Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 53

Thread: So, Apparently, we are not Doomed (Yellowstone)

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    1,970

    So, Apparently, we are not Doomed (Yellowstone)

    New ‘geospeedometer’ confirms super-eruptions have a short fuse
    “The hot spot under Yellowstone National Park has produced several super-eruptions in the past. The measurements that have been made indicate that this magma body doesn’t currently have a high-enough percentage of melt to produce a super-eruption. But now we know that, when or if it does reach such a state, we will only have a few hundred years to prepare ourselves for the consequences,”
    It all has to do with measuring the size and shape of the melt inclusions in magma suspended quartz crystals.
    You can tell the time between inclusion formation and eruption, by looking at the size and shape of the inclusions.
    Turns out that for massive eruptions, it's usually only a couple hundred years.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Durham
    Posts
    160
    Although it is off-topic. To answer the subject.

    Yes we are doomed.

    Pollution.

    rmfr
    Difference between a "best" friend and a good friend: A good friend will come down and bail you out of jail. A Best friend will be in jail with you saying, "Dude, we screwed up."

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Bend, Oregon
    Posts
    6,148
    My interpretation of the article is that we are still doomed. If our response to climate change is any indication, having several hundred years advance warning of a supervolcano eruption will not be enough.

    Interesting research.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    36,941
    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    My interpretation of the article is that we are still doomed. If our response to climate change is any indication, having several hundred years advance warning of a supervolcano eruption will not be enough.
    We have only had evidence of climate change since the 1950s, not several hundred years.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Bend, Oregon
    Posts
    6,148
    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    We have only had evidence of climate change since the 1950s, not several hundred years.
    Perhaps you missed the sarcasm.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    36,941
    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    Perhaps you missed the sarcasm.
    Yes, I did. What indicators were there?
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    1,970
    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    My interpretation of the article is that we are still doomed.
    I like to take my dooms one at a time, rather than all bundled up.
    Each has a special kind of horror that's worth savoring.

    Yeah, interesting research. It'd never have occurred to me to look at included blebs like that, but then I didn't do a PhD in geology either.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    4,758
    So it's not going to haooen for a while.

    Wait, what was that rumble I just felt?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    R.I. USA
    Posts
    10,014
    There is no such thing as an extinct volcano. And life is quite tenuous when near a super volcano.

    "Wait......maybe they're right. Maybe....we should study these things with an eye to caution, pool our sources of learning and get a better handle on
    such dangerous places. Maybe....................... Nah !!!!! " Steve Martin

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    14,424
    It'd better hold off until after next June. We've already got reservations.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    93
    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    My interpretation of the article is that we are still doomed. If our response to climate change is any indication, having several hundred years advance warning of a supervolcano eruption will not be enough.

    Interesting research.
    Exactly.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    93
    Quote Originally Posted by danscope View Post
    There is no such thing as an extinct volcano. And life is quite tenuous when near a super volcano.

    "Wait......maybe they're right. Maybe....we should study these things with an eye to caution, pool our sources of learning and get a better handle on
    such dangerous places. Maybe....................... Nah !!!!! " Steve Martin
    Throw that life inside the volcano, than we will see if it will still be alive-ooops, nope it would not be alive, it would be destroyed inside the volcano-where lava kills everything and everyone-when it comes to life.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    8,186
    I've pointed this out for the past twenty years--three major eruptions starting at 2000kya, another at 1300kya, and another at 600kya

    Sure, we're due, in another 100 thousand years. If it hasn't been slowing down...


    Quote Originally Posted by GrapesOfWrath View Post
    I didn't watch it, what does it say?

    By coincidence, 700,000 years is roughly the time between the great eruptions of the Yellowstone caldera--2 million years ago, 1.3 mya, and 0.6 mya. So, anytime soon!

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    R.I. USA
    Posts
    10,014
    I certainly hope you are right,Sir. We've all bet the farm

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    2
    You're still doomed. You just won't all meet your doom at the same time or in the same way.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    26,634
    Quote Originally Posted by grapes View Post
    I've pointed this out for the past twenty years--three major eruptions starting at 2000kya, another at 1300kya, and another at 600kya
    Those happen too frequently though. If you want the real killers, look for the things that happen every 10-100 million years!

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    R.I. USA
    Posts
    10,014
    There are many indeed who would allow that Yellowstone is a very serious killer as it were. Maybe not as exciting as the stuff one gets in
    science fiction , but never the less a disturbing reality.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    14,424
    WE'RE ALL GONNA DIE!!!!

    Eventually.

    We don't know what of, but most likely it won't be Yellowstone, an asteroid, or Planet X. Cancer, car wrecks and heart attacks are more likely. Yellowstone is one of my favorite places on earth. It's not worrying me.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Halifax, Nova Scotia
    Posts
    3,177
    There is one in Italy and a bunch of others...Japan, etc... YouTube will enlighten you on doom.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    location
    Posts
    12,410
    So, if it takes <500 years from crystal growth state in new magma, and present uplift at Yellowstone indicates new magma, does this suggest a super-eruption within the next 500 years?
    Et tu BAUT? Quantum mutatus ab illo.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    1,628
    Quote Originally Posted by danscope View Post
    There is no such thing as an extinct volcano.
    Depends on the definition. Volcano can move off the vent and become inert. So, is the mound of lava we see on the surface the volcano or is the vent beneath it the volcano?

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    R.I. USA
    Posts
    10,014
    The " Caldera " beneath it is the real heart of the volcano. The ash cone is superfluous until it ruptures (Mt St Helens)
    when the release of it's products .

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    1,628
    Quote Originally Posted by danscope View Post
    The " Caldera " beneath it is the real heart of the volcano. The ash cone is superfluous until it ruptures (Mt St Helens)
    when the release of it's products .
    Then we could have old volcanoes that haven't moved and new volcanoes that appear when the old cones move off the vent? Just trying to get it straight in my head. I'm not a vulcanologist. I have lived on the side of an active volcano, Mt. Etna, and that got me interested.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    36,941
    Quote Originally Posted by Noisy Rhysling View Post
    Then we could have old volcanoes that haven't moved and new volcanoes that appear when the old cones move off the vent? Just trying to get it straight in my head. I'm not a vulcanologist. I have lived on the side of an active volcano, Mt. Etna, and that got me interested.
    Yes. Think of the Hawaiian island chain, a line of volcanic sea mountains of diminishing size as you go east to west; as the sea bed moves over a hot spot, it grows newer and bigger islands, which eventually erode away.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    1,628
    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    Yes. Think of the Hawaiian island chain, a line of volcanic sea mountains of diminishing size as you go east to west; as the sea bed moves over a hot spot, it grows newer and bigger islands, which eventually erode away.
    Until you get to Midway.

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Bend, Oregon
    Posts
    6,148
    Quote Originally Posted by danscope View Post
    The " Caldera " beneath it is the real heart of the volcano. The ash cone is superfluous until it ruptures (Mt St Helens)
    when the release of it's products .
    The caldera is the 'volcanic crater' formed by the eruption(s). It is not beneath the volcano.

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Bend, Oregon
    Posts
    6,148
    Quote Originally Posted by Noisy Rhysling View Post
    So, is the mound of lava we see on the surface the volcano or is the vent beneath it the volcano?
    Yes. The lava hill or mountain on the surface (often but not always cone-shaped), the vent (if active) and the magma chamber below all form the volcano system. However, the surface features (i.e., the cone or mountain) are what is commonly referred to as the volcano.

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    R.I. USA
    Posts
    10,014
    Hi Geonuc, The Caldera under Yellowstone is about the size of Rhode Island. And there's not much of a cindercone left.
    The caldera remains....lurking below. Look up " Caldera volcano " .

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    15,801
    I'm stuck on "under". How far below Yosemite do you feel the caldera is lurking?

    Caldera

    A caldera is a cauldron-like volcanic feature on large central volcanoes, a special sort of volcanic crater (from one to several kilometers in diameter), formed when a magma chamber was emptied.
    Is the Yellowstone Caldera rim not in view?

    Edit to answer my own question: Wikipedia: Yellowstone Caldera has a picture at the top of the aricle with "the caldera rim in the distance".
    Last edited by 01101001; 2016-Mar-19 at 09:30 PM.
    0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 ...
    Skepticism enables us to distinguish fancy from fact, to test our speculations. --Carl Sagan

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    14,424
    Quote Originally Posted by 01101001 View Post
    I'm stuck on "under". How far below Yosemite do you feel the caldera is lurking?

    Caldera



    Is the Yellowstone Caldera rim not in view?

    Edit to answer my own question: Wikipedia: Yellowstone Caldera has a picture at the top of the aricle with "the caldera rim in the distance".
    Yup. When we were there last summer, we passed several signs reading "Caldera Rim". And the hotspot has moved over time -- earlier activity was in Idaho.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •