Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234
Results 91 to 100 of 100

Thread: NASA's moon exploration ambitions

  1. #91
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    7,014
    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    Selvaarchi, a better headline might be "Advisory group wants NASA to accelerate lunar plans". As they say in the news biz, you buried the lead.

    And it's no surprise that members of the group want NASA to move faster; the ones making the most noise are former astronauts and a NASA administrator (Griffin). I'd be curious to hear comments from some of the other members.
    You are right only but for the moment (I hope temperraly) I can not concentrate for too long. So have taken the easy way out by coping the headlines of the articles.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  2. #92
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    7,014
    NASA defends its choice of using the Gateway to explore the moon.

    https://spacenews.com/is-the-gateway...y-to-the-moon/

    Sometime in 2028, competing for attention alongside a presidential election and the return of the Summer Olympics to Los Angeles, NASA will return humans to the surface of the moon.

    A lunar lander will depart the cluster of modules in an elliptical orbit around the moon, called Gateway, and descend. One stage will take the lander to a low lunar orbit and then separate, after which the descent module will handle the rest of the journey to the lunar surface. A crew of up to four will spend days — perhaps up to two weeks — on the surface before boarding the ascent module, which will take them back to the Gateway.

    At least that’s NASA’s plan for now. A year after President Donald Trump formally directed NASA to return humans to the moon in Space Policy Directive (SPD) 1, the agency has developed the outlines of a plan to carry that out, while emphasizing the language in the policy to do so in a “sustainable” manner and with international and commercial partners. But as the agency describes two of the biggest elements of the plan, the Gateway and a “human-class” lunar lander, it’s still struggling to sell the proposal to its various stakeholders, including its own advisers.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  3. #93
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    7,014
    A Op-ed in spacenews agrees with NASA's approach of using Commercial Lunar Payload Services (CLPS).

    https://spacenews.com/op-ed-clps-wil...lunar-economy/

    In early September, NASA released the Commercial Lunar Payload Services (CLPS) solicitation, to acquire end-to-end commercial payload services to the lunar surface and announced Nov. 29 the winners of nine indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity contracts entitling them to bid for future delivery jobs. NASA’s quick turn on this procurement demonstrates a seriousness to the potential investors, this is positive for future companies seeking investment for lunar related endeavors.

    The winning companies include a mixture of traditional aerospace and new entrants; Lockheed Martin, Astrobotic, Moon Express, Masten Space Systems, Deep Space Systems, Draper, Firefly Aerospace, Intuitive Machines, and Orbit Beyond were all selected.

    The goal of CLPS is to provide NASA with annual missions to the lunar surface delivering at least 10 kg of NASA payload before Dec. 31, 2021. The release of Space Policy Directive 1 (SPD-1) in December 2017 directed the U.S. civil space program to pursue a sustainable program of exploration with a near-term emphasis of returning humans to the moon. NASA’s approach to CLPS fits directly in line with SPD-1 and more importantly it is truly commercial in nature whereby it directs the contractor to provide all activities to safely integrate, accommodate, transport, and operate NASA payloads using contractor-provided assets, including launch vehicles, lunar lander spacecraft, lunar surface systems, Earth re-entry vehicles and associated resources.

    Unlike some past commercial procurements CLPS is a welcome change to NASA’s procurement approach because NASA is not the only viable customer, it does not restrict a providers’ business model, allows for additional payload sales and other revenue streams not available under a standard government procurement. It is not hard to envision monetizing the branding of a lunar rover and its subsequent forays on the lunar surface. NASA’s approach to CLPS sets the stage for the lunar economy because it will spur investment in CLPS and other commercial provided lunar system capabilities. Several existing as well as new commercial entities will likely be competing to provide routine services to the lunar surface.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  4. #94
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    875
    "The goal of CLPS is to provide NASA with annual missions to the lunar surface delivering at least 10 kg of NASA payload before Dec. 31, 2021."
    I'm underwhelmed by this bid goal.

  5. #95
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    7,014
    The debate between using SLS and commercial options to explore the moon -

    https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/o...ck-to-the-moon

    Mark Whittington’s Jan. 4 op-ed ( “NASA wants to go back to the Moon the hard way”) questioned NASA’s strategy of building an orbiting lunar space station before establishing a base on the Moon’s surface. His piece concludes with a broad swipe at NASA’s Space Launch System, currently under development, and advocating cancellation of the project in favor of commercial launch providers.

