Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 63

Thread: China's Chang'e 4 mission

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,815

    China's Chang'e 4 mission

    We are going to hear more and more of this mission till its launch in 2018. In recognizance, I am creating this thread dedicated to it.

    For more information on the mission there is this video as well as here and here in our forum.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,815
    First information on an instrument from a foreign county to fly on Cheng'e 4 mission. It will be from Germany.

    http://www.uni-kiel.de/pressemeldung...ission&lang=en

    The tension was immense, but it was released this week, when the announcement came that one of Kiel University's instruments would be on board the next Chinese mission to the moon, Chang'E 4. "Kiel University is going to fly behind the moon!" said Jia Yu excitedly, a doctoral candidate at the Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics. Born in China, he will obtain his doctoral degree at Kiel University in a few months and then take over the project "Lunar Lander Neutron Dosimetry“ (LND). "We weren't sure if we would be able to implement a project like this one from Kiel with our colleagues at the National Space Science Center in Beijing", Yu reported. For this reason all those involved are even happier that it worked out.

    Now that the decision has been made, the team, led by Professor Robert Wimmer-Schweingruber, faces a major task. Within one year, the physicists in Kiel want to develop, build and mount the new LND experiment on the spaceship. In the final quarter of 2018, this should then fly to the moon. "A real challenge", said Lars Seimetz and Björn Schuster, the responsible mechanical and electronics engineers, "but really exciting. We can improve our designs that we developed for previous space missions." Radiation measuring instruments from Kiel have been used before in space missions by the American and European space agencies NASA and ESA: On board the Mars Rover "Curiosity", the team is currently collecting data on galactic and solar particle radiation and using it to research the potential radiation exposure for manned missions to Mars. The Kiel-based researchers provided four sensors for the "Solar Orbiter" space probe, which will also depart for space at the end of 2018 to research the sun. These sensors are to measure the spread and acceleration of solar particles. Successful experiments such as this one enabled the physicists to collect valuable experience which will be very useful when developing the LND.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,815
    Wow Chang'e is becoming an international mission. Above is an article of Germany's involvement, else where I have reported Russia's involvement. Now we have Sweden joining in

    http://gbtimes.com/china/sweden-join...-far-side-moon

    And Sweden’s presence is soon to be felt on the Moon once again, this time on another unprecedented journey - China’s Chang’e-4 mission to the untouched lunar far side, which is never visible from Earth due to gravitational or tidal locking.

    Following an agreement signed with the National Space Science Centre (NSSC) in Beijing, the Swedish Institute of Space Physics (IRF) in Kiruna in the country’s remote far north will provide one of the scientific payloads on the mission that will further our understanding of our celestial neighbour.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,815
    Leonard David, from Space.com reports on the goals of Cheng'e 4.

    http://www.space.com/32964-china-moo...nce-goals.html

    Lunar objectives

    CE-4 mission "propositional payloads" involve six on the lander, five payloads on the rover, and one payload on the telecommunication relay orbiter. The researchers report that the scientific objectives of CE-4 are many, including:

    Study the characteristics and the formation mechanism of lunar surface floating dust;
    To measure lunar surface temperature, analyzing its change with time and in different light conditions;
    Measure the chemical compositions of lunar rocks and soils and study their distribution;
    Carry out lunar surface low-frequency radio astronomical observation and research;
    Identify the structure of cosmic rays, and to find the possible original position for these cosmic rays;
    Observe the independent kilometer wave burst event from the high layer of the solar corona, investigate its radiation characteristics and mechanism, and to explore the evolution and transport of coronal mass ejection (CME) between the Sun and Earth.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,815
    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    Wow Chang'e is becoming an international mission. Above is an article of Germany's involvement, else where I have reported Russia's involvement. Now we have Sweden joining in
    Sorry I did not provide the link for the Russian involvement.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,815
    More details on what three European countries are contributing to the mission.

    http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/988258.shtml

    The low-frequency radio spectrometer, developed in the Netherlands, will be installed on the Chang'e-4 relay satellite. The Dutch and Chinese low-frequency radio instruments will conduct unique scientific studies such as measuring auroral radio emissions from the large planets in the solar system, determining the radio background spectrum at the Earth-Moon L2 points, creating a new low-frequency map of the radio sky, and detecting bright pulsars and other radio transient phenomena.

