Gateway and welcome Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway. What you might say! It is the same but we have a new administration

    http://www.planetary.org/blogs/jason...k-details.html

    Remember NASA's Deep Space Gateway? The proposed miniature space station in lunar orbit that will serve as a training ground for deep space, and a waypoint for surface missions? Our next big step for the human exploration of the solar system? The project I wrote a big piece on last year, titled NASA unveiled new plans for getting humans to Mars, and hardly anyone noticed?

    Well, in NASA's new budget proposal, the Deep Space Gateway is gone! It has been replaced with something called the Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway... which is actually just the Deep Space Gateway, with a different name. In other words, the DSG is now LOP-G. It’s a stealth re-brand!

    When I asked NASA headquarters why the name changed, a representative said they chose Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway because it's more descriptive, and that they're still planning on coming up with a better name.

  16. #76
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,712
    NASA received 190 abstracts when it requested the global science community to submit ideas leveraging the gateway in lunar orbit to advance scientific discoveries. They have now invited scientists and engineers to a workshop to learn more about their ideas.

    https://www.nasa.gov/feature/scienti...-near-the-moon

    NASA is looking at how the Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway can create value for both robotic and human exploration in deep space.

    In late 2017, the agency asked the global science community to submit ideas leveraging the gateway in lunar orbit to advance scientific discoveries in a wide range of fields. NASA received more than 190 abstracts covering topics human health and performance, Earth observation, astrophysics, heliophysics, and lunar and planetary sciences, as well as infrastructure suggestions to support breakthrough science.

    Although it is too early to select specific research for the gateway, the workshop marks the first time in more than a decade the agency’s human spaceflight program brought scientists from a variety of disciplines together to discuss future exploration.

    “We are in the early design and development stages for the gateway, and we were curious about the level of interest in using this platform for science including the scale and scope of instrumentation scientists might want to see onboard,” said Jason Crusan, director, Advanced Exploration Systems at NASA Headquarters in Washington. “We were impressed by the breadth of the abstract responses and invited scientists and engineers to a workshop to learn more.”

  17. #77
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,712
    Green light from the Trump administration in the latest for the a cislunar space station program.

    https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2018...idents-budget/

    The Trump Administration is proposing to formally start a cislunar space station program and begin assembly early in the next decade with launch of the first element. The Power and Propulsion Element (PPE) is the core module of the station, now named the “Lunar Orbital Platform – Gateway” (LOP-G).

    As a part of commercial space industry initiatives for human exploration, the Fiscal Year (FY) 2019 NASA budget request submitted by the President to Congress in February also proposed an accelerated, dedicated commercial launch of the PPE in 2022.

    The PPE was previously scheduled to launch as a secondary payload on Exploration Mission-2 (EM-2), which is currently planned to be the first crewed Orion spacecraft mission launch on NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket. With the PPE no longer on the EM-2 manifest, NASA is evaluating changes to that mission, including aspirations of flying the Habitation module on a more ambitious flight for Orion’s first crew.

  18. #78
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,712
    Latest The Space Review has a very negative opinion on the Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway.

    http://www.thespacereview.com/article/3494/1

    A consensus has developed for crewed lunar return. The Trump Administration has made it their official policy, Congress seems supportive, and other countries, who have never been to the Moon, are eager to take part in this program.

    Two components have emerged in NASA’s plans to return to the Moon. The first is to establish a human tended space station in lunar orbit. Originally called the Deep Space Gateway, this program was renamed the Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway (LOP-G) by the Trump Administration. The second component is to return humans to the surface of the Moon and establish a lunar base. Thus far NASA has been short on details regarding the latter.

    But can we afford to do both components? The answer is a resounding no! Returning humans to the lunar surface is the primary goal of the Trump Administration and is the consensus goal. It is a goal that will inspire the public and the next generation of scientists and engineers. LOP-G is an unneeded and costly diversion that should be promptly relegated to the dustbin of history.

  19. #79
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,712
    This week's The Space Reviewee covers the pro and cons of having the Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway (LOP-G).

    http://www.thespacereview.com/article/3502/1

    The Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway (LOP-G), despite its inelegant name, has been described by its proponents as the next reasonable step in human exploration of the Moon and Mars. We have been to the Moon before without a gateway station, so it isn’t an absolute must for returning to the Moon. Several practicable Mars mission architectures have been proposed leaving from low Earth orbit, so it is not an indispensable option to put humans on Mars.

    The technical justification—not to be confused with the political justification—for LOP-G comes down to whether or not there is a greater value in having a lunar gateway than just going back to the lunar surface in a manner similar to what was proposed in the Constellation program. It is not a simple question to answer.

    LOP-G, if it goes forward, will live in the political reality that SLS, Orion, and the International Space Station do. All three have become large jobs program in addition to any other benefits that they provide. It is unlikely that any of these three programs are going away soon. The Senate is balking at ending or commercializing the ISS in 2025. The programs provide a lot of very good jobs in the states and districts of very powerful members of Congress. It would be political suicide for members from these places to allow these programs to end. Their existence leaves limited money for developing new systems.

    When making any tough decision it is useful to make a list of pros and cons and then weight them to come up with a good opinion. I am going to go through what I consider to be valid factors in such a decision.

