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Thread: So, Apparently, we are not Doomed (Yellowstone)

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by danscope View Post
    Hi Geonuc, The Caldera under Yellowstone is about the size of Rhode Island. And there's not much of a cindercone left.
    The caldera remains....lurking below. Look up " Caldera volcano " .
    Thanks, I don't need to look anything up. I'll just refer to what I learned in volcanology class during my geology degree program.

  2. #32
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    danscope: Magma chamber? Magma reservoir? Hotspot? They lie below Yellowstone (and the Yellowstone Caldera).

    Image from Huffington Post: Vast Chamber Of Molten Rock Discovered Under Yellowstone ‘Supervolcano’
    Last edited by 01101001; 2016-Mar-21 at 01:43 AM. Reason: fix url
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    Skepticism enables us to distinguish fancy from fact, to test our speculations. --Carl Sagan

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    earlier activity was in Idaho.
    Craters of the moon in Idaho is still throwing up cinder cones, within the last 2000 years. So things haven't entirely moved on.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    Thanks, I don't need to look anything up. I'll just refer to what I learned in volcanology class during my geology degree program.
    To be fair, passing a degree program is no guarantee of knowledge. I have a friend with a geology degree who doesn't believe in climate change, and doesn't even believe that there's enough ice in the ice sheets to raise sea level by more than a few inches, much less over 200 feet.
    Et tu BAUT? Quantum mutatus ab illo.

  5. #35
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    Sure, but I bet he knows the definition of "caldera."
    _____________________________________________
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  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by grapes View Post
    I've pointed this out for the past twenty years--three major eruptions starting at 2000kya, another at 1300kya, and another at 600kya

    Sure, we're due, in another 100 thousand years. If it hasn't been slowing down...
    There are error bars on those dates. From what I've read and watched, you are correct that the next eruption may be +/- 100 y from now. The article is interesting and I know the USGS has seismic monitoring stations all over the area attempting to monitor the magma chamber, growth and temperature, whether or nor crystal formation is a true identification remains to be seen.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Squink View Post
    Craters of the moon in Idaho is still throwing up cinder cones, within the last 2000 years. So things haven't entirely moved on.
    Mostly by chance, we visited Craters of the Moon and Hawaii Volcanoes National Park in the same year a while back. More vegetation had regrown in Hawaii in 20 years than in Idaho in 2000. Rain does make a big difference!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ara Pacis View Post
    To be fair, passing a degree program is no guarantee of knowledge. I have a friend with a geology degree who doesn't believe in climate change, and doesn't even believe that there's enough ice in the ice sheets to raise sea level by more than a few inches, much less over 200 feet.
    Of course not, but as Gillianren implied, it's a pretty good bet that someone with a geology degree can correctly identify and define the big parts on a volcano. I generally don't have much to add to the scientific discussions on CQ - I learn far more than I contribute - but I'm not going to let bogus incorrect geology information stand when we have a member asking for help with the subject.

    Sorry about your friend, but I bet he or she probably knows what a caldera is, too. Climate change is a slightly more advanced concept.
    Last edited by geonuc; 2016-Mar-21 at 11:56 AM. Reason: Poor word choice

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by grapes
    I've pointed this out for the past twenty years--three major eruptions starting at 2000kya, another at 1300kya, and another at 600kya

    Sure, we're due, in another 100 thousand years. If it hasn't been slowing down...
    There are error bars on those dates. From what I've read and watched, you are correct that the next eruption may be +/- 100 y from now. The article is interesting and I know the USGS has seismic monitoring stations all over the area attempting to monitor the magma chamber, growth and temperature, whether or nor crystal formation is a true identification remains to be seen.
    Yes, the dates are not an exact time table. However, just based on those dates, the next is 100,000 years from now. Not sure how it could be a minus 100 years from now.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by grapes View Post
    Not sure how it could be a minus 100 years from now.
    Time Lord!
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  11. #41
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    Just in passing , from encyclopedia.com :
    A caldera is a large, usually circular depression at the summit of a volcano . Most calderas are formed by subsidence or sinking of the central part of the volcano; a rare few are excavated by violent explosions.

    Craters and calderas are distinct structures. Both are circular depressions at the tops of volcanoes, but a crater is much smaller than a caldera and is formed by the building up of material around a vent rather than by the subsidence of material below a cone.

    A volcano's summit may subside in two ways. First, eruptions of large volumes of pumice or magma , or subterranean drainage of the latter to other areas, may empty a chamber beneath the volcano into which a portion of the cone collapses. Second, the summit of the volcano may act as a thin roof over a large magma chamber that breaks under its own weight and sinks, partly or wholly, into the magma beneath. The term cauldron is sometimes reserved for calderas formed by the foundering of a cone summit in underlying magma.

    The largest volcanic structures in the world are resurgent calderas. Resurgent calderas form following intense volcanic eruptions comparable in violence to asteroid impacts. (None has occurred during historical times.) During such an eruption, vast ejections of volcanic material—in some cases, thousands of cubic miles of pumice and ash—excavate very wide underground chambers, much wider than the volcano itself. Large calderas, up to hundreds of square miles in extent, collapse into these chambers. After settling, the caldera floor resurges or bulges up again, lifted by the refilling magma chamber below. Is in the case of the 22 mile (35 km) wide Cerro Galan caldera in Argentina, which is visible as a whole only from orbit, resurgence has raised the center of the caldera to almost a mile (1500 m) above the point of lowest subsidence. "
    Of course, there is more in the article.
    To be fair, most volcanoes are NOT of this type, but as for the really dangerous ones.... er..yes.
    Like Toseek says....." Most of what I know is through googling " .

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by grapes View Post
    Yes, the dates are not an exact time table. However, just based on those dates, the next is 100,000 years from now. Not sure how it could be a minus 100 years from now.
    Yes the minus was impossible, what I meant to say that it could be less than 100 k y with the error bars, perhaps much less.

  13. #43
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    Please make it after our visit next June.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Please make it after our visit next June.
    You mean after you get the Nimitz Greybooks sorted.

  15. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noisy Rhysling View Post
    You mean after you get the Nimitz Greybooks sorted.
    That's going to take a good deal longer.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  16. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Please make it after our visit next June.
    I visited Yellowstone every year until I was about 11-12(back in the 50's), it was a great place to explore and wonder what was happening. Have fun!

  17. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    I visited Yellowstone every year until I was about 11-12(back in the 50's), it was a great place to explore and wonder what was happening. Have fun!
    Me too, grew up in Billings. Continued until my late teens and have been back quite a few times since, including last June. We actually had reservations at the Old Faithful Inn in early September 1988. That got cancelled....
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  18. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    That got cancelled....
    Kinda like the pine beetles, but 20 years early.
    They bulldozed my favorite campground at Rocky Mountain park after the trees all died.
    Crater lake is starting to look a little ragged as well.

  19. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Me too, grew up in Billings. Continued until my late teens and have been back quite a few times since, including last June. We actually had reservations at the Old Faithful Inn in early September 1988. That got cancelled....
    They put those fires out as quickly as possible back then, than the biologists cried foul. One tree, I don't remember which one requires fires for the pine cone to open and release seeds, so in a way fires are good, but the perfect storm got them that year. I moved away from Wyo. in 69, and haven't been back since.

  20. #50
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    Grew up in Greybull WY and Lewistown MT in 50's also. Been to yellowstone many times a year. Winter is especially beautiful. The most dangerous thing there are trees falling during high winds

  21. #51
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    BTW, Harry Turtledove wrote a good trilogy on a Yellowstone eruption (except I think he exaggerated the duration of the volcanic winter).

  22. #52
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    Anybody seen this? From the smithsonian?
    http://volcano.si.axismaps.io/
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  23. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    Anybody seen this? From the smithsonian?
    http://volcano.si.axismaps.io/
    Interesting animation. For the first twenty years (1960-1979) I was wondering why they even had an icon for emissions (there are none depicted). Maybe that's when they first started collecting data?

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