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Thread: American human space capsule

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    In a few hours President Trump is due to give a speech at Kennedy Space Center. Hope is he will announce America's return to the moon.

    https://www.wired.com/2017/02/trump-...ongress-might/

    "ON SATURDAY AFTERNOON inside a hangar at the Melbourne International Airport in Florida, President Trump will hold a campaign-style rally for supporters. That same morning (if all goes as scheduled), about an hour away at the Kennedy Space Center, SpaceX will launch its Falcon 9 commercial crew rocket from Launchpad 39A—the historic site of so many Apollo liftoffs decades ago.

    Coincidence? Perhaps.

    Saturday’s visit puts the president into the orbit of the nascent commercial space industry, and one giant leap away from the hallowed ground of NASA’s glory days. In fact, some space enthusiasts even hope he’ll use the rally to announce a mission to the moon."


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    Disappointed that there was nothing on the space programme in the President's speech. Wonder if it that was because NASA had advised the risk is too high to include astronauts in the 1st flight of SLS.

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  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    Disappointed that there was nothing on the space programme in the President's speech. Wonder if it that was because NASA had advised the risk is too high to include astronauts in the 1st flight of SLS.

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    NASA is studying its options.

    https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2017...maiden-flight/

    "With NASA’s management officially informing the workforce that evaluations are taking place into installing a crew on to the first flight of the Space Launch System (SLS), the challenge of ensuring crew safety will gain additional focus. Without an uncrewed test flight, a modification to the Exploration Mission -1 (EM-1) profile is likely, ranging from documented options such as a hybrid profile through to an ISS crew run."


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  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    NASA is studying its options.

    https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2017...maiden-flight/

    "With NASA’s management officially informing the workforce that evaluations are taking place into installing a crew on to the first flight of the Space Launch System (SLS), the challenge of ensuring crew safety will gain additional focus. Without an uncrewed test flight, a modification to the Exploration Mission -1 (EM-1) profile is likely, ranging from documented options such as a hybrid profile through to an ISS crew run."


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    A panel of experts have cautioned NASA on having humans on SLS first flight.

    http://www.floridatoday.com/story/te...-sls/98323676/

    "NASA needs a “compelling” reason for risking astronauts’ lives on the first launch of a new exploration rocket from Kennedy Space Center, if a study determines such a mission is feasible, a panel of independent safety advisers said Thursday at KSC.

    “We strongly advise that NASA carefully and cautiously weigh the value proposition for flying crew on EM-1,” said Patricia Sanders, chair of NASA’s Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel, referring to the test flight called Exploration Mission-1."

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  4. #34
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    They should squeeze in some extra couches and make the crew wear plain clothes to help make room.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Glom View Post
    They should squeeze in some extra couches and make the crew wear plain clothes to help make room.
    If they're going to squeeze in anything, it should be some MOOSE-style re-entry packs in case the capsule falls apart.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    If they're going to squeeze in anything, it should be some MOOSE-style re-entry packs in case the capsule falls apart.
    I was making a Voskhod 1 reference.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Glom View Post
    I was making a Voskhod 1 reference.
    Yeah, what could possibly go wrong?
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glom View Post
    I was making a Voskhod 1 reference.
    Yeah, how'd that work out?
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  9. #39
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    With SpaceX and Boeing coming out with their new commercial space capsules that can take more then 3 astronauts on a single flight, NASA is planning to increase the number of astronauts living in the ISS.

    https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2017...ncrease-early/

    "But with the new generation of US commercial crew vehicles, which can accommodate four astronauts, it will finally become possible to increase the station’s crew size to its originally conceived number of seven, including four USOS crewmembers."

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  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    NASA needs to provide a backup plan, if the commercial crew programme is delayed further, by the 13th of March this year.
    They have by buying some extra Soyuz seats form Boeing

    http://www.spacepolicyonline.com/new...ts-from-boeing

    NASA has purchased two seats with an option for three more on Russian Soyuz spacecraft through Boeing to transport astronauts to and from the International Space Station (ISS). One seat each in 2017 and 2018 will allow a fourth U.S.-sponsored astronaut to fly to the ISS while Russia reduces its own crew complement. The three options are for 2019 in case the new U.S. commercial crew systems, one of which is being built by Boeing, are not ready by then. The options must be exercised by the fall of this year.

    Boeing gained the ability to make seats on Soyuz available to NASA as part of an agreement with the Russian company Energia to settle outstanding financial issues related to the Sea Launch program. Sea Launch was a U.S. (Boeing)-Russian (Energia)-Ukrainian (Yuzhonye) -Norwegian (Kvaerner) company that launched rockets from a converted mobile oil platform at sea. The platform was based in Long Beach, CA and towed to a location close to the equator to launch satellites in geostationary orbit (which is located above the equator). Boeing was the major shareholder initially, but launch failures led to the company declaring bankruptcy in 2009 and Russia's Energia took majority ownership in 2010. Sea Launch utilized Ukraine's Zenit booster and the disrupted Russian-Ukrainian relationship following Russia's annexation of Crimea in 2014 added to the company's woes. A Russian venture, S7 Group, is buying Sea Launch, but Boeing and Energia needed to reach a financial settlement first. Energia builds the Soyuz spacecraft and the five seats were made available to Boeing as part of the settlement.

  11. #41
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    I do not have a subscription to the Wall Street Journal. It has information on problems with shielding with the latest USA human space capsules.

    Have others more information on it?

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/nasas-l...ted-1495827859

    "NASA’s next-generation manned spacecraft, initially envisioned to be roughly 10 times safer than the retired space shuttle fleet, will fall significantly short of that goal, according to industry and former agency officials."

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  12. #42
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    I'm not sure I'd be happy with a 1 in 500 catastrophic loss of crew failure either for a spacecraft intended for the next several decades of service.

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    Some good news for Boeing and SpaceX on their human space capsule development.

    https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2017...gress-flights/

    "As the mid-way point of 2017 arrives, both of NASA’s Commercial Crew Program service providers are making significant progress toward the first uncrewed test flights of their Dragon and Starliner capsules. At their second quarter 2017 meeting, the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel noted this progress while also discussing outstanding concerns regarding the program and vehicles as well as the positive steps being taken to address these matters."

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  14. #44
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    SpaceX delays the 1st flight its commercial crew test flights by four months.

    http://spacenews.com/spacex-delays-c...-half-of-2018/

    SpaceX has delayed its two commercial crew test flights by four months, according to a new NASA schedule released Jan. 11, raising questions about whether it or Boeing will be able to send astronauts to the International Space Station by the end of the year as previously planned.

    The updated schedule, which NASA said represents “the most recent publicly releasable dates” for the two companies, lists an uncrewed test flight of SpaceX’s Crew Dragon spacecraft in August 2018, followed by a crewed test flight in December. The previous schedule released by NASA, in October 2017, stated those flights would take place in April and August 2018, respectively.

    SpaceX spokesperson Eva Behrend, in a statement to SpaceNews, did not discuss the reasons for the delay. “SpaceX continues to target 2018 for the first demonstration missions with and without crew under NASA’s Commercial Crew Program,” she said.

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    Dream Chaser by Sierra Nevada Corporations is another space capsule being developed by an American commercial company to carry crew and cargo. It just completed another NASA milestone.

  16. #46
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    SpaceX might face more obstacles before they can launch humans to space.

    http://spacenews.com/safety-panel-ra...crew-missions/

    An independent safety panel recommended NASA not certify SpaceX’s commercial crew system until the agency better understands the behavior of pressure vessels linked to a Falcon 9 failure in 2016.

    That recommendation was one of the stronger items in the annual report of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) released by NASA Jan. 11, which found that NASA was generally managing risk well on its various programs.

    The report devoted a section to the composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) used to store helium in the second stage propellant tanks of the Falcon 9. The investigation into the September 2016 pad explosion that destroyed a Falcon 9 while being prepared for a static-fire test concluded that liquid oxygen in the tank got trapped between the COPV overwrap and liner and then ignited through friction or other mechanisms.

    SpaceX has since changed its loading processes to avoid exposing the COPVs to similar conditions, but also agreed with NASA to redesign the COPV to reduce the risk for crewed launches. NASA has since started a “rigorous test program” to understand how the redesigned COPV behaves when exposed to liquid oxygen, the report stated.

  17. #47
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    The Planetary Society carries an article on "NASA's latest commercial crew delay".

    http://www.planetary.org/blogs/jason...rew-delay.html

    There's an old Calvin and Hobbes comic strip in which Calvin wanders off missing at the zoo, and his Dad, searching for him, says "being a parent is wanting to hug and strangle your kid at the same time." I'm not sure why that strip stayed stuck in my brain all these years, but I can definitely sympathize with the concept, as both a parent and a space fan.

    Today, NASA and its Commercial Crew partners faced the music on Capitol Hill, testifying about the latest delay for an already delayed program trying to launch astronauts from American soil for the first time since the end of the shuttle program in 2011. To recap the well-known facts: NASA can currently only access the ISS via the Russian Soyuz. The situation is politically unpalatable, expensive (NASA last paid about $82 million per Soyuz seat), and detrimental to the agency’s human research programs, because there aren’t enough astronauts aboard the station to fully utilize its potential.

    For NASA, this has always been an annoyance, and today we learned it could escalate into a full-fledged problem. NASA has only purchased Soyuz seats through Fall 2019, and both Boeing and SpaceX won't be ready to carry out their first crewed test flights until the end of this year. Both company’s vehicles must next be certified before starting regular ISS service, and though publicly that's scheduled to happen in early 2019, internal estimates show it may not occur until December 2019 for SpaceX and February 2020 for Boeing.

    Even if NASA panics and immediately buys more Soyuz seats, it takes about three years to build a Soyuz spacecraft, meaning there won’t be extra seats available anytime soon. Bill Gerstenmaier, the associate administrator for NASA's human spaceflight program, could only say NASA was "brainstorming" how to fill a potential gap in 2019.

  18. #48
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    The 2018 NASA budget is in full support of Human Spaceflight Launches.

    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/NA...nches_999.html

    NASA's Commercial Crew Program and private industry partners, Boeing and SpaceX, continue to develop the systems that will return human spaceflight to the United States. Both commercial partners are undertaking considerable amounts of testing in 2018 to prove space system designs and the ability to meet NASA's mission and safety requirement for regular crew flights to the International Space Station.

    "The work Boeing and SpaceX are doing is incredible. They are manufacturing spaceflight hardware, performing really complicated testing and proving their systems to make sure we get it right." said Kathy Lueders, program manager NASA Commercial Crew Program. "Getting it right is the most important thing."

    Both Boeing and SpaceX plan to fly test missions without crew to the space station prior to test flights with a crew onboard this year. After each company's test flights, NASA will work to certify the systems and begin post-certification crew rotation missions.

  19. #49
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    NASA is looking into the possibility of changing Boeing's commercial crew test flight into an operational flight.

    http://spacenews.com/nasa-studies-ex...o-support-iss/

    A commercial crew contract modification moves NASA one step closer to using a test flight as an operational mission to maintain a presence on the International Space Station.

    NASA announced April 5 that it had updated its Commercial Crew Transportation Capability (CCtCap) contract with Boeing to study potential changes to the second of two test flights of the company’s CST-100 Starliner vehicle, currently intended to carry two people on a short-duration mission to the station.

    Those changes, NASA said, would involve adding a third crewmember to flight and extending its mission from two weeks to as long as six months, the typical length of an astronaut’s stay on the ISS. The changes would involve training and mission support for that third crewmember and the potential to fly cargo on both that mission and an earlier uncrewed test flight.

  20. #50
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    SpaceX makes progress toward Commercial Crew debut,

    https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2018...al-crew-debut/

    In a year that should see both SpaceX and Boeing conduct the uncrewed test flights of their respective crew launch vehicles, Space Exploration Technologies, SpaceX, is making good progress toward its commercial crew goals. With specific launch target dates to be reevaluated next month at a standard quarterly review, SpaceX is currently aiming to conduct their uncrewed demo flight test of Crew Dragon followed by an in-flight abort test before the all-important crew flight test in the second half of this year.

  21. #51
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    Human operational flights from the USA only in 2020?

    https://arstechnica.com/science/2018...urther-delays/

    "A new report provides some insight into the challenges that SpaceX and Boeing are facing when it comes to flying commercial crew missions, and it also suggests both companies may be nearly two years away from reaching operational status for NASA.

    The assessment of large projects at NASA, published on Tuesday by the US Government Accountability Office, found that certification of the private spacecraft for flying astronauts to the International Space Station may be delayed to December 2019 for SpaceX and February 2020 for Boeing."

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  22. #52
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    SpaceX's Crew Dragon completes two key tests

    http://www.spaceflightinsider.com/mi...nal-readiness/

    After recently being subjected to electromagnetic interference (EMI) testing, SpaceX’s Crew Dragon inches closer to operational readiness with the completion of two key tests.

  23. #53
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    U.S. Government Accountability Office report warns of delays in US schedule to send US astronauts from the US.

    https://spacenews.com/commercial-cre...iss-gao-warns/

    Amid growing concerns about commercial crew delays, a U.S. Government Accountability Office report recommended NASA share more schedule information with Congress and develop contingency plans to maintain access to the International Space Station.

    In a July 11 report, the GAO said that Boeing and SpaceX could miss their current schedules for having their commercial crew vehicles certified by NASA by a year or more, creating a gap in access to the station when the agency’s use of Soyuz seats ends late next year.

    “Boeing and SpaceX continue to make progress developing a capability to fly to the ISS, but both have continued to experience delays,” the GAO concluded in its report. “Additional delays could also disrupt U.S. access to the ISS.”

  24. #54
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    Boeing's plan to send astronauts to the ISS has hit a problem which will likely delay the project.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/techn...=.c5040c864c2d

    The spacecraft Boeing plans to use to fly NASA astronauts to the International Space Station suffered a significant setback when, during a test of its emergency abort system in June, officials discovered a propellant leak, the company confirmed.

    In a statement to The Washington Post, Boeing said it has “been conducting a thorough investigation with assistance from our NASA and industry partners. We are confident we found the cause and are moving forward with corrective action.”

    The leak is likely to delay its launch schedule and is another setback for a program that has faced a number of problems. The trouble also comes as Vice President Pence is expected to announce the crews for the first missions during a ceremony in early August at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

  25. #55
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    Status update on SpaceX and Boeing's effort to send astronauts to space.

    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/NA...retch_999.html

    NASA and commercial industry partners Boeing and SpaceX are making significant advances in preparing to launch astronauts from U.S. soil for the first time since the space shuttle's retirement in 2011. As part of the Commercial Crew Program's public-private partnership, both companies are fine-tuning their designs, integrating hardware, and testing their crew spacecraft and rockets to prepare for test flights

    Here's a look at the milestones so far in 2018:

  26. #56
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    "Boeing delays first Starliner flight as capsule to fly NASA astronauts setback 6 months"

    https://www.cnbc.com/2018/08/01/boei...-6-months.html

    Boeing pushed back the flight schedule of its Starliner capsule by several months, the company said on a conference call with reporters Wednesday. The capsule, being built to fly U.S. astronauts to the International Space Station, suffered a failure during a test in June.

    "The resulting schedule that we have will support an uncrewed flight test in late 2018 or early 2019," Boeing vice president John Mulholland said.

  27. #57
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    "NASA confirms delays in Boeing and SpaceX commercial crew flights"

    https://spacenews.com/nasa-confirms-...-crew-flights/

    NASA released an updated schedule of commercial crew test flights Aug. 2 that confirms Boeing’s revised plans as well as delays for SpaceX’s two demonstration missions.

    The agency released the revised schedule with little fanfare ahead of a planned Aug. 3 announcement at the Johnson Space Center of the astronauts that will fly the two companies’ crewed demonstration missions, as well as on the first post-certification, or operational, missions by each company.

    Under the new schedule, SpaceX will fly an uncrewed demonstration mission in November 2018, three months later than the previous schedule released by NASA early this year. The crewed demonstration flight, with two astronauts on board, will follow in April 2019, four months later than previously announced.

    The revised schedule also confirmed dates provided by Boeing in a call with selected media Aug. 1. That schedule calls for an uncrewed test flight in late 2018 or early 2019, followed by a crewed test flight in mid-2019.

  28. #58
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    The NASA astronauts, that will fly from American soil for the first time in a very long time, have been announced.

    https://arstechnica.com/science/2018...n-spaceflight/

    For the first time since September 2010, NASA has named a new, All-American crew that will launch into space from the United States. In fact, the organization announced four of them on Friday, selecting the first two crews that will fly aboard SpaceX’s Dragon and Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft on their test and operational flights.

    NASA celebrated the announcement with all the pomp and circumstance one would expect from an agency that has chafed under a spaceflight gap during which America has relied on Russia for human access to space. As they were announced Friday, each of the nine crew members exulted as he or she walked across the stage. Some raised their arms in triumph. Others pumped their fists. It was a cathartic day in Houston, Texas as a crowd of onlookers in a large auditorium cheered.

  29. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    "NASA confirms delays in Boeing and SpaceX commercial crew flights"

    https://spacenews.com/nasa-confirms-...-crew-flights/
    SpaceX has said they are on schedule to launch astronauts to space next year from American soil.

    https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news...track-10615090

    Tech magnate Elon Musk's SpaceX vowed Monday (Aug 13) to send its first astronauts into orbit on schedule next year - part of a drive to restore America's dominance of the space race.

    Gwynne Shotwell, the aerospace manufacturer's president, told journalists in Los Angeles an unmanned flight to the International Space Station in November would pave the way for a manned mission in April 2019.

    "Predicting launch dates could make a liar out of the best of us. I hope I am not proven to be a liar on this one," she said.

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