  20. #80
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,712
    NASA expects its 1st element for the Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway, the Power and Propulsion Element (PPE), to be ready for launch in 2022. No dates yet for the other elements of the Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway.

    http://spacenews.com/nasa-to-request...r-this-summer/

    NASA now expects to release a draft request for proposals for the first element of the proposed Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway this summer, several months later that previously planned.

    In an update posted on the Federal Business Opportunities website May 31, NASA said it expects to release the draft solicitation for the Power and Propulsion Element (PPE) of the Gateway in June or July, followed by an industry day at the Glenn Research Center. The update didn’t state when a final solicitation would be released, but said NASA expected final proposals to be due in November.

    In the previous formal update about the PPE program, posted to the same website in February, NASA said it was expecting to release a draft solicitation in April, with proposals due in late July. The agency didn’t explain the delayed schedule for the PPE program in its statement.

    The PPE is the first element of the Gateway, providing power for later elements as well as electric propulsion. NASA plans to later add to the Gateway modules for habitation and logistics, as well as an airlock and docking ports for visiting Orion spacecraft. The Gateway is intended to support future robotic and crewed missions to the lunar surface as well as build up experience for future human missions to Mars.

  21. #81
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,712
    "Koichi Wakata, JAXA vice president and astronaut, helps chart future of ISS and human space exploration"

    https://spacenews.com/jaxa-astronaut-charts-future/

    Koichi Wakata, the Japanese space agency’s vice president and director general for human spaceflight technology, is intimately familiar with the International Space Station. As an astronaut, he helped assemble the space station in 2000 and lived onboard for four months in 2009 and six months in 2013 and 2014. Now, Wakata leads JAXA’s preparation for the eventual transition from a single government owned and operated outpost to one or more new stations in low Earth orbit (LEO). Wakata spoke with SpaceNews correspondent Debra Werner during the ISS Research & Development conference in San Francisco June 23-26.

  22. #82
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,712
    'Microgravity entrepreneurs eager to know what comes after ISS'

    https://spacenews.com/microgravity-b...s-uncertainty/

    [QUOTE]It’s a tricky time for entrepreneurs whose businesses rely on the International Space Station.

    Uncertainty over the timing of the orbiting outpost’s retirement and the eventual transition to one or more new platforms is making it challenging for companies to attract investors and plan for the future.

    Part of the confusion stems from President’s Trump’s budget proposal to halt direct U.S. government funding of ISS after 2024. Speakers at the ISS Research & Development conference here July 23 to 26 emphasized the need for ongoing human activity in low Earth orbit and said the fate of ISS will be determined by its international partners: the United States, Canada, Japan, the Russian Federation and the European Space Agency’s 11 member states.

    Even the United States has not completed a roadmap for its future in low Earth orbit.[QUOTE]

  23. #83
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    10,929
    I wonder if this may play a role:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interim_Control_Module

    That might make a good Lunar gateway coreblock--and it was "placed in a caretaker status at NRL's Payload Processing Facility in Washington, D.C. Should it become necessary to complete and launch ICM, it is estimated that it would take between two and two-and-a-half years to do so."

    "Since the ICM was mothballed, a variety of new uses for it have been proposed. Most seriously, it was proposed for use as part of a robotic servicing mission for the Hubble Space Telescope before the final Shuttle servicing mission was approved. The ICM has also been suggested as an integral part of a new telescope based on unused spy satellite hardware,[6] and even for use in its original role in the event of removal of the Russian Orbital Segment of the ISS."

  24. #84
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    248
    "it would take between two and two-and-a-half years"

    I'd be surprised if it took so little time. Also, newer rockets can/will accommodate wider payloads. I think this is a significant consideration for such a payload.

  25. #85
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,712
    Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway to have a moon manned lander, courtesy of Japan.

    https://japantoday.com/category/tech...ed-lunar-craft

    JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) has announced that it is planning to build the first manned Japanese lunar aircraft in history. JAXA will collaborate with the plans of American and European space agencies, aiming to start production in 2020. Ideally the finished aircraft will head for the moon 10 years later.

    According to the proposed plans, the "lander" (device responsible for anchoring to the moon’s surface) will be developed by Japan and will look a bit like a table with four legs. It will be jettisoned from a space station orbiting the moon (that one’s NASA’s responsibility, a follow-up to the International Space Station forecast to launch in 2022).
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  26. #86
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,712
    "NASA updates Lunar Gateway plans"

    https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2018...gateway-plans/

    NASA management updated the agency’s human exploration plans for the 2020s to the NASA Advisory Council’s (NAC) Human Exploration and Operations (HEO) Committee last month at the Ames Research Center in California. The focus of the evolving plans for the next decade is launch, assembly, and operations of a human-tended space station in high lunar orbit.

    Separate modules of the lunar gateway are planned to be launched to the Moon beginning in 2022, and NASA provided the latest look at the pieces and a forecast of their launch schedule. A commitment of funding for the gateway project is still forthcoming, but the Power and Propulsion Element (PPE) is the module that would launch first.

    NASA plans to award contracts to one or more of the commercial bidders early next year to build, launch, and demonstrate an electric propulsion spacecraft that meets requirements for a Gateway PPE. After a one-year demonstration period, NASA would then exercise a contract option to take over control of the spacecraft.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •