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Thread: Middle-aged kit building

  1. #31
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    The models that I assembled as a kid -- rarely planes, most often monsters and super-hero figurines -- looked awful and were unstable, because I rushed things and got sloppy. I wouldn't wait for the glue or the paint to dry. Ultimately, we blew these up with firecrackers, and good riddance to 'em.

    When my young son showed an interest in building these things, I helped him, figuring that with decades of maturity on my side, I'd do better. Wrong: I was just as impatient and reckless. No firecrackers this time, but my results were substandard. The ones he did by himself were far better. (They had this new, "safety" glue that didn't hold anything together. We had to go back to the old, pungent, lethal kind.)

    I helped him assemble a U.S.S. Enterprise that turned out okay, though the engines kept falling off. I finally filled the hull with foam and put some rods in there to provide support, and that did nicely. Darn design was never meant to survive in a a gravitational field like ours.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by baskerbosse View Post
    A couple of years ago I did a couple of paper models like this one, which I quite liked. Free models are available on the internet. Just download and print.

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    Very nice.
    I had my attempt a few years ago with a paper NC-1701, and posted here.
    As per that discussion, I have more respect for someone who can make the paper look like something real.

    I've never been good with models. But; a few years ago, I wanted a good feel for the difference in sizes of rockets, so I bought a suite of same scale rockets.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Not very good for a model maker, but I am happy nonetheless. (The LM is in there with legs folded if you can see it)

  3. #33
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    Hey, does anyone build their own from scratch?


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    18" long,
    articulated and synchronized solar arrays (They swivel as pairs about 70 degrees in any direction) Optional cargo pod, removable landing gear, detachable command section. Even the laser turrets were articulable.
    Original version lit it with 'grain-o-rice' lights (this is v2, rebuilt decades later).
    Loooots of parts on there you'd recognize if you looked real close. (You might recognize the spine from a Space:1999 Eagle, and the air-breathing engines are ventolin puffers. I still have boxes full of tiny cast off bits of plastic and metal)

    Had fun shooting it too, back in the day. Used my Pentax K1000 and inserted an artificial aperature made of a pinhole in a piece of tinfoil. I calculated an F-stop of approx. 300. This gave me huge depth-of-field, as well as allowing me to get extremely close (0.0" to be exact. My camera lens was in contact with the nose of the craft and it was still in-focus). Still got that pic around here somewhere.

    This was all back in early Star Wars the days when I dreamed of joining John Dykstra and his ilk at ILM. Does the nose resemble a Y-wing fighter just a bit? Maybe...
    Last edited by DaveC426913; 2015-Sep-25 at 11:01 PM.

  4. #34
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    I've sort of returned to styrene modeling as a stress reducer, and enjoyed sharing some construction with Younger Son (we have a box with a 1/350 scale TOS Enterprise just awaiting him being home from college long enough - our plan did not include figuring out where to put the thing when complete). Stopped at a hobby shop in Nashville yesterday after visiting a sick relative, and I was amused to note that I, a few days past birthday 58, was probably the youngest of 3 customers in that aisle.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveC426913 View Post
    Hey, does anyone build their own from scratch?
    I did some similar mash-up work when I was student moving out of the parental home - I was presented with a box containing my old aircraft models, in various states of disrepair.
    I created an object that combined the glasshouse from a Blohm & Voss Bv 141 with the rear engine pods of a VC10, and the twin booms and tail assembly of something or other I can't now remember. It looked ... remarkable.

    Grant Hutchison

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I've just moved to a machine from which I can access your build log. That's a beautiful kit, beautifully built.

    Grant Hutchison
    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    Echoed. Although not my primary interest, I love the aircraft of that era and the "old world" craftsmanship many displayed. You've captured that craftsmanship with exquisite detail, baskerbosse.

    I built a few ships, too, including the Cutty Sark. My best though was the Thermopylae...The Revell 1/70th, I think.
    Thanks guys! Although Wingnut Wings does make it much easier to do a good job. The moulding details are excellent and the fit is perfect. The tricky bit is the rigging.

    Grant, -I think I got it. Captain Scarlet, isn't it?

    Cheers!
    Peter

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by NEOWatcher View Post
    Very nice.
    I had my attempt a few years ago with a paper NC-1701, and posted here.
    As per that discussion, I have more respect for someone who can make the paper look like something real.

    I've never been good with models. But; a few years ago, I wanted a good feel for the difference in sizes of rockets, so I bought a suite of same scale rockets.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Not very good for a model maker, but I am happy nonetheless. (The LM is in there with legs folded if you can see it)
    Looks great!
    I looked up the paper build thread, good first effort on that Enterprise.
    Much better than my first effort, -a Back to the Future DeLorean that got so badly warped during assembly that it was impossible to complete! :-(
    The link in there to the airliner build discussed in the thread was amazing.
    I have a build log for the Soyuz as well: http://jenssenpapermodels.blogspot.c...196-scale.html

    /Peter

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by baskerbosse View Post
    Grant, -I think I got it. Captain Scarlet, isn't it?
    Thanks, that helped. But unfortunately, I never saw the series so it didn't bring back anything because I didn't know it in the first place. I did watch Thunderbirds though from time to time.
    As above, so below

  9. #39
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    Yes, it's the Angel Interceptor from Captain Scarlet, 1/72 kit by Airfix.
    The Airfix cockpit detail is non-existent, so I'm using a resin add-on that provides a rather nice cockpit tub and a distinctly husky-looking Angel pilot.

