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Thread: Another space race?

  1. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    It is a different perspective on the news and as such worth reporting.

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    Sigh...Sputnik News misinforms the ignorant.

  2. #92
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    Time line of USA and China space programme.

    http://www.latimes.com/world/asia/la...htmlstory.html

    "The first true rocket was fired by China in 1232, during a war with the Mongols. But by the time the Soviet Union and the United States pioneered modern space exploration in the 1950s and í60s, China was largely out of the game. When the United States landed a man on the moon almost half a century ago, China was mired in political turmoil. The country didnít send an astronaut into space until 2003.

    But now itís catching up."

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  3. #93
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    We have been reading about how China is playing catch up with Russia and the USA.

    Now Russia can see them in their review mirror. In another 5 years if China can successfully pull of their robotic missions to the moon and Mars, as well as their space station I would put them ahead of Russia. Even now China has more operating satellites than Russia.

    http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/1071421.shtml

    "China's achievements in the space industry in the past five years prove the nation can independently develop its own space technology, and Western countries which used to prevent cooperation with China may think twice, experts said.

    They said the breakthroughs in the space industry include the heavy-lift rocket, lunar exploration, BeiDou Navigation Satellite System, and Micius quantum satellite and space station.

    "These breakthroughs prove that China can develop its own independent space strategy and is shortening the gap with the other two major space powers, US and Russia. In some areas China has even surpassed them," Song Zhongping, a military expert who served in the PLA Rocket Force, told the Global Times on Sunday."

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  4. #94
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    Hmm. I don't quite get how at times you decry the space race and yet you forever vaunt China's climb within that context. Whatever, it is unimportant.

    The Space Race as per the 1960s USA vs Russia and others is dead. A more important race is for $/payload. SpaceX seems way ahead but others from around the world will follow. Expect cheaper and more powerful payloads from private concerns.

    Gubbernints still have big space budgets and will continue to be important, as in so many other fields. They will also have the most dangerous military stuff. The race for the best robots in space will be won by the entrepreneurs.

    YMMV

  5. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by 7cscb View Post
    Hmm. I don't quite get how at times you decry the space race and yet you forever vaunt China's climb within that context. Whatever, it is unimportant.

    The Space Race as per the 1960s USA vs Russia and others is dead. A more important race is for $/payload. SpaceX seems way ahead but others from around the world will follow. Expect cheaper and more powerful payloads from private concerns.

    Gubbernints still have big space budgets and will continue to be important, as in so many other fields. They will also have the most dangerous military stuff. The race for the best robots in space will be won by the entrepreneurs.

    YMMV
    American private enterprise will certainly play an important role in the next few years. If NASA does focus on the moon I hope to see positive developments there.

    In the mean time ESA moon village will take shape with contributions from China, Japan, Russia and India.

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  6. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    American private enterprise will certainly play an important role in the next few years. If NASA does focus on the moon I hope to see positive developments there.

    In the mean time ESA moon village will take shape with contributions from China, Japan, Russia and India.

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    No. I am saying American private enterprise is setting the pace of the space race. Competitors from around the world will surely arise. Government's role is changing and being eclipsed by commercial interests.

  7. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by 7cscb View Post
    No. I am saying American private enterprise is setting the pace of the space race. Competitors from around the world will surely arise. Government's role is changing and being eclipsed by commercial interests.
    I think India will still give American private enterprise a run for their money. Chandrayaan II mission to cost US93 million including rocket and launch.

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  8. #98
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    This article has a more military bent but it does contain the number of operation satellites the US (803), China (204), Russia (142), and India (104) have as of August this year.

    The US is still far ahead of the others but the gag has been narrowing. Surprised to see China well ahead of Russia.

    http://www.straitstimes.com/world/un...-in-space-race

    "The United States needs to undertake an urgent revamp of its space strategies and rethink its investment priorities as part of a move to counter threats from rising space powers, particularly China, a US official has said.

    "The threats are moving fast and we need to stay ahead of it," Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defence for Space Policy Stephen Kitay told the journal SpaceNews in his first media interview since taking office in May."

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  9. #99
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    The USA House Armed Services emerging threats and capabilities subcommittee was told of China's advances in space technology. In some areas they they are already equal or more advanced than the US (remember the pitch here is also to get additional budgets to invest in space).

    http://spacenews.com/in-space-and-cy...united-states/

    At the Tuesday hearing, Subcommittee Chairman Rep. Elise Stefanik, R-N.Y., said lawmakers are not entirely convinced that China’s dominance in many technology sectors is a “foregone conclusion.” But the committee does believe that China’s technological accomplishments should inform U.S. policies and defense investments.

    “China continues to increase their research and development investments at an alarming pace and is rapidly closing many of their technology gaps,” Stefanik said. “More and more, we see China using only domestic Chinese firms and creating high market access barriers to support domestic capacity.”

    This has obvious national security implications, she said, “should they corner the market on advanced technologies critical to national security.”

  10. #100
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    China concedes it has a long way to go to catch up with the USA in space exploration.

    http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/1088610.shtml

    "China has a lot of catching up to do with the US on space technology because it was late in the game and only a few of its private companies have such a mature technology, Chinese experts said after the successful launch of the SpaceX Falcon Heavy on Tuesday.

    According to media reports, the Falcon Heavy can carry a payload of 16.8 tons to Mars.

    This shows China still lags far behind the US on space technology, because our most recently launched Long March-5 can only carry a payload of 25 tons into low Earth orbit, Huang Hai, vice president of Beihang University's School of Astronautics, told the Global Times."

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  11. #101
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    Expected articles talking of America's advances in space after SpaceX success with Falcon Heavy. Was not disappointed. Here are three of them.

    http://www.jhunewsletter.com/article...the-space-race

    n this feature, we explore how space science research has been and still is associated with both absurdity and great power competition. We delve into the roots of rocketry in war, the space race between the U.S. and the USSR, and what some consider to be the beginnings of a second space race between the U.S. and China. Through this piece, we hope to shed light on the nature of international competition and cooperation in space.
    http://thehill.com/opinion/national-...more-than-mars

    SpaceX has reached another milestone with the successful launch of Falcon Heavy. The launch is another example of the organization’s persistent ability to innovate and push market expansion.

    In the short term, the launch probably won’t add to SpaceX’s bottom line all that much, there just isn’t enough heavy lift demand. So why is the launch such a big deal? The importance of Tuesday’s maiden Falcon Heavy flight is less about the immediate financial return for SpaceX and more about what it signifies vis-ŗ-vis America’s interest in space and the country’s ability to leverage the free market system to develop the burgeoning space domain ahead of our peers.

    Maintaining America’s advantage in space has both economic and national security implications.
    http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2018/...-in-space.html

    Additionally, The Wall Street Journal article noted that the successful test flight could mean the Falcon Heavy could start making paid missions to space within months. The National Space Council should nurture this possibility and quickly create a system that could help support as many U.S.-led launches into space as possible. Only this will create the environment necessary to establish a thriving U.S.-led business ecosystem.

    If the U.S. does not do this, our competitors will. A future where China or Russia dominates in space is not a safe, secure or prosperous future for America.
    Last edited by selvaarchi; 2018-Feb-10 at 08:47 AM.

  12. #102
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    Quora has a discussion piece "Can China win a space race to Mars against USA? Can trump cause such a race?"

    https://www.quora.com/Can-China-win-...se-such-a-race

    So many many variables play into this, it's hard to say. The easy part to answer is that no, trump could not spark such a race. There is no “space race” anymore, and it would take a lot more than Number 45 talking smack, or even Congress directing (and funding!) NASA to send human explorers to Mars ASAP, to “ignite a space race to Mars” between the USA and China.

    First of all, despite some encouraging Chinese successes, their space technology still lags well behind American space technology. Sure, they are catching up, but they have several important milestones to achieve before they have “space operations competence” to match either Russia or America.

    Those milestones— like a successful human orbital mission (launch, orbital insertion, re-entry, landing), successful EVA missions in orbit, successful craft rendezvous in orbit, berthing & docking their Chinese craft with the ISS (berthing is easier!), a long-duration orbital mission (perhaps at a higher orbit), a human cislunar mission (around the moon & back, or to a Lagrange point and back, etc), a satellite rendezvous, a NEO rendezvous (even with a robotic craft, doesn't need to be human-piloted)… all these are not merely ribbons to pin on someone's chest. They require a space agency to develop not just tech but operational experience doing difficult things in space. This is the kind of operational experience China will need to successfully send taikonauts to Mars.

  13. #103
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    USA sees China as their main competitor in space. This according to the latest US National Space Council meeting.

    http://spacenews.com/council-discuss...osed-by-china/

    A panel discussion on national security space at the Council’s Feb. 21 meeting at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center focused primarily on the growing capabilities of, and the growing threat posed by, China’s space efforts, including the development of counterspace capabilities that could disrupt American space systems in the event of a conflict.

    “Russia and China are each developing counterspace capabilities to use during a potential future conflict with the United States to reduce U.S. and allied advantage and effectiveness, eroding our information advantage,” said Susan Gordon, principal deputy director of national intelligence.

    She singled out China’s “impressive rise — and it is impressive — as a space power,” citing a more than ten-fold increase in number of operational satellites since 2000 and development of advanced technologies, such as tests of quantum satellite communications.

    “China has the best politically supported and best resourced foreign space program that we have seen in many years,” she said. “Its years of intense activity are beginning to bear fruit.”
    Andrew Jones take on the US National Space Council meeting.

    https://gbtimes.com/us-space-policy-...nd-opportunity

    A public meeting of the White House National Space Council on commercial space and regulatory reform held on February 21 saw divergent views on how to react to the rise of China's space programme.

    The event was held at NASA’s Kennedy Space Centre in Florida and chaired by Vice President Mike Pence.

    While the main issues were commercial space business and innovation and the related regulatory regime, highlighted by SpacePolicyOnline.com, the matter of potential engagement with, and threats and opportunities from, the increasingly comprehensive and capable Chinese space programme, emerged as a key issue, as reported by SpaceNews.com.
    Last edited by selvaarchi; Today at 03:35 PM.

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