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Thread: Middle-aged kit building

  1. #331
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    Quote Originally Posted by captain swoop View Post
    ...

    Shrubbery is some kind of plant ...

    ...
    You must fetch another shrubbery!!!



    [I have to cut this kind of stuff out!]

  2. #332
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    This is the kit by Bronco, gun and carrier are also available as separate items.
    All the etched parts are included.
    I have some pictures of the gun build somewhere.
    Seated crew figures have been put aside for use with a different kit.

    https://www.emodels.co.uk/bronco-mod...pdr-35188.html
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  3. #333
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    This is going to be the specific P-47 Thunderbolt that lost power on take-off and ground-looped at Akyab, 2nd May 1945, with my father inside it.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    A slightly pebble-dashed cockpit, unfortunately - my airbrush pressure was too high, for reasons I don't understand. I decided to press on, rather than try to remove the offending Alclad undercoat.
    And the harness is a bit rubbish - a neoprene add-on, which looked promising, but which rips apart when you try to remove the paper backing, and is too thick if you leave the paper backing in place.

    Apart from that, things are going great.

    Grant Hutchison
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  4. #334
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    I like how the head cushion - or whatever it's called - has a scuffed look.

  5. #335
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    Some old pictures I recently posted on a different forum in a thread discussing tank design and development

    Israeli M-51 'Super Sherman' a 'cast hull' Sherman M4A1 'big hatch' with HVSS Armour, a new diesel engine and a heavily rebuilt turret to take a 105mm gun. Academy Kit plus some extras.



    Sherman M4a3 'big hatch' with HVSS Suspension and 76mm Turret. the final WW2 and Korean war version of the Sherman.. Tasca Kit built more or less right out of the box.

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  6. #336
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    Quote Originally Posted by captain swoop View Post
    You sure that's not a regular Sherman 76mm gun, tricked out with Oddball's 90mm "stovepipe"?



  7. #337
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    I like how the head cushion - or whatever it's called - has a scuffed look.
    Only successful bit of weathering in that cockpit, unfortunately.
    The Tamiya aluminium acrylic paint I used to dry-brush scuff marks on to the green cockpit paint turned out to contain freakishly large pigment flakes, so it ended up looking like someone spilled sequins in there, dammit. I'll go back to Humbrol enamel for the exterior.

    Grant Hutchison
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    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  8. #338
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    Quote Originally Posted by captain swoop View Post
    Some old pictures I recently posted on a different forum ...
    Nice. Your weathering is always excellent. I like the dusty upper surfaces - how did you do that?

    Grant Hutchison
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  9. #339
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    I expect this video of the 2018 IPMS winners may be old hat to you ardent modelers, but I found it quite fascinating, especially the scratch-built model of the Kriegsfischkutter in 1/72 scale.
    Last edited by schlaugh; 2018-Oct-19 at 03:08 PM.

  10. #340
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    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    I expect this video of the 2018 IPMS winners may be old hat to you ardent modelers, but I found it quite fascinating, especially the scratch-built model of the Kriegsfischkutter in 1/72 scale.
    "3.7 millimeter forward gun". Might work if the model is 1/10 scale....
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  11. #341
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    Looking at these pictures... I can almost smell the frock, varnish and paint. The smell of victory!
    Solfe

  12. #342
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    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    Looking at these pictures... I can almost smell the frock, varnish and paint. The smell of victory!
    "Smell the frock"? That's ... alarming.
    What do you mean by "frock"?

    Grant Hutchison
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  13. #343
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    "Smell the frock"? That's ... alarming.
    What do you mean by "frock"?
    Flocking? as in adding bits of scale grasslike stuff to simulate grass? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flocking_(texture)
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  14. #344
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Flocking? as in adding bits of scale grasslike stuff to simulate grass? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flocking_(texture)
    I always though the item was "frock" and the action of using it was "frocking".
    Solfe

  15. #345
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Flocking? as in adding bits of scale grasslike stuff to simulate grass? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flocking_(texture)
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    "Smell the frock"? That's ... alarming.
    What do you mean by "frock"?

    Grant Hutchison
    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    I always though the item was "frock" and the action of using it was "frocking".
    Oh my god. I just realized I misspelled the same word over and over again, the exact same misspelling each time. L not R!
    Solfe

  16. #346
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    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    Oh my god. I just realized I misspelled the same word over and over again, the exact same misspelling each time. L not R!
    Perhaps you're living in a Benny Hill sketch. ("How rong is it since you had an election?")
    Bad ruck if so.

    Grant Hutchison
    Last edited by grant hutchison; 2018-Oct-21 at 01:37 AM.
    Blog

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  17. #347
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    Just finished modelling the Pratt & Whitney R-2800 Double Wasp engine for my P-47 - or at least the front half of it, the remainder being hidden inside the cowling.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    The ignition harness is a photoetched detail from Eduard. Hooking that up was a test for steady hands.

    Grant Hutchison
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    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  18. #348
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    For shame! Model the whole thing even if it won't be seen! After all, you know it's there!

    Oh, and are those inches or centimeters on your Olfa mat? Is that a UK penny? I guess I could look up the diameter....

    Oh, and it's absolutely lovely!

    ETA: 20.3mm. So the Olfa grid is 10mm and the engine is a little over an inch in diameter. I think.

    A little off topic: We live about halfway between Seattle and Victoria, BC, as the seaplane flies. They fly rather low, as sightseeing is a major part of the brief journey. Some of the planes are DeHaviland (Canada) Beavers, some are Otters. The Otters are turbines, but the Beavers all have round engines. I just love hearing them go over.
    Last edited by Trebuchet; 2018-Oct-25 at 12:50 AM.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  19. #349
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    Thanks. Yes, one-centimetre squares on the cutting mat.

    Never been in a Beaver, but I flew in the right-hand seat of an Otter once, into the short runway at Puerto Williams. Gad, when the pilot put the flaps down I felt like I was dangling from my harness directly over the numbers on the runway - that plane does a heck of a steep approach.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  20. #350
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    Quote Originally Posted by captain swoop View Post
    Some old pictures I recently posted on a different forum in a thread discussing tank design and development

    Israeli M-51 'Super Sherman' a 'cast hull' Sherman M4A1 'big hatch' with HVSS Armour, a new diesel engine and a heavily rebuilt turret to take a 105mm gun. Academy Kit plus some extras.



    Sherman M4a3 'big hatch' with HVSS Suspension and 76mm Turret. the final WW2 and Korean war version of the Sherman.. Tasca Kit built more or less right out of the box.

    HVSS Suspension above, not armour of course!
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  21. #351
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Only successful bit of weathering in that cockpit, unfortunately.
    The Tamiya aluminium acrylic paint I used to dry-brush scuff marks on to the green cockpit paint turned out to contain freakishly large pigment flakes, so it ended up looking like someone spilled sequins in there, dammit. I'll go back to Humbrol enamel for the exterior.

    Grant Hutchison
    Tamiya Acrylic is rubbish for anything but airbrushing in my experience.
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  22. #352
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    Quote Originally Posted by captain swoop View Post
    HVSS Suspension above, not armour of course!
    I'm no expert on Sherman variants but I know my way round the basics, I stared and stared thinking "That's just a basic cast hull surely?". Lovely models as always.

  23. #353
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    Starting to look like an aeroplane, at long last.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    SEAC stripes aren't as much of a pain as D-Day stripes, but they're still a pain.

    Grant Hutchison
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    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  24. #354
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    And here she is, HB981 attached to 135 Sq. RAF, looking as much like her appearance on the morning of 2nd May 1945 as I've been able to reconstruct. That was when she lost power on take-off from Akyab Main, ground-looping off the end of the runway and trying quite hard to kill my father in the process. He was (up to that point) on his way south to support the Operation Dracula landings, and sporting huge drop tanks so that the squadron could provide a "cab rank" service in support of the ground forces (lingering on site and strafing on request).

    I have a photograph of what she looked like on 3rd May, but it's not much help (the photograph had its own adventures, you'll see, but that's my father standing on the wing root):
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    Possibly the most drab Jug ever modelled, but what can I say - the Royal Air Force and the South East Asia Command weren't keen on jazzing things up:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Grant Hutchison
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    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  25. #355
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    And here she is, HB981 attached to 135 Sq. RAF, looking as much like her appearance on the morning of 2nd May 1945 as I've been able to reconstruct. That was when she lost power on take-off from Akyab Main, ground-looping off the end of the runway and trying quite hard to kill my father in the process. He was (up to that point) on his way south to support the Operation Dracula landings, and sporting huge drop tanks so that the squadron could provide a "cab rank" service in support of the ground forces (lingering on site and strafing on request).

    I have a photograph of what she looked like on 3rd May, but it's not much help (the photograph had its own adventures, you'll see, but that's my father standing on the wing root):


    Possibly the most drab Jug ever modelled, but what can I say - the Royal Air Force and the South East Asia Command weren't keen on jazzing things up:

    Grant Hutchison
    Looking at that photo I am surprised that your father survived the crash. It would have taken more than just a bit of buffing out.

    It almost seems as the RAF in the South East Command was trying to live up to the perception about this area of conflict being "forgotten" by omitting to supply sufficient paint for their aircraft. Looking at your model I was puzzled at first by the lack of "red" in the RAF markings until I remembered, correctly I think, that it had been removed because of the propensity for a certain allied air force to shoot at anything with a red "circle" on the wings.

  26. #356
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    Looking at that photo I am surprised that your father survived the crash. It would have taken more than just a bit of buffing out.
    These flying fuel tanks did tend to catch fire when they crashed, but his didn't. He ascribed that to: a) his turning off the fuel pump while he was still in the air, so that the propeller's windmilling cleared the hot engine of fuel; and b) both wings coming off during the ground loop, taking the drop tanks with them. Aware of the fire risk, he popped out of the aircraft fairly quickly after it came to rest, ran a few steps, and then went back to get his parachute (because it was a chargeable offence to lose one). Then he jogged back to the end of the runway, put the parachute on the ground, sat on it, and "enjoyed the morning air".

    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    It almost seems as the RAF in the South East Command was trying to live up to the perception about this area of conflict being "forgotten" by omitting to supply sufficient paint for their aircraft. Looking at your model I was puzzled at first by the lack of "red" in the RAF markings until I remembered, correctly I think, that it had been removed because of the propensity for a certain allied air force to shoot at anything with a red "circle" on the wings.
    Paint shortages were a problem, but, yes, the red dot on the roundel was omitted to avoid confusion with the Japanese hinomaru. The US had already removed the red dot from the centre of their white star insigne, for the same reason. There was endless fiddling around to try to reduce friendly fire incidents: during the Torch landings, the US put yellow rings around their roundels so as to match the RAF; in the Pacific, the RAF, RAAF and RNZAF added bars to their roundels to match the American pattern.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  27. #357
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    These flying fuel tanks did tend to catch fire when they crashed, but his didn't. He ascribed that to: a) his turning off the fuel pump while he was still in the air, so that the propeller's windmilling cleared the hot engine of fuel; and b) both wings coming off during the ground loop, taking the drop tanks with them. Aware of the fire risk, he popped out of the aircraft fairly quickly after it came to rest, ran a few steps, and then went back to get his parachute (because it was a chargeable offence to lose one). Then he jogged back to the end of the runway, put the parachute on the ground, sat on it, and "enjoyed the morning air".

    Paint shortages were a problem, but, yes, the red dot on the roundel was omitted to avoid confusion with the Japanese hinomaru. The US had already removed the red dot from the centre of their white star insigne, for the same reason. There was endless fiddling around to try to reduce friendly fire incidents: during the Torch landings, the US put yellow rings around their roundels so as to match the RAF; in the Pacific, the RAF, RAAF and RNZAF added bars to their roundels to match the American pattern.

    Grant Hutchison
    He does seem to have been very lucky indeed.With regard to the parachute, the mind does funny things in moments of stress.

    I had never heard about the addition of bars but was able to find photos of a RNZAF Corsairs with said bar painted on and descriptions of RAF planes sometimes having the bar. Plus, I can find photos of Fleet Air Arm planes with the bar. However, I am struggling to find a photo of a RAAF plane with them. There are lots of photos of Liberators, Spitfires, Boomerangs, Mustangs, Wirraways, Mosquitos etc all without the red dot but no bars. I am now intrigued.

  28. #358
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    He does seem to have been very lucky indeed.With regard to the parachute, the mind does funny things in moments of stress.
    It's interesting to me that he was sitting on it, but not attached to it. I'm not sure what Regulations would say about that, but pilots in Burma seem to have gone off-book in lots of ways, often with the aim of keeping cool (or perhaps marginally less hot).

    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    I had never heard about the addition of bars but was able to find photos of a RNZAF Corsairs with said bar painted on and descriptions of RAF planes sometimes having the bar. Plus, I can find photos of Fleet Air Arm planes with the bar. However, I am struggling to find a photo of a RAAF plane with them. There are lots of photos of Liberators, Spitfires, Boomerangs, Mustangs, Wirraways, Mosquitos etc all without the red dot but no bars. I am now intrigued.
    My memory may be faulty. It's a long time since I read about the bars.

    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  29. #359
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    Some better pictures. (The original post used my "just in case I drop it" images, but the patterned green cutting board is something of a distraction.)
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    Grant Hutchison
    Blog

    Note:
    During life, we all develop attitudes and strategies to make our interactions with others more pleasant and useful. If I mention mine here, those comments can apply only to myself, my experiences and my situation. Such remarks cannot and should not be construed as dismissing, denigrating, devaluing or criticizing any different attitudes and strategies that other people have evolved as a result of their different situation and different experiences.

  30. #360
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Some better pictures. (The original post used my "just in case I drop it" images, but the patterned green cutting board is something of a distraction.)
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    Grant Hutchison
    really impressive!
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

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