    In other news, I've just managed to generate a slight pebble-dash effect on the upper surfaces of the model - that's what I get for not changing the filter on my spray booth often enough. I'd normally just give that a gentle fine sanding and it would be right as a trivet, but this kit is so old it has raised panel lines. I don't think I can bear to sand them off and rescribe the whole model.
    <Sigh.>

    Grant Hutchison

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    I would enjoy building models again - planes, ships, tanks, etc. - but I don't have any special urge to display them, nor do we really have the room. (And I don't have a man cave.) ...
    Me, too. They were fun to build and to look at after building, but what do you do with them?

    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    ... For me, the big problem with doing these intricate models when you're older is failing eyesight. ...
    Actually, that should be a plus. If you mess up, you can't tell.
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  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    Actually, that should be a plus. If you mess up, you can't tell.
    You don't understand. We. Just. Know.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    You don't understand. We. Just. Know.
    That was explained to me by a friend many many years ago. He built a VW Beetle. Lots of detail on the engine, then the body went on and the engine was out of sight. I couldn't understand why the engine was even there.

    But (to use your phrasing). He'd. Know.
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.

  13. #43
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    Most of the stuff I built , some from plans, some kits, and some original designs ...were flown , and flown well.
    Remember folks, " Balsa Flies Better !!!! "

    Dan

  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by pzkpfw View Post
    I couldn't understand why the engine was even there.

    But (to use your phrasing). He'd. Know.
    Or...the model might allow display with the bonnet open...and he would just know.

    It's a condition that plagues me at times and I have to remind my wife about why I sometimes obsess over little details that no one but me will take notice of. The most recent was my hall table project. While there is a practical benefit to applying finish to all exposed wood surfaces, even if hidden, I applied all of it with the same care. I could have just slapped it on in the concealed areas but it would have haunted me.
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  15. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    It's a condition that plagues me at times and I have to remind my wife about why I sometimes obsess over little details that no one but me will take notice of. The most recent was my hall table project. While there is a practical benefit to applying finish to all exposed wood surfaces, even if hidden, I applied all of it with the same care. I could have just slapped it on in the concealed areas but it would have haunted me.
    What condition?

  16. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by ngc3314 View Post
    I've sort of returned to styrene modeling as a stress reducer, and enjoyed sharing some construction with Younger Son (we have a box with a 1/350 scale TOS Enterprise just awaiting him being home from college long enough - our plan did not include figuring out where to put the thing when complete). Stopped at a hobby shop in Nashville yesterday after visiting a sick relative, and I was amused to note that I, a few days past birthday 58, was probably the youngest of 3 customers in that aisle.
    Suggestion from a ship modeling fiend: build a case for it first. It will cost more then the model (yes, I know how much the E costs), and it will be a nuisance to build, and it will be worth it in both the short and long term.
    Last edited by John Mendenhall; 2015-Oct-03 at 06:48 AM. Reason: typo

  17. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    ... sometimes obsess over little details that no one but me will take notice of...
    This. Guy. obsesses over details:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=54D0_rr-7Dk
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/lucaia...7632208677161/

    The rest of us are rank amateurs.
    Last edited by DaveC426913; 2015-Oct-01 at 02:12 AM.

  18. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    Or...the model might allow display with the bonnet open...and he would just know.

    It's a condition that plagues me at times and I have to remind my wife about why I sometimes obsess over little details that no one but me will take notice of. The most recent was my hall table project. While there is a practical benefit to applying finish to all exposed wood surfaces, even if hidden, I applied all of it with the same care. I could have just slapped it on in the concealed areas but it would have haunted me.
    Well, the whole interior is represented in the WnW kit. Most is not visible when it's completed.
    Some years a go I read an article by someone building a model of the Royal Yacht Caroline.
    All internal timbers were represented, royal cabins had exquisite parquet flooring made with miniature wooden inlays using many different kinds of wood.
    Much of this was closed up, never to be seen again. He had the same comment. "-I know it is there".

    I'd say it's partly the enjoyment of creating it in the first place, partly the "I know it's there", but it also changes what the object is.
    That Royal Caroline for example is an exact miniature replica. If you were to take it apart, it's consistent all the way through.
    The difference between gold plating and solid gold if you like.

    /Peter

  19. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by pzkpfw View Post
    That was explained to me by a friend many many years ago. He built a VW Beetle. Lots of detail on the engine, then the body went on and the engine was out of sight. I couldn't understand why the engine was even there.

    But (to use your phrasing). He'd. Know.
    Another example (I deny everything, not even owning this kit) - loads of interior detail in a big kit of a Tu-160 which is then covered by fuselage skin and bulkheads. (The magazines were off-kit additions, but a nice touch).

    But you'd still know. And have the pictures taken during construction. Much better than the phase when I'd ask the merest of acquaintances to admire the control panel barely visible through the open hatch of a 1/24 Gemini capsule.

  20. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveC426913 View Post
    Hey, does anyone build their own from scratch?
    I collect old pens--bits of plastic--and accumulate model kits. I need to get to building.

    is that a sewing foot you used as a landing skid?

  21. #51
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    Do you guys build kits as they come, or do you "kitbash"? That is, make then into something they weren't quite intended to be?

    When I was somewhat interested in model railroading, I used to read Model Railroader magazine occasionally. They had a feature called the "Dremel Kitbashing Award", for people who'd started out with a kit and made it into something else. They had one for a specific railroad loco in "twelve inches to the foot scale". They'd taken an actual loco from another railroad and modified to look as if it was one of their own.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  22. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by publiusr View Post
    I collect old pens--bits of plastic--and accumulate model kits. I need to get to building.

    is that a sewing foot you used as a landing skid?
    Landing gear I built myself.
    Last edited by DaveC426913; 2015-Oct-02 at 11:41 PM.

  23. #53
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    Hi Treb, Part of the fun and education in building and "Flying" is to learn how to build for strength, weight and durability, just like Mr. Dorfman's
    " The Real Thing " . When you get a 6 foot sail plane that comes in a box the size of a pound of spaghetti , it's bound to be a little delicate.
    When the wing folds in half on the tow line, it's back to the building board for reinforcing and "Improving" the design. This works .
    Some people throw their plane in the trash. A determined model aircraft builder learns from the experience and presses on , so as to apply what you learn throughout your building career . It leads to stronger trebuchets

    Dan

  24. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by danscope View Post
    Hi Treb, Part of the fun and education in building and "Flying" is to learn how to build for strength, weight and durability, just like Mr. Dorfman's
    " The Real Thing " . When you get a 6 foot sail plane that comes in a box the size of a pound of spaghetti , it's bound to be a little delicate.
    When the wing folds in half on the tow line, it's back to the building board for reinforcing and "Improving" the design. This works .
    Some people throw their plane in the trash. A determined model aircraft builder learns from the experience and presses on , so as to apply what you learn throughout your building career . It leads to stronger trebuchets


    Dan

    I spent too much time at the airplane factory. Quality is King, but Light is God.*

    *That's actually a paraphrase from what everyone know at that company: Quality is King, but The Schedule is God.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  25. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Do you guys build kits as they come, or do you "kitbash"? That is, make then into something they weren't quite intended to be?
    Minor kitbashing. Custom decals I print myself, different paint jobs, a little scratch building, some resin & metal detailing.
    I'll usually convert to something slightly different from what the kit manufacturer provided, and will try to correct any errors in the original kit.

    Grant Hutchison

  26. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Do you guys build kits as they come, or do you "kitbash"? That is, make then into something they weren't quite intended to be?
    Yes. I've done everything from as they come, minor kitbashing, major kitbashing, and built from scratch. Even if I don't do serious kitbashing, I will almost always paint and detail with my own touches.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  27. #57
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    Schedule has slipped a little - the decalling took three days.
    I quite like kits with very detailed decal sheets, but there's no way I can do the whole kit at one sitting. Experience has proved that if I push on with it, at some critical point I'll find a previously placed decal from the other side of the kit stuck to my thumb.
    So it was one surface at a time, coat with Microsol, and let set overnight.
    All done and rinsed now. Couple of coats of varnish to seal, and then I have some matt black detailing to do.

    Grant Hutchison

  28. #58
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    Since I gave up railway modelling the forums seem to be full of descriptions of CAD printed parts. Modelling might be a completely different ball-game once everyone has a 3D printer.

  29. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by eburacum45 View Post
    Since I gave up railway modelling the forums seem to be full of descriptions of CAD printed parts. Modelling might be a completely different ball-game once everyone has a 3D printer.
    Yes, I think 3D printing will put a lot of the small-scale resin detailing producers out of business. Some of the photo-etched metal (the flat objects that are folded into 3D shapes) will go the same way.

    Grant Hutchison

  30. #60
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    Used to do some model building in the past. My brother and I still have a lot of railroad stuff in boxes, and he is about to have a large attic available... most recent scale building I did was last year a wooden castle for my youngest. Who is still way too young to play with wooden castles. Anyway, cutting out hundreds of angles on the top of the walls was not fun. the result was nice though, so worth it. These days my models are on scale 1:1. Rebuilding the car for vintage rally demonstrations.

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