    Doing so at this time would put the United States at serious risk of failing to meet its stated objectives in both manned and unmanned space exploration, precisely at a time when other nations are undertaking bold new initiatives in space.

    Critics of the SLS have focused on its sticker price and a price-per-pound comparison relative to reusable rockets. As former senator and astronaut Harrison Schmitt noted last year, that argument fails to consider the real requirements of a deep space mission.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  6. #96
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    7,014
    "NASA’s Campaign to Return to the Moon with Global Partners"

    https://www.nasa.gov/feature/nasa-s-...lobal-partners

    The Moon is a fundamental part of Earth’s past and future - an off-world location that may hold valuable resources to support space activity and scientific treasures that may tell us more about our own planet. Americans first walked on its surface almost 50 years ago, but the next wave of lunar exploration will be fundamentally different.

    Through an innovative combination of missions involving commercial and international partners, NASA’s robotic lunar surface missions will begin as early as 2020, focus on scientific understanding of lunar resources, and prepare the lunar surface for a sustained human presence, to include the use of lunar oxygen and hydrogen for future lunar vehicles. The lunar surface will also serve as a crucial training ground and technology demonstration test site where we will prepare for future human missions to Mars and other destinations.

    Since the beginning of its mission, NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) has imaged objects impacting the surface of the moon. Such observations are of interest scientifically since they allow NASA to test and constrain models used to understand how water and other volatiles may be transported to the permanently shadowed craters near the lunar poles.

    In the coming months, the first Israeli spacecraft will land on the Moon, and partnership with NASA has helped make this possible. NASA will not only help with observations from LRO and communications support during the mission, but has also developed a laser retroreflector that will fly onboard the Israeli lander.

    This past month, NASA held discussions with the China National Space Administration (CNSA) to explore the possibility of observing a signature of the landing plume of their lunar lander, Chang’e 4, using LRO’s LAMP instrument. For a number of reasons, NASA was not able to phase LRO’s orbit to be at the optimal location during the landing, however NASA was still interested in possibly detecting the plume well after the landing. Science gathered about how lunar dust is ejected upwards during a spacecraft’s landing could inform future missions and how they arrive on the lunar surface.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  7. #97
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    11,084
    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    The debate between using SLS and commercial options to explore the moon -

    https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/o...ck-to-the-moon
    I like the option of telepresence. Having infrastructure is more than flags and footprints.

  8. #98
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    7,014
    Leonard David highlights two NASA reports on Luna exploration with the participation of commercial companies.

    http://www.leonarddavid.com/nasa-and...o-new-reports/

    Renewed interest in exploration of the Moon has the potential to benefit lunar science greatly and could evolve into a program facilitated by partnerships between commercial companies and NASA’s Science Mission Directorate (SMD).

    That’s the view of companion reports issued today by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  9. #99
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    436
    Eric Berger of Ars reports SpaceX will bid a reusable crew lunar lander for NASA's Commercial Lunar Payload Services, including LOP-G <--> surface. No word on if it's Starship or Starship derived.

    https://twitter.com/SciGuySpace/stat...67722415456257
    Last edited by docmordrid; 2019-Feb-12 at 07:39 AM.

  10. #100
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    7,014
    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    Leonard David highlights two NASA reports on Luna exploration with the participation of commercial companies.

    http://www.leonarddavid.com/nasa-and...o-new-reports/
    Ars Technica has more details of NASA's plans.

    https://arstechnica.com/science/2019...unar-landings/

    For two years, the Trump administration has made various noises about returning humans to the Moon. There have been bill signings with Apollo astronauts such as Buzz Aldrin and Harrison Schmitt. Vice President Mike Pence has traveled to NASA facilities around the country to make speeches. And the president himself has mused about the Moon and Mars.

    However, beyond talk of returning humans to the Moon, much of the country's civil space policy and budgeting priorities really hadn't changed much until late last week. On Thursday, NASA released a broad agency announcement asking the US aerospace industry for its help to develop large landers that, as early as 2028, would carry astronauts to the surface of the Moon.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •