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Thread: Moon Rocks - List of Investigators, July 1969

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    Moon Rocks - List of Investigators, July 1969

    The next time someone tells us that the moon rocks were faked and the scientists who investigated them were hoodwinked by Nasa, perhaps he/she could be referred to the following list of well over 100 investigators and asked to tell us exactly which of them were incompetent.

    The hoax-believer could get a copy of the December 1969 National Geographic and read a preliminary article about the Apollo 11 rocks on pages 788-791. Worthy of note there is a comment from Dr S. Ross Taylor of the Australian National University (who is unlikely to be a Nasa conspirator): "The moon rocks are different enough from earth rocks to keep us busy for years."

    The September 1973 National Geographic issue has, on page 322, a photograph of one of the investigators listed below, Dr David S. McKay, his assistant Dr Uel S. Clanton, and electron microscope photos taken by them.

    The list is from the Apollo 11 Press Kit, pages 220-241, and only includes those investigators who had put their names forward as at July 1969. There were more.

    PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATORS AND INVESTIGATIONS OF LUNAR SURFACE SAMPLES

    Adams, J. B. -- Co-Investigator: Jones, R. L
    Caribbean Research Inst., St. Thomas, V. I.; NASA Manned Spacecraft Center Houston, Texas
    Investigation: Visible and Near-Infrared Reflection Spectroscopy of Returned Lunar Sample at CRI & Lunar Receiving Lab. (LRL)

    Adler, I. -- Co-Investigators: Walter, L. S., Goldstein, J. I., Philpotts, J. A., Lowman, P. D., French, B. M.
    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
    Investigation: Elemental Analysis by Electron Microprobe

    Agrell, S.O. -- Co-Investigator: Muir, I. O.
    University Cambridge, England
    Investigation: Broad Mineralogic Studies

    Alvarez, L. W. -- Co-Investigator: Watt, R. D.
    University of California, Berkeley, California
    Investigation: Search for Magnetic Monopoles at LRL

    Anders, E. -- Co-Investigators: Keays, R. R., Ganapathy, R., Jeffery, P. M.
    University of Chicago, Chicago
    Investigation: (a) Determine 14 Elements By Neutron Activation Analysis (b) Measure Cosmic Ray Induced Al26 Content

    Anderson, O. -- Co-Investigators: Soga, N., Kumazawa, M.
    Lamont Geol. Obs., Columbia Univ., Palisades, N.Y.
    Investigation: Measure Sonic Velocity, Thermal Expansivity, Specific Heat, Dielectric Constant, and Index of Refraction

    Arnold, J. R. -- Co-Investigators: Suess, H. E., Bhandari, N., Shedlovsky, J., Honda. M., Lal, D.
    Univ. Calif., San Diego, La Jolla, Calif.
    Investigation: Determine Cosmic Ray and Solar Particle Activation Effects

    Arrhenius. G. O. -- Co-Investigators: Reid, A., Fitzgerald, R.
    Univ. Calif., San Diego, La Jolla, Calif.
    Investigation: Determine Microstructure Characteristics and Composition

    Barghoorn, E. -- Co-Investigator: Philpott, D.
    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, Mass.; NASA Ames Res. Center, Moffett Field, Calif.
    Investigation: Electron Microscopy of Returned Lunar Organic Samples

    Bastin, J. -- Co-Investigator: Clegg, P. E.
    Queen Mary College, London, England
    Investigation: Measure Electric Properties and Thermal Conductivity

    Bell, P. M. -- Co-Investigator: Finger, L.
    Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington D. C.
    Investigation: Determine Crystal Structure of Separated Mineral Phases

    Biemann, K.
    Mass. Inst. Tech., Cambridge, Mass.
    Investigation: Mass Spectrometric Analyses for Organic Matter in Lunar Crust

    Birkebak, R. C. -- Co-Investigators: Cremers, C. J., Dawson, J. P.
    Univ. Kentucky, Lexington, Ky.
    Investigation: Measure Thermal Radiative Features and Thermal Conductivity

    Bowie, S. H. U. -- Co-Investigators: Horne, J. E. T., Snelling, N. J.
    Inst. of Geol. Sciences, London England
    Investigation: Determinative Mineralogy for Opaque Materials by Electron Microprobe, Distribution of Radioactive Material by Auto-Radiograph, Analysis for Pb, U and Th Isotopes by Mass Spectrometry

    Brown, G. M. -- Co-Investigators: Emeleus, C. H., Holland, J. G., Phillips, R.
    Univ. Durham, Durham, England
    Investigation: Petrologic Analysis by Standard Methods; Electron Probe Analysis Reflected Light Microscopy

    Burlingame, A. L. -- Co-Investigator: Biemann, K.
    Univ. of Calif., Berkeley, Calif.; Mass. Inst. Tech., Cambridge, Mass.
    Investigation: Organic Mass Spectrometer Development for LRL

    Calvin, M. -- Co-Investigator: Burlingame, A. L.
    Univ. of Calif., Berkeley, Calif.
    Investigation: Study of Lunar Samples by Mass Spectrometry (Computerized) and Other Analytical Instrumentation

    Cameron, E. N.
    Univ. Wisconsin, Madison, Wis.
    Investigation: Determine Structure, Composition Texture, and Phases of Opaque Material by Many Methods

    Carter, N. L.
    Yale Univ., New Haven, Conn.
    Investigation: Determine Effects of Shock on Lunar Materials Using Optical X-Ray, and Electron Microscopic Methods

    Chao, E. C. T. -- Co-Investigators: James, O. B., Wilcox, R. E., Minkin, J. A.
    U.S. Geol. Survey, Washington, D. C.
    Investigation: Shocked Mineral Studies by Optical, X-Ray and Microprobe Techniques

    Clayton, R. N.
    Univ. Chicago
    Investigation: Determine Stable Isotope of Oxygen

    Cloud, P. -- Co-Investigator: Philpott, D.
    Univ. Calif., Los Angeles; NASA Ames Res. Ctr.
    Investigation: Electron Microscopy of Returned Lunar Organic Samples

    Collett, L. S. -- Co-Investigator: Becker, A.
    Geol. Survey, Canada
    Investigation: Determine Electrical Conductivity

    Compston, W. C. -- Co-Investigators: Arriens, P. A., Chappell, B. W., Vernon, M. J.
    Australian Nat'l University, Canberra
    Investigation: Sr and Sr Isotopes By X-Ray Fluorescence and Mass Spectrometry

    Dalrymple, G. B. -- Co-Investigator: Doell, R. R
    U.S. Geol. Survey, Menlo Park, Calif.
    Investigation: Measure Natural & Induced Thermoluminescence to determine History and Environmental Features of Lunar Materials

    Davis, R. -- Co-Investigator: Stoenner, R. W.
    Brookhaven Nat. Lab., L.I., New York
    Investigation: Determine Ar37, Ar39 Content

    Doell, R. R. -- Co-Investigators: Gromme, C. S., Senftle, F.
    U.S. Geol. Survey, Menlo Park, Calif.
    Investigation: Measurement of Magnetic Properties at LRL and USGS Laboratories, Survey of Remnant Magnetism of Lunar Samples in Vacuum in the LRL

    Douglas, J. A. V. -- Co-Investigators: Currie, K. L., Dence, M. R., Traill, R. J.
    Geol. Survey of Canada, Ottawa, Canada
    Investigation: Petrologic, Mineralogic and Textural Studies

    Duke, M. B. -- Co-Investigator: Smith, R. L.
    U.S. Geol. Survey, Washington, D. C.
    Investigation: Determine Size Frequency Distribution, Physical Properties and Composition of Lunar Materials of Sub-100 Micron Grain Size

    Edgington, J. A. -- Co-Investigator: Blair, I. M.
    Queen Mary College, Univ. London; Atomic Energy Res. Establishment
    Investigation: Measure Luminescent and Thermoluminescent Properties Under Proton (147 MEV) Bombardment

    Eglinton, G. -- Co-Investigator: Lovelock, J. E.
    Univ. Bristol, Bristol, England
    Investigation: To Establish the Precise Nature of Organic Compounds in Lunar Material

    Ehmann, W. D. -- Co-Investigator: Morgan, J. W.
    Univ. Kentucky, Lexington, Ky.
    Investigation: Analysis for Major Rock Forming Elements using 14 MEV Neutron Activation

    Engel, A. E. -- Co-Investigator: Engel, A. C. J.
    Univ. Calif., San Diego, La Jolla, Calif.
    Investigation: Wet Chemical Analysis for Major Elements

    Epstein, S. -- Co-Investigator: Taylor, H. P.
    Cal. Inst. Tech., Pasadena, Calif.
    Investigation: Determine Content of Stable Isotopes of O, C, H, and Si by Mass Spectrometry

    Evans, H. T. -- Co-Investigators: Barton, P. B. Jr., Roseboom, E. H.
    U.S. Geol. Survey, Washington, D. C.
    Investigation: Crystal Structures of Sulfides and Related Minerals

    Fields, P. R. -- Co-Investigators: Hess. D. C., Stevens, C.
    Argonne Nat. Lab., Argonne, Ill.
    Investigation: Measure by Mass Spectrometry the Isotopic Abundances of Heavy Elements

    Fireman, E. L.
    Smithsonian Inst., Astrophysical Obs., Cambridge, Mass.
    (a) Measure the Ar37 and Ar39 Content by Mass Spectrometry (b) Determine Tritium Content by Low Level Counting Techniques

    Fleischer, R. L. -- Co-Investigators: Hanneman, R. E., Kasper, J. S., Price, P. B., Walker, R. M.
    General Electric, Schnectady, N. Y.; Washington Univ., St. Louis, Mo.
    Investigation: (a) Measure Structural Defects in Lunar Materials Through Study of Optical, Electrical and Mechanical Properties (b) Determine the Effect of Cosmic Radiation on Lunar Samples by Study of Fossil Tracks Resulting from Charged Particles

    Fox, S. -- Co-Investigators: Harada, K., Mueller, G.
    Univ. Miami, Coral Gables, Fla
    Investigation: Analysis of Organic Lunar Samples for ALPHA Amino Acids and Polymers Thereof

    Fredriksson, K. -- Co-Investigator: Nelen, J.
    Smithsonian Inst. Nat. Museum, Washington, D. C.
    Investigation: Elemental Analysis by Electron Microprobe

    Friedman, I. -- Co-Investigator: O'Neil, J. R.
    U.S. Geol. Survey, Denver, Colo.
    Investigation: Isotopic Composition of H, D, and Oxygen

    Frondel, C. -- Co-Investigators: Klein, C., Ito, J.
    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, Mass.
    Investigation: Broad Studies of the Texture, composition, and Relationship of Minerals

    Gast, P. W.
    Lamont Geol. Obs., Columbia Univ., Palisades, N. Y.
    Investigation: Determine Concentration of the Alkali, Alkaline Earth and Lanthanide Elements by Mass Spectrometry

    Gay, P. -- Co-Investigators: Brown, M. G., McKie, D.
    Univ. Cambridge, Cambridge, England
    Investigation: X-Ray Crystallographic Studies

    Geake, J. E. -- Co-Investigator: Garlick, G. F. J.
    Univ. Manchester, Manchester, England
    Investigation: Measure Fluorescence Emission and Other Excitation Spectra; Optical Polarization; X-Ray Fluorescence; Electron Spin Resonance; Neutron Activation Analysis

    Geiss, J. -- Co-Investigators: Eberhardt, P., Grogler, N., Oeschger, H.
    Univ. Berne, Berne, Switzerland
    Investigation: Measure Rare Gas Content and Cosmic Ray Produced Tritium by Mass Spectrometry

    Gold, T.
    Cornell Univ., Ithaca, N. Y.
    Investigation: Particle size Analysis, Photometric Studies of Radiation Effects from Several Types of Rays; Direct Measure of Radiative Properties; Dielectric Constant and Loss Tangent

    Goles, G. G.
    Univ. Oregon, Eugene, Ore.
    Investigation: Elemental Abundances by Neutron Activation Analysis

    Greenman, N. N. -- Co-Investigator: Cross, H. G.
    McDonnell-Douglas Corp. Santa Monica, Calif.
    Investigation: Determine the Luminescence Spectra and Efficiencies of Lunar Material and Compare with Mineral Composition

    Grossman, J. J. -- Co-Investigators: Ryan, J. A., Mukherjee, N. R.
    McDonnell-Douglas Corp., Santa Monica, Calif.
    Investigation: Microphysical, Microchemical and Adhesive Characteristics of the Lunar Materials

    Hafner, S. -- Co-Investigator: Virgo, D.
    Univ. Chicago, Chicago, Ill.
    Investigation: Using Mossbauer and NMR Techniques Measure the Oxidation State of Iron, Radiation Damage and Al, Na, Fe Energy State in Crystals

    Halpern, B. -- Co-Investigator: Hodgson, G. W.
    Stanford Univ., Palo Alto, Calif.
    Investigation: Determine Terrestrial & Extra-terrestrial Porphyrins in Association with Amino Acid Compounds

    Hapke, B. W. -- Co-Investigators: Cohen, A. J., Cassidy, W.
    Univ. Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pa.
    Investigation: Determine Effects of Solar Wind on Lunar Material

    Haskin, L. A.
    Univ. Wisconsin, Madison, Wis.
    Investigation: Determine Rare Earth Element Content by Neutron Activation Analysis

    Helsley, C. E. -- Co-Investigators: Burek, P. J., Oetking, P.
    Grad. Res. Center of the Southwest, Dallas, Texas
    Investigation: Remanent Magnetism Studies

    Helz, A. W. -- Co-Investigator: Annell, C. S.
    U.S. Geol. Survey, Washington, D. C.
    Investigation: Special Trace Elements by Emission Spectroscopy

    Herr, W. -- Co-Investigators: Kaufhold. J., Skerra, B., Herpers, U.
    Univ. Cologne, Cologne, Germany
    Investigation: (a) Determine Mn53 Content by High Flux Neutron Bombardment (b) Determine Age of Lunar Materials Using Fission Track Method (c) Measure Thermoluminescence to Determine Effect of intrinsic Radioactive and Cosmic Ray Particles and Thermal History

    Herzenberg, C. L.
    Ill. Inst. Of Tech., Chicago
    Investigation: Measure the Energy States of the Iron Bearing Minerals and Possible Effects of Cosmic Radiation

    Hess, H. H. -- Co-Investigator: Otolara, G.
    Princeton Univ., Princeton, N. J.
    Investigation: Determine Pyroxene Content by X-Ray and Optical Methods

    Heymann, D. -- Co-Investigators: Adam, J. A. A., Fryer, G. E.
    Rice Univ., Houston, Texas
    Investigation: Determine Rare Gases and Radioactive Isotopes by Mass Spectrometry

    Hintenberger. H. -- Co-Investigators: Begemann, R., Schultz, L., Vilcsek, E., Voshage, H., Wanke, H., Wlotzka, A.
    Max Planke Inst., Fur Chemie, Mainz, Germany
    Investigation: (a) Abundance and isotopic Composition of Hydrogen (b) Measure Concentration and Isotopic Composition of Rare Gases (c) Isotopic Composition of Nitrogen

    Hoering, T. -- Co-Investigator: Kaplan, I. R.
    Carnegie Inst., D. C.; Univ. Calif., L. A.
    Investigation: Analytical Lunar Sample Analyses for C13/C12 and D/H of Organic Matter

    Hurley, P. M. -- Co-Investigator: Pinson, W. H., Jr.
    Mass. Inst. Tech., Cambridge, Mass.
    Investigation: Analyze for Rb, Sr, and their Isotopes

    Jedwab, J.
    Univ. Libre De Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium
    Investigation: Determine the Morphological, Optical and Petrographic Properties of Magnetite and its Chemical Composition by Electron Microprobe

    Johnson, R. D.
    NASA Ames Research Ctr.
    Investigation: Analysis of Lunar Sample for Organic Carbon Behind the Barrier System of the LRL

    Kaplan, I. R. -- Co-Investigators: Berger, R., Schopf, J. W.
    Univ. Calif., Los Angeles, Calif.
    Investigation: Ratios of Carbon Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Sulphur Isotope Ratios by Mass Spectrometry

    Kanamori, H. -- Co-Investigators: Mizutani, H., Takeuchi, H.
    Univ. Tokyo, Japan
    Investigation: Determine Elastic Constants by Shear/Compressions/Wave Velocity

    Keil, K. -- Co-Investigators: Bunch, T. E., Prinz, M., Snetsinger, K. G.
    Univ. New Mexico, Albuquerque, N. M.
    Investigation: Elemental Analysis and Mineral Phase Studies by Electron Microprobe

    King, E. A. -- Co-Investigators: Morrison, D. A., Greenwood, W. R.
    NASA Manned Spacecraft Center
    Investigation: Non-Destructive Mineralogy & Petrology; Analysis of the Fine Size Fraction of Lunar Materials Including Vitreous Phases

    Kohman, T. P. -- Co-Investigator: Tanner, J. T.
    Carnegie Inst. of Tech., Pittsburgh, Pa.
    Investigation: Determine isotopic Abundance of Pb, Sr, OS, T1, Nd, and Ag by Mass Spectrometry

    Kuno, H. -- Co-Investigator: Kushiro, I.
    Univ. Tokyo, Japan
    Investigation: Petrographic Analysis for Mineral Identification and Chemical Composition

    Larochelle, A. -- Co-Investigator: Schwarz, E. J.
    Geol. Survey, Ottawa, Canada
    Investigation: Thermomagnetic, Magnetic Susceptibility and Remanent Magnetism Studies

    Lipsky, S. R. -- Co-Investigators: Horvath, C. G., McMurray, W. J.
    Yale Univ., New Haven, Conn.
    Investigation: Identification of Organic Compounds in Lunar Material by Means of Gas Chromatography -- Mass Spectrometry, NMR, High Speed Liquid Chromatography, and Variations on these techniques

    Lovering J. F. -- Co-Investigators: Butterfield. D. (a), Kleeman, J. D. (b), Veizer, J. (b), Ware, N. G. (c)
    Australian Nat'l Uni., Canberra, Australia
    Investigation: (a) Neutron Activation for U, Th, K (b) Fission Track Analysis for U (c) Electron Microprobe Analysis for Elemental Composition

    MacGregor, I. D. -- Co-Investigator: Carter, J. L.
    Grad. Research Ctr., S.W. Dallas, Texas
    Investigation: Petrographic Analysis by X-Ray Diffraction and Optical Methods

    Manatt, S. L. -- Co-Investigators: Elleman, D. D., Vaughan, R. W., Chan, S. I.
    NASA Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, Calif.; Cal. Inst. Tech.
    Investigation: Nuclear Radio Frequency Analysis Including NMR & ESR Analysis for Oxygen, Hydrogen, Water Content and other elements and their Chemical State

    Mason, B. -- Co-Investigators: Jarosewich, B., Fredriksson, K., White, J. S.
    Smithsonian Inst., Nat. Museum, Washington, D. C.
    Investigation: Mineralogic investigations

    Maxwell, J. A. -- Co-Investigators: Abbey, S., Champ, W. H.
    Geol. Survey, Canada, Ottawa, Canada
    Investigation: Wet Chemical, X-Ray Fluorescence and Emission Spectroscopy; Flame Photometry for Major/Minor Elements; Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    McKay, D. S. -- Co-Investigators: Anderson. D. H., Greenwood, W. R., Morrison, D. A.
    Manned Spacecraft Center
    Investigation: Determine Morphology and Composition of Fine Particles Using Electron Microprobe and Scanning Electron Microscope. Analysis to be Undertaken After Quarantine and not within the LRL

    Meinschein, W. G.
    Indiana Univ., Bloomington, Ind.
    Investigation: Determine the Alkane C15 To C30 Content By Gas Chromatographic and Mass Spectrometric Techniques

    Moore, C.
    Arizona State Univ., Temple, Ariz.
    Investigation: Determine Total Concentration of Carbon and Nitrogen

    Morrison, G. H.
    Cornell Univ.
    Investigation: Elemental Analysis Using Spark Source Mass Spectrometry

    Muir, A. H., Jr.
    North American Rockwell Corp., Science Center, Thousand Oaks, Calif.
    Investigation: Conduct Mossbauer Effect and Spectroscopic Study of Iron-Bearing Mineral Separates

    Murthy, V. R.
    Univ. Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn.
    Investigation: Determine Rare-Earth Elemental and Low Abundance Isotopes of K, Ca, V and Cr Content by Neutron Activation

    Nagata. T. -- Co-Investigators: Ozima. M., Ishikiwa, Y.
    Univ. Tokyo, Japan
    Investigation: Remanent Magnetism Studies

    Nagy, B. -- Co-Investigator: Urey, H.
    Univ. Calif., San Diego, La Jolla, Calif.
    Investigation: The Presence or Absence of Lipids, Amino Acids, and "Polymer-Type" Organic Matter

    Nash, D. B.
    NASA Jet Propulsion Lab.
    Investigation: Measure Luminescence, and Physical/Chemical Reaction of Lunar Material to Bombardment by 0.5 to 10 KeV Protons

    O'Hara, M. J. -- Co-Investigator: Biggar, G. M.
    Univ. Edinburgh, Scotland
    Investigation: Hi-Pressure/Temperature Phase Studies, Determine Temperature of Crystallization of Minerals; Petrologic Studies

    O'Kelley, G. D. -- Co-Investigators: Bell, P. R., Eldridge, J. S., Schonfeld, E., Richardson, K. A.
    Oak Ridge Nat. Lab., Tennessee; MSC
    Investigation: Develop the Equipment/Methods for LRL; Measure the K40, U, Th, and Cosmic Ray Induced Radionuclide Content

    Oro, J. -- Co-Investigators: Zlatkis, A., Lovelock, J. E., Becker, R. S., Updegrove, W. S., Flory, D. A.
    Univ. Houston, Houston, Texas; Manned Spacecraft Ctr.
    A Comprehensive Study of the Carbonaceous and Organogenic Matter Present in Returned Lunar Samples with Combination of Gas Chromatographic and Mass Spectrometric Techniques

    Oyama, V. I. -- Co-Investigators: Merek, E., Silverman, M. P.
    NASA Ames Res. Ctr., Moffett Field, Calif.
    Investigation: Isolation and Culture of Viable Organisms

    Peck, L. C.
    U.S. Geol. Survey, Denver, Colo.
    Investigation: Standard Wet Chemical Analytical Techniques for Major Elements

    Pepin, R. O. -- Co-Investigator: Nier, A. O. C.
    Univ. Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn.
    Investigation: Measure the Elemental and Isotopic Abundances of He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe by Mass Spectrometry

    Perkins, R. W. -- Co-Investigators: Wogman. N. A., Kaye, J. H., Cooper, J. A., Rancitelli, L. A.
    Battelle Mem. Inst., Richland, Wash.
    Investigation: Non-Destructive Gamma-Ray Spectrometry for Cosmic Ray Induced and Natural Radio-Nuclides

    Philpotts, J. A. -- Co-Investigators: Schnetzler, C., Masuda, A., Thomas, H. H.
    NASA Goddard Space Flight, Center, Greenbelt, Md.
    Investigation: Determine the Rare Earth Element Content Using Dilution Technique and Mass Spectrometry

    Ponnamperuma, C. A. -- Co-Investigators: Oyama, V. I., Pollack, G., Gehrke, C. W., Zill, L. P.
    NASA Ames Res. Center, Moffett Field, Calif.; Univ. Missouri
    Investigation: Analytical Lunar Sample Analyses for Amino Acids, Nucleic Acids, Sugars, Fatty Acids, Hydrocarbons, Porphyrins and Their Components

    Quaide, W. L. -- Co-Investigators: Wrigley, R. C. (a), Debs, R. J. (a), Bunch, T. E. (b)
    Ames Res. Center
    Investigation: (a) By Non-Destructive Gamma-Ray Spectrometry Determine the Al26, Na22, and Mn54 Content (b) Microscopic, X-Ray Diffraction Analysis to Determine the Effects of Shock on Minerals and Rocks

    Ramdohr. P. -- Co-Investigator: ElGoresy, A.
    Max Planck Institut, Heidelberg, Germany
    Investigation: Identification of Opaque Minerals, Phases and Composition by X-Ray, Microprobe, and Microscopic Analysis

    Reed, G. W. -- Co-Investigators: Huizenga, J., Jovanovic, S., Fuchs, L.
    Argonne Nat. Lab., Argonne, Ill.
    Investigation: Concentration, Isotopic Composition and Distribution of Trace Elements by Neutron Activation Analysis

    Reynolds, J. H. -- Co-Investigators: Rowe, M. W., Hohenberg, C. M.
    Univ. Calif., Berkeley
    Investigation: (a) Rare Gas Content by Mass Spectrometry (b) Mass Spectrometry to Identify Cosmic Ray Produced Nuclides (c) Mass Spectrometry to Determine Rare Gas, K and U Content; Identify Cosmic Ray Produced Nuclides

    Rho, J. H. -- Co-Investigators: Bauman, A. J., Bonner, J. F.
    NASA Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, California; Cal. Inst. Tech.
    Investigation: Determine Metallic and Non-Metallic Porphyrin Content by Fluorescence Spectrophotometry

    Richardson, K. A. -- Co-Investigators: McKay, D. S., Foss, T. H.
    NASA Manned Spacecraft Center, Houston, Texas
    Investigation: By Autoradiography and Alpha Particle Spectroscopy Identify Alpha Emitting Nuclides

    Ringwood, A. E. -- Co-Investigator: Green, D. H.
    Australian Nat'l Univ., Canberra
    Investigation: Petrographic Analysis by Study of Thin and Polished Sections

    Robie, R. A.
    U.S. Geol. Survey, D. C.
    Investigation: Calorimetry (Thermal Properties)

    Roedder, E.
    U.S. Geol. Survey, D. C.
    Investigation: Determine the Nature and Composition of Fluid inclusions, if Present, in Lunar Material

    Rose, H. W., Jr. -- Co-Investigators: Cuttitta, F., Dwornik, E. J
    U.S. Geol. Survey, Washington, D. C.
    Investigation: X-Ray Fluorescence Methods for Elemental Analysis

    Ross, M. -- Co-Investigators: Warner, J., Papike, J. J., Clark, J. R.
    U.S. Geol. Survey, Washington, D. C.; NASA MSC; USGS, D. C.
    Investigation: Determine the Crystallographic Parameters and Composition of Pyroxenes, Micas, Amphiboles, and Host Silicate Minerals by X-Ray Diffraction and Electron Microprobe

    Runcorn, S. K.
    Univ. of Newcastle Upon Tyne, England
    Investigation: Magnetic Properties in Conjunction with Mineralogic Studies

    Schaeffer, O. A. -- Co-Investigators: Zahringer. J., Bogard, D.
    State Univ. of N. Y. at Stony Brook, N. Y.; Max Planck Inst. Germany; Manned Spacecraft Ctr.
    Investigation: Determine Rare Gas Content by Mass Spectrometry at LRL

    Schmitt, R. A. -- Co-Investigator: Loveland, W. D.
    Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, Ore.
    Investigation: Determine Rare-Earth and Selected Trace Elements Content by Neutron Activation Analysis. Isotopes of Sm, Eu, Gd will be Determined by Mass Spectrometry

    Schopf, W.
    Univ. of Calif., L.A., Los Angeles
    Investigation: Micropaleontological Study Using Transmission and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Sclar, C. B. -- Co-Investigator: Melton, C. W.
    Battelle Mem. Inst., Columbus, Ohio
    Investigation: Using Replication and Thin Section Electron Microscopy Determine the Damage in Minerals and Rocks Due to Shock

    Scoon, J. H.
    Univ. Cambridge, England
    Investigation: Wet Chemical Analysis for Major Elements

    Short, N. M.
    Univ. Houston, Houston, Texas
    Investigation: By Petrographic Studies Determine Effect of Shock on Rocks and Minerals and Predict Magnitude of Shock and Line of Impacting Missile

    Silver, L. T. -- Co-Investigator: Patterson, C. C.
    Calif. Inst. Tech., Pasadena, Calif.
    Investigation: Determine Lead isotopes, Concentrations of U, Th, Pb, and their occurrence in Minerals

    Simmons, G. -- Co-Investigators: Brace, W. F., Wones, D. R. (parts a & b only)
    Mass. Inst. Tech., Cambridge, Mass.
    Investigation: (a) Calculate Elastic Properties From Measurement of Compressional Shear Wave Velocities at STP (b) Measure Thermal Conductivity, Expansion and Diffusivity at STP (c) Determine Dielectric Constant, Resistivity (d) Determine Thermal Properties at STP on Samples of Core From Lunar Surface

    Sippel, R. F. -- Co-Investigator: Spencer, A. B.
    Mobil Res. and Dev. Corp., Dallas, Texas
    Investigation: Apply Luminescence Petrography to Study of Lunar Materials

    Skinner, B. J. -- Co-investigator: Winchell, H.
    Yale Univ., New Haven, Conn.
    Investigation: Examine the Returned Samples for Condensed Sublimates and if Present Determine the Mineral Phases Present and Elemental Composition

    Smales, A. A.
    Atomic Energy Research Estab., Harwell, England
    Investigation: Elemental and Isotopic Abundances by Neutron Activation Analysis and by Emission, Spark Source, and X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrography

    Smith, J. V. -- Co-Investigators: Wyllie, P. J., Elders, W. A.
    Univ. Chicago, Chicago, Ill.
    Investigation: Mineralogic-Petrographic Analysis Using Microprobe, X-Ray Diffraction and Microscopic Methods

    Stephens, D. R. -- Co-Investigator: Keeler, R. N.
    Lawrence Radiation Lab., Livermore, California
    Investigation: Physical Properties-Equation of State

    Stewart, D. B. -- Co-Investigators: Appleman, D. E., Papike, J. J., Clark, J. R., Ross, M.
    U.S. Geol. Survey. D.C.
    Investigation: Crystal Structure and Stabilities of Feldspars

    Strangway, D. W.
    Univ. Toronto, Canada
    Investigation: Determine Magnetic Properties Including Remanent, Susceptibility, Thermal, Demagnetization, Identify Magnetic Minerals

    Tatsumoto, M. -- Co-Investigator: Doe, B. R.
    U.S. Geol. Survey, Denver, Colo.
    Investigation: Pb Analysis by Mass Spectrometry; U and Th Analysis by Mass Spectrometry and Alpha Spectrometry

    Tolansky, S.
    Royal Holloway College, Univ. London, England
    Investigation: Isotopic Abundances of U and Th by Microscopic Studies of Diamonds

    Turekian, K. K.
    Yale Univ., New Haven, Conn.
    Investigation: Determine 20 Elements Having Halflives Greater Than 3 Days By Neutron Activation Analysis

    Turkevich, A. L.
    Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, Ill.
    Investigation: (a) Determine Long Lived Isotopes of K, U, and Th by Gamma Ray Spectrometry (b) Neutron Activation Analysis for U, Th, B1, Pb, Tl, and Hg.

    Turner, G.
    Univ. Sheffield
    Investigation: Determine Ar40/Ar39 for Age Dating

    Urey, H. C. -- Co-Investigator: Marti, K.
    Univ. Calif., San Diego, La Jolla, Calif.
    Investigation: Isotopic Abundances by Mass Spectroscopy

    Von Engelhardt, W. -- Co-Investigators: Stoffler, D., Muller, W., Arndt, J.
    Univ. Tubingen, Tubingen, Germany
    Investigation: Petrographic Study to Determine Shock Effects

    Walker, R. M.
    Washington Univ., St. Louis, Mo.
    Investigation: (a) Measure the Structural Damage to Crystalline Material by Several Techniques (b) Geochronological Studies by Investigation of Fission Tracks From Radioactive and Cosmic Ray Particles

    Wanke, H. -- Co-Investigators: Begemann, F., Rieder, R., Vilcsek, E., Voshage, H., Wlotzka, F.
    Max Planck Inst., Fur Chemie, Mainz Germany
    Investigation: (a) Determine K, Th, U Content (b) Measure Cosmic Ray induced Radioactive Nuclides C14 and Cl30 (c) Major Elemental Abundances by Fast Neutron Activation (d) Minor Elemental Abundances by Thermal Neutron Activation

    Wanless, R. K. -- Co-Investigators: Stevens, R. D., Loveridge, W. D.
    Geol. Survey, Ottawa, Canada
    Investigation: Determine Concentrations of Pb, U, Th, Rb, Sr, Ar, & K and the Isotopic Compositions of Pb and Sr.

    Wasserburg, G. J. -- Co-Investigator: Burnett, D. S.
    Cal. Inst. Tech.
    Investigation: Determine K, Ar, Rb, Sr and Rare Gas (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) Content by Mass Spectrometry

    Wasson. J. T. -- Co-Investigator: Baedecker, P. A.
    Univ. Calif., Los Angeles, Calif.
    Investigation: Elemental Abundances for Ga and Ge by Neutron Activation

    Weeks, R. A. -- Co-Investigator: Kolopus, J.
    Oak Ridge Nat. Lab., Oak Ridge, Tenn.
    Investigation: Determine the Valence State and Symmetry of the Crystalline Material Using Electron Spin and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Techniques and Spin Lattice Relaxation Studies

    Weill, D. F.
    Univ. Oregon, Eugene, Ore.
    Investigation: Determine Temperature of Rock Formation by Study of Plagioclase Properties

    Wetherill, G. W.
    Univ. Calif., Los Angeles, Calif.
    Investigation: Determine Isotopes of Rb, Sr, U, and Pb by Mass Spectrometry

    Wiik, H. B. -- Co-Investigator: Ojanpera, P. M.
    Geol. Survey, Helsinki, Finland
    Investigation: Wet Chemical Methods to Determine Major Elemental Abundance

    Wood, J. A. -- Co-Investigator: Marvin, U. B.
    Smithsonian Inst., Astrophysical Obs., Cambridge, Mass.
    Investigation: Mineralogic and Petrologic Studies by Optical Microscopy, X-Ray Diffraction and Electron Microprobe Measurements

    Zahringer, J. -- Co-Investigators: Kirsten, I., Lammerzahl, P.
    Max Planck Inst. Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany
    Investigation: By Microprobe Analysis and Mass Spectrometry Determine Gas Content and Solar Wind Particle Distribution

    Zussman, J.
    Univ. Manchester, Manchester, England
    Investigation: Geochemical, Mineralogic, and Petrological Studies

    Edited typo in entry:
    Turner, G., Univ. Sheffield, Investigation: Determine AR4O/Ar39 for Age Dating
    Should be Ar40
    Last edited by ToSeek; 2018-Oct-17 at 06:06 PM. Reason: Corrected spelling of "Schmitt"

  2. #2
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    Whew!!! That's a lot.

    Science had a special Moon issue, January IIRR, that probably listed 3-4 many.

  3. #3
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    Nice! That's a good reference to rebut that particularly silly claim of Rene's and Kaysing's.

    JayUtah, that might make a good page for Clavius...

  4. #4
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    Did the Russians manage a sample return mission to the moon before Apollo?

    That way the samples could have been verified by a source independant of the American government.

    I vaguely remember as a child seeing illustrations of unmanned probes sent to the moon surface, did they actually happen. :-?

  5. #5
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    The Russians had several sample return missions, but they were all after Apollo.
    Everything I need to know I learned through Googling.

  6. #6
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    I spent a long time last year, doing a typescript of the Apollo 11 Press Kit. It was worth the effort due to the original being full of such useful information. The pdf is about 9Mb and the typescript is much smaller at 404 kb in a rich text file. It has better formatting than above (subscripts etc.), and I've corrected a few obvious errors in the original.

    Anyone is welcome to a copy which I'll email if they send me a personal message with their email address.

    Does anyone know of a website that would host it so that anyone can download it? I'll check with Eric Jones to see if he'd like it for the Apollo Lunar Surface Journal.

  7. #7
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    JayUtah, that might make a good page for Clavius...

    Yep. Many conspiracists believe the Apollo samples were (and still are) kept under lock and key, never to be delivered to anyone outside the U.S. and then only to geologists and other scientists who had been specially approved by the U.S. government not to spill the beans. When it is known that as early as 1969 NASA was delivering Apollo samples to scientists all over the world, it becomes less likely that they are fakes that simply haven't been discovered yet because of who is allowed to see them.

  8. #8
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    Tolansky, S.
    Royal Holloway College, Univ. London, England
    Investigation: Isotopic Abundances of U and Th by Microscopic Studies of Diamonds
    That's my department! 8)
    (Of course I knew it before...)

    EDIT to add: I hope my boss is not reading this board... 8-[

  9. #9
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    Many conspiracists believe the Apollo samples were (and still are) kept under lock and key, never to be delivered to anyone outside the U.S. and then only to geologists and other scientists who had been specially approved by the U.S. government not to spill the beans.
    Ah yes, I remember that huge CIA/FBI/MI5 security vetting form I had to fill in before I was allowed to touch the lunar samples we had at the University of Kent last summer to show to a bunch of teenage students....

    That said, there is a lot of security involved in getting hold of those samples (they are to be kept under lock and key, rooms where they are to be displayed must be closed and guarded during the display, and we were not allowed to inform the media we had them until after the event), but that has more to do with the fact that they are priceless and irreplacable than anything else.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by JayUtah
    When it is known that as early as 1969 NASA was delivering Apollo samples to scientists all over the world, it becomes less likely that they are fakes that simply haven't been discovered yet because of who is allowed to see them.
    To a rational mind, perhaps. :roll:

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by JayUtah
    JayUtah, that might make a good page for Clavius...

    Yep. Many conspiracists believe the Apollo samples were (and still are) kept under lock and key, never to be delivered to anyone outside the U.S. and then only to geologists and other scientists who had been specially approved by the U.S. government not to spill the beans. When it is known that as early as 1969 NASA was delivering Apollo samples to scientists all over the world, it becomes less likely that they are fakes that simply haven't been discovered yet because of who is allowed to see them.
    Well if I got the list right, they went too:

    Australia
    Belgium
    Canada
    England
    Finland
    Germany
    Japan
    Scotland
    Switerland

    Not excatly just the US....

  12. #12
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    I think we've sent wheat to all of those countries too... :roll:

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    Your list is a list of the 11 countries that received rocks for scientific research.

    Below is a list of the countries that got a piece of the "Goodwill" rock. These pieces are inside a plexiglass form, and hence aren't directly accessible for research. I saw a moon rock in the NEtherlands, and IIRC that was inside a prism instead of the cylinder like the goodwill plate of Honudras shows. ANy info on that?

    Here's the "goodwill" rock samples list as presented by NASA:
    Note that the USSR is listed

    No. Country Notes
    291 China
    294 Afghanistan
    295 Argentina on display at the Galileo Galilei Planetarium (unconfirmed)
    296 Australia part of the traveling exhibit "To Mars and Beyond" at the National Museum in Canberra (it will move to Melbourne next)
    297 Austria on display in the Meteorite Hall at the Naural History Museum in Vienna
    298 Bahamas
    299 Bahrain
    300 Barbados
    301 Belgium
    302 Bolivia
    303 Brazil
    304 Canada in storage at the Museum of Nature in Aylmer, Quebec
    305 Chad
    306 Taiwan
    307 Colombia
    308 Costa Rica
    309 Dahomey
    310 Denmark
    311 Dominican Republic
    312 Ecuador
    313 Egypt
    314 Congo Republic
    315 El Salvador
    316 Finland on display at the Mineralogical Museum of the Geological Survey of Finland (GTK) in Otaniemi, Espoo
    317 Gabon
    318 W. Germany
    319 Solomon Islands
    320 Guatemala
    321 Guyana on display at the Guyana Museum (unconfirmed)
    322 Haiti
    323 Honduras purchased illegimately in Honduras for $50,000 and a truck and then smuggled into the United States in 1995; offered for sale for $5 million to undercover agents and then confiscated in 1998; returned to Honduras and now on display in Tegucigalpa at Centro Interactivo Chiminike
    324 Iceland
    325 India
    326 Indonesia
    327 Iran
    328 Ireland on display at the National History Museum in Dublin
    329 Israel
    330 Italy
    331 Ivory Coast
    332 Jamaica
    333 Japan
    334 Jordan
    335 Khmer
    336 Korea
    337 Lebanon
    338 Liberia
    339 Luxemborg
    340 Malta was reported stolen in May 2004 from the National Museum of Natural History in Mdina
    341 Mexico
    342 Netherlands
    343 New Zealand
    344 Nicaragua
    345 Niger
    346 Nigeria
    347 Norway
    348 Pakistan
    349 Panama
    350 Paraguay
    351 Peru
    352 Philippines
    353 Portugal
    354 Qatar
    355 Saudi Arabia
    356 South Africa on display at the Transvaal Museum in Pretoria
    357 Spain
    358 Swaziland
    359 Switzerland
    360 Tanzania
    361 Thailand
    362 Togo
    363 Tunisia
    364 Turkey
    365 United Kingdom
    366 Uruguay
    367 Venezuela
    368 VietNam
    369 Zambia
    370 Algeria
    371 Bhutan
    372 Botswana
    373 Bulgaria
    374 Burma
    375 Cameroon
    376 Central African
    377 Mozambique
    378 Cyprus
    379 Czechoslova
    380 Guinea Equa
    381 Ethiopia
    382 Fiji
    383 France
    384 Gambia
    385 Ghana
    386 Guinea Republic
    387 Hungary
    388 Kenya
    389 Kuwait
    390 Laos on display at the Royal Palace National Museum
    391 Lesotho
    392 Libya
    393 Malagasy
    394 Malawi
    395 Malaysia
    396 Maldives
    397 Mali
    398 Mauritania
    399 Mauritius
    400 Morocco
    401 Nepal
    402 Oman
    403 Poland
    404 Romania may have been auctioned among possessions of late dictator Ceausescu
    405 Rwanda
    406 Senegal
    407 Sierra Leone
    408 Singapore on long-term loan to the Science Centre as part of the exhibit "Planetary Landscapes"
    409 Somali
    410 Sri Lanka
    411 Sudan
    412 Trinidad Tobago
    413 USSR
    414 United Arab Emirates on display at the Al Ain Museum (unconfirmed)
    415 Upper Volta
    416 Yemen
    417 Yugoslavia
    418 Zaire
    420 Bangladesh
    421 Liechtenstein
    422 Monaco
    423 Neuru
    424 San Marino
    425 Tonga
    426 Vatican on display at St. Peter's Basilica (unconfirmed)
    427 West Samoa
    428 Chile
    429 Sweden on display at Sweden's Observatory Museum

    So all these coutries have the potential to reasearch a moon rock sample (though that was NOT the intention of those samples!)
    Last edited by ToSeek; 2018-Oct-17 at 06:00 PM.

  14. #14
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    That said, there is a lot of security involved in getting hold of those samples

    I guess this holds true for the samples that can be manipulated and not so much for the "publicity" (my term) samples. When I was in high school (oh so many years ago) My chemistry/physics teacher had obtained a plexiglass or glass plate in which were embedded several samples of lunar material. We couldn't do anything more than examine the samples under a microscope, but even that was enough to compare to similar Earth formed samples and demonstrate that the lunar samples formed in the absence of water.
    There was no guards needed and all Fr. Stout had to do to get it was write to NASA for them on loan as part of a program to make limited lunar sample material temporarily available to schools.

  15. #15
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    One day back in the 70s, I think was, I held a piece of moon rock in one hand and an aluminium rod from Surveyor 3 in the other hand.

    They had been given to the director of Wellington's observatory. He used to pop into my camera store for a chat now and then, and came in one day clutching this ordinary-looking piece of aluminium to his chest as if it was reather precious, so I asked him what it was. On being told, I had to ask, "Can I hold it, please?" and he answered, "Yes, and I've got a piece of moon rock here too if you'd like to hold that!"

    The piece of rock was about the size of two or three pinheads and encased in a zip-lock plastic bag, but hey, who's complaining?

  16. #16
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    Apart from the Lunar samples that were sent to Australia for research (and so far as I know are still here at the Australian National University), there are several other 'display' pieces of moon rock in Australia.

    In addition to our piece of the "Goodwill Rock", Australia also received a small sample of Moon rock form Apollo 11, encased in lucite and mounted on a plaque in a similar manner to the "Goodwill" piece. The Apollo 11 sample was for many years publicly displayed in Parliament House (home of our Federal Government) in Canberra and is now on display at the NASA DSN tracking station at Tidbinbilla, near Canberra. The station's Visitors' Centre also has another, larger Lunar sample (about the size of a goose egg) on display: a loan from NASA that was carried to Australia by astronaut John Young Moon as an Apollo 25th Anniversary gift.

    The "Goodwill" sample was displayed at the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney from 1988-2000, before being toured with the "To Mars and Beyond" exhibition. It is now on display at the "National Museum of Australia" in Canberra. The Powerhouse Museum currently has on display a much larger, egg-size, Lunar sample, also on loan from NASA. In addition, there is one Australian teacher who has been granted NASA permission to hold a set of those educational display samples mentioned by Waarthog, for use in educational programs around the country.

    So there are four lunar samples on public display in Australia-and while these samples are lucite encased, they could easily be examined by geologists if the necessity arose. Hardly "secretive and locked away"!

    Oh yes, and althoguh we got Moon rocks, Australia didn't receive any wheat from the US. Actually, we sold our wheat to the Soviet union, too.....so maybe we were in on the conspiracy after all!

  17. #17
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    Oh yes, and althoguh we got Moon rocks, Australia didn't receive any wheat from the US. Actually, we sold our wheat to the Soviet union, too.....so maybe we were in on the conspiracy after all!
    Of course, EVERYBODY's in! That's the whole point of this conspiracy. EVERYTHING and EVERYONE is a conspiracy element. Though some people know about it. wooooooooo woooooooooo

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas
    Oh yes, and althoguh we got Moon rocks, Australia didn't receive any wheat from the US. Actually, we sold our wheat to the Soviet union, too.....so maybe we were in on the conspiracy after all!
    Of course, EVERYBODY's in! That's the whole point of this conspiracy. EVERYTHING and EVERYONE is a conspiracy element. Though some people know about it. wooooooooo woooooooooo
    Yup, there are two groups in the Apollo Hoax. Those that know because they figured it out, and those that know because they are being paid by NASA to cover it up or spread disinformation.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhantomWolf
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas
    Oh yes, and althoguh we got Moon rocks, Australia didn't receive any wheat from the US. Actually, we sold our wheat to the Soviet union, too.....so maybe we were in on the conspiracy after all!
    Of course, EVERYBODY's in! That's the whole point of this conspiracy. EVERYTHING and EVERYONE is a conspiracy element. Though some people know about it. wooooooooo woooooooooo
    Yup, there are two groups in the Apollo Hoax. Those that know because they figured it out, and those that know because they are being paid by NASA to cover it up or spread disinformation.
    And then there is that big group of stupid ordinary people who stll actually believe men landed on the moon :roll: . Yeay I'm stupid!!

  20. #20
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    I know this is an old thread and I have no idea if any of you folks even post here, but I was searching for information on the "Principal Investigators" of the lunar samples because...well...my father was one of them.

    His name is Roman A Schmitt (they spelled his name wrong on this list, a common mistake). I can tell you he was one of the most competent and honest men and his research played a key role in determining the age of the moon. Jack Schmitt (no relation) came to Oregon State University where my father taught and presented his Apollo 17 finding at the time. He even came to our house for dinner!


    NASA deniers flat [tick] me off.
    Last edited by PetersCreek; 2018-Oct-10 at 04:57 PM. Reason: Masked language

  21. #21
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    Hi Facimeor64, welcome to CQ. The Conspiracy Theory sub-forum isn't as active as it used to be, but it is always interesting to hear people's personal experiences. Thanks for sharing.

    A couple of seconds of googling and I found one of your father's papers.
    The origin and evolution of lunar high-Ti basalts: Periodic melting of a single source at Mare Tranquillitatis
    Five groups of basalts (A, B1, B2, B3, D) with three principal ages exist at the Apollo 11 site. These range from the low-K, low rare-earth element (REE) Groups B1, B2, and B3 to the low-K, high REE Group D basalts, to the high-K, high-REE Group A basalts. The Group A basalts are the only high-K (>0.2 wt% K2O) basalts, and youngest, with an age of 3.59 .02 Ga; Groups B3 and B1 are 3.71 .02 and 3.67 .02 Ga, respectively; Group B2 basalts are the oldest, at 3.85 .02 Ga. Group D basalts have not been dated. Fractionation modelling for major and trace elements indicates that the B1 basalts could have formed from a B3-like parent liquid. The B2 and D basalts can also be related to liquids similar to the B3-B1 composition through the presence of varying amounts of modal whitlockite. Thus, the entirety of low-K high-Ti basalts at Apollo 11 may have formed through melting of the same source region. The Group A basalt compositions are consistent with formation from a different parent liquid, with the composition of Apollo 11 orange glass. Modelling of major- and trace-elements in the Apollo 11 orange glass, indicate that the composition of the Group A basalts is consistent with fractionation of this glass, coupled with some assimilation (~7.5–15%) of an evolved KREEP-like material. However, this component is much younger than primitive KREEP (4.4 Ga). This “neuKREEP” component, similar to the composition of quartz monzodiorites described from the Apollo 15 site, probably represents evolved material formed during plutonism prior to the formation of the Apollo 11 orange glass liquid.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  22. #22
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    I just read this and want to congratulate Kiwi on the list he posted, that took an enormous amount of work.

  23. #23
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    I second bknight's positive comments: a fascinating list. To suggest that the conspirators managed to fool the likes of Tommy Gold, or Harold Urey, Ringwood, H.H. Hess,Arthur Eddington, for crying out loud, and host of others representing the cream of Earth scientists, is plain crazy. Then I guess "crazy" is a diagnostic feature of conspirators.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    I think I may have read that paper for Volcanology class when I was getting my bachelor of science in Geology.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    I think I may have read that paper for Volcanology class when I was getting my bachelor of science in Geology.
    My godfather growing up was Gordon Goles (a volcanologist, and also on the list above). My father and he worked together for many years, cooperating between OSU and UO. I was really only a lad at the time but still recall being in awe in the presence of such smart men.

    I have a few treasures handed down from my dad, not the least of which are a couple small samples of a lunar and also mars meteorite. Geology was one of my favorite sciences.

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