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Thread: Asteroid mining

  1. #151
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    Sep 2004
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    South Carolina
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    The dwarf planet/giant asteroid Ceres has volcanos, and at least one of them might still be active. Happy landings!

    https://phys.org/news/2019-06-gravit...-volcanic.html
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  2. #152
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    The largest (and only) asteroid mining company in the United Kingdom is off and running.

    https://www.digitaltrends.com/cool-t...n-feasability/
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  3. #153
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    This article on "wrinkling" on Ceres implies that Ceres experiences earthquakes.

    https://phys.org/news/2019-07-eviden...wrinkling.html
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  4. #154
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    Jan 2014
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    Klang, Malaysia
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    7,351
    This report makes the case for space-based asteroid tracking telescope. If it does get approved, it will be a major asset that can be used by future space mining companies.

    https://spacenews.com/report-makes-c...ing-telescope/

    A report last month has buoyed the efforts of scientists seeking a dedicated mission to search for near Earth objects, although NASA has yet to commit to funding that mission.

    The June 19 report by a National Academies committee concluded that a space-based infrared telescope is the best way to meet a goal established by Congress more than a decade ago of identifying all the potentially hazardous near Earth objects (NEOs) at least 140 meters in diameter.

    “After hearing from representatives of different organizations, including persons who had sought to develop alternative proposals for both ground- and space-based NEO detection systems, the committee concluded that a space-based thermal-infrared telescope designed for discovering NEOs is the most effective option for meeting the George E. Brown Act completeness and size requirements in a timely fashion (i.e., approximately 10 years),” the report stated. The George E. Brown Act is a section of the 2005 NASA authorization act that directed NASA to detect at least 90 percent of NEOs at least 140 meters across by the end of 2020.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  5. #155
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    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
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    The USA is looking to mine rare earth metals from the moon.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2019/07/18/nasa...-the-moon.html

    On the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission to the moon, the leader of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration gave his predictions for the future of the space industry and how it could be a lucrative enterprise much sooner than most investors think.

    NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said, for example, that harvesting rare-earth metals from the surface of the moon will be possible in “this century.”

    “There could be tons and tons of platinum group metals on the moon, rare-earth metals, which are tremendously valuable on Earth,” Bridenstine told CNBC’s “Squawk Alley” on Thursday.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

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