    "The Chinese and Dutch low-frequency radio spectrometers on the lander and relay satellite of Chang'e-4 might help us detect the 21-cm hydrogen line radiation and study how the earliest stars were ignited and how our cosmos emerged from darkness after the Big Bang," said Chen Xuelei, an astronomer with the National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

    The rover will also carry an advanced small analyzer for neutrals, developed in Sweden, to study the interaction between solar winds and the moon surface.

    And a neutron dosimeter, developed in Germany, will be installed on the lander to measure radiation at the landing site. Scientists say it is essential to investigate the radiation environment on the lunar surface, in preparation for human missions to the moon.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,815
    Emily Lakdawalla's update on Chang'e 4. In her statement "Chang'e 5 should launch and return in 2018, before the Chang'e 4 mission." she got the year wrong. Chang'e 5 is supposed to launch next year - 2017.

    http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily...r-change4.html

    The future Chang'e 4 lunar farside landing mission is rapidly taking shape. As I described earlier this year, a relay orbiter will launch in 2018 for the Moon-Earth L2 point and a lander and rover (upgraded from Chang'e 3) will follow six months later. Now the mission's team is coming to a consensus on the landing location, as well as on the mission's instrument package. But, to the surprise of geologists in the international lunar science community, the package does not seem to include an instrument dedicated to studying the elemental chemistry of those never-before-sampled farside rocks.

    News on Chang'e 4 has been coming out from a variety of sources, including mainstream media articles like this one (in Chinese), as well a paper by Wang Qiong and Liu Jizhong, recently accepted in Acta Astronautica: "A Chang’e-4 mission concept and vision of future Chinese lunar exploration activities." The launch dates quoted in the Wang and Liu article have shifted forward in time a little bit since my last article, with the relay orbiter launch expected "in the end of 2018" and the lander/rover "in the first half of 2019." Unlike missions to more distant worlds, Moon launch dates are fairly flexible and can usually be shifted a month at a time to ensure mission readiness and success at launch. I suspect Chang'e 4's schedule is sensitive to any changes to the Chang'e 5 sample return mission schedule. Chang'e 5 should launch and return in 2018, before the Chang'e 4 mission.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,815
    The Dutch are providing a Dutch-built radio antenna that will travel to the Moon aboard the Chinese Chang’e 4 satellite.

    http://www.universetoday.com/129664/...-moon-chinese/

    As it stands, very little is known about this part of the electromagnetic spectrum. As a result, the Dutch radio antenna could be the first to provide information on the development of the earliest structures in the Universe. It is also the first instrument to be sent into space as part of a Chinese space mission.

    Alongside Heino Falcke, Marc Klein Wolt – the director of the Radboud Radio Lab – is one of the scientific advisors for the project. For years, he and Falcke have been working towards the deployment of this radio antenna, and have high hopes for the project. As Professor Wolt said about the scientific package he is helping to create:

    “The instrument we are developing will be a precursor to a future radio telescope in space. We will ultimately need such a facility to map the early universe and to provide information on the development of the earliest structures in it, like stars and galaxies.”

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,815
    Ever wondered how a Dutch instrument is going to the moon on Cheng'e 4. It all started with a five-year old boy, who was impressed by images of an astronaut on the moon. The rest as they say is history.

    http://www.ru.nl/english/about-us/ou.../heino-falcke/

    It’s safe to say that a generous portion of perseverance was needed for the plan. ‘I always invest a part of my time in crazy projects. Usually, they turn out to work eventually’, Falcke smiles. ‘That is also what happened here. Totally unexpected, we received a call from China last year, telling us that they would love to collaborate. From that moment on, all the plans accelerated again. Luckily we were able to move quickly. In Europe, this project would take a decade, but now we only have two years. This means that we will have to adjust our ambitions a bit, but still we grasped this opportunity with both hands.’

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,815
    Saudi Arabia has agreed to contribute at least one of the experiments to be taken to the far side of the moon by Cheng'e-4.

    Chang'e-4 was a backup to Chang'e-3 but with all the extra instruments foreign countries are contributing to the mission you will expect the payload to be heavier. But will it require a rocket 7 times more powerful than what launched Chang'e-3. My hunch is China has a few surprises for us and we will have to wait till the mission is in progress to find out. The lander will definitely be bigger. Will the rover too be made bigger to carry all the extra experiments to overcome the problems Yutu had.

    https://spacewatchme.com/2017/03/sau...-moon-mission/

    As part of his six week-long tour of Asian countries, King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud of Saudi Arabia has presided over a major space agreement between his Kingdom and Asia’s leading space power, China.

    This prominent agreement is a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the King Abdulaziz City of Science and Technology (KACST) and the China National Space Administration (CNSA) for Saudi Arabia to contribute to and participate in the Chinese-led Chang’e-4 Moon mission, scheduled to be launched in 2018.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,815
    Now confirmation of a Swedish instrument has been handed over to China to be integrated with the Chang’e 4 rover. With the other international instruments also to be integrated into the rove it confirms my suspicion that the rover will be bigger than Yutu.

    http://www.irf.se/Topical/Press/?dbf...0Moon&dbsec=P3

    On April 7, the Swedish Institute of Space Physics successfully delivered the flight model of the Advanced Small Analyzer for Neutrals (ASAN) instrument to the National*Space*Science*Center of the*Chinese*Academy*of*Sciences in Beijing, China. The ASAN instrument will be launched at the end of 2018 onboard the Chinese Chang'e 4 mission to the Moon. Chang'e 4 consists of an orbiter, lander and rover.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,815
    China hope's to experiment with growing crops on the moon.

    http://www.china.org.cn/china/2017-0...t_41023534.htm

    "
    Scientists in China have unveiled multiple tasks they plan to carry out as part of the lunar exploration program at the just-concluded Global Space Exploration Conference (GLEX 2017) in Beijing.

    Among them, the creation of a "mini ecosystem on the moon's surface" is due to be led by researchers with Chongqing University, reports the Chongqing Morning Post.

    The "mini ecosystem" will actually be contained in an 18X16cm cylinder.

    It's due to be put on the moon's surface as part the Chang'e-4 mission in 2018, according to Professor Xie Gengxin, head designer of the project."


    Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,815
    More details from Andrew Jones on China's plan to gorw crops on the moon.

    http://gbtimes.com/china/forget-stra...silkworms-moon

    "Research teams with Chongqing University have developed an 18 cm high, 3 kg aluminium alloy mini-ecosystem which will incubate the biological payloads.

    “The container will send potatoes, arabidopsis seeds and silkworm eggs to the surface of the Moon. The eggs will hatch into silkworms, which can produce carbon dioxide, while the potatoes and seeds emit oxygen through photosynthesis," Zhang Yuanxun, chief designer of the container, told the Chongqing Morning Post.

    Temperature control and energy supply are the biggest challenges, People's Daily quotes Zhang as saying.

    The experiment will be livestreamed and is expected to contribute to research towards establishing future lunar habitats."

    Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,815
    Germany has signed an agreement with China to participate in the Chang'e 4 mission. Though what form the participation will be was not stated.

    https://sputniknews.com/science/2017...i-exploration/

    "China National Space Administration has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the German Space Agency regarding cooperation on the Chang’e 4 lunar probe following the meeting between Chinese President Xi Jinping and German Chancellor Angela Merkel on Wednesday.

    "Both sides [China and Germany] will follow the path of open, innovative and win-win in their cooperation, deepening their partnership in hi-tech fields of space, smart manufacturing and industrial internet," Xi said at the joint press conference with Merkel."

    Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,815
    Want to send a message to the moon? It will possible in the near future.

    http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/20..._136840425.htm

    China will solicit 20,000 messages which will be sent into space by a relay satellite for the Chang'e-4 lunar probe, according to China's Lunar and Deep Space Exploration Center.

    The relay satellite will be launched in the first half of 2018 and Chang'e-4 lunar probe in the latter half of next year, according to the center affiliated with the China National Space Administration.

    People all over the world can follow the WeChat account "slecbj" to submit their wishes from Dec. 19, 2017, to March 6, 2018.

    The Chang'e-4 lunar probe will undertake the first ever soft landing on the far side of the moon and conduct in situ and roving detection and relay communication at the Earth-Moon Lagrangian 2 (L2) point, according to the center.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    2,158
    Why would they be growing crops on the Lunar surface? It's difficult to tell where the Chinese are going, their program is more open unlike the Soviet years but there is still a secretive element to it and even they China has made large steps in terms of pace, its almost glacial, they have no intention of 'racing'. The news agency Associated Press once reported that Zhuang Fenggan, vice chairman of the China Association of Sciences, declared that Chinese would create a permanent lunar base with the intent of mining the lunar soil for Helium-3 (the theory is this would fuel nuclear fusion plants on Earth) Many people speculated Chinese long term goals were either a space station or maybe Mars but here it looks like they are look to studying possibility for Colonization of the Moon?

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,815
    Quote Originally Posted by Launch window View Post
    Why would they be growing crops on the Lunar surface? It's difficult to tell where the Chinese are going, their program is more open unlike the Soviet years but there is still a secretive element to it and even they China has made large steps in terms of pace, its almost glacial, they have no intention of 'racing'. The news agency Associated Press once reported that Zhuang Fenggan, vice chairman of the China Association of Sciences, declared that Chinese would create a permanent lunar base with the intent of mining the lunar soil for Helium-3 (the theory is this would fuel nuclear fusion plants on Earth) Many people speculated Chinese long term goals were either a space station or maybe Mars but here it looks like they are look to studying possibility for Colonization of the Moon?
    They are using plants to generate oxygen and food. Even the proposed CSS has one module dedicated for growing food and generating oxygen.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,815
    Latest news from China confirms both parts of the Chang'e 4 mission will launch this year.

    http://www.moondaily.com/reports/Chi..._2018_999.html

    2018 could see a breakthrough in lunar exploration: China is planning a mission that, if successful, will see a space landing on the far side of the moon for the first time.

    The first part of China's Chang'e 4 space mission will launch in June. A Long March 4C rocket will carry a 425kg relay satellite and station it some 60,000km behind the moon. A second launch later in the year will send a lander and rover to the far side of the moon, guided to a safe landing by the satellite.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,815
    With the the launch date of Chang'e-4 drawing ever closer, the Chinese scientist are still busy testing the rover.

    https://gbtimes.com/testing-on-china...ion-for-launch

    The lander and rover which China aims to soft-land on the far side of the Moon have entered mechanical environmental testing as preparations for launch in late 2018 step up.

    The China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASC), the main contractor for the Chinese space programme, stated yesterday that testing had started following recently completed experiments.

    The process will typically involve verifying system performance while experiencing vibrations similar to those during launch and flight as well as thermal vacuum and anechoic chamber tests.

    Chang'e-4 was originally manufactured at the same time as Chang'e-3 spacecraft in order to provide a backup. Testing for Chang'e-4 will also likely involve lunar landing and lunar surface simulation for the six-wheeled rover, as with the previous mission.

    CASC states that new technologies have added additional challenges to the development of China's fourth lunar mission, and includes the integration of payloads provided by international cooperation.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,815
    The relay satellite for Cheng'e 4 to be launched in May or June this year, will also bring along a pair of microsatellites.

    https://gbtimes.com/change-4-lunar-f...y?cat=business

    China's two-launch Chang'e-4 mission to the far side of the Moon will include a pair of microsatellites to be placed in lunar orbit to test low frequency radio astronomy and space-based interferometry.

    The pair, unofficially named DSLWP-A1 and DSLWP-A2, have a mass of about 45 kg each with dimensions of 50 x 50 x 40 cm and will launch along with a relay satellite in May or June this year.

    Equipped with low frequency antennae and receivers, the astronomy objectives of DSLWP-A1 and A2 will be to observe the sky at the very low frequency part of the electromagnetic spectrum (1MHz-30MHz), corresponding to wavelengths of 300m-10m, with the aim of learning about energetic phenomena from celestial sources.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,815
    Change'4 is going through thermal vacuum testing in readiness for its flight later this year.

    https://gbtimes.com/change-4-lander-...n?cat=business

    China's Chang'e-4 lunar lander and rover spacecraft are undergoing vacuum testing ahead of their pioneering December mission to touch down on the far side of the Moon.

    The thermal vacuum tests are to the last of a range of space environment tests which began in January, and include vibroacoustic, electromagnetic and mechanical vibration tests, before the Chang'e-4 spacecraft can leave the Assembly, Integration and Testing (AIT) Centre.

    Thermal vacuum testing simulates the extreme ranges of hot and cold temperatures to be experienced by the spacecraft on its mission.

    On the Moon's surface temperatures can reach up to around 120 degrees Celsius during sunlight, and as low as -170 degrees Celsius during the lunar nights.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,815
    China is running a competition to name Chang'e 4 relay satellite. The results will be known on China's annual Space Day - April 24th.

    https://gbtimes.com/change-4-relay-s...science-centre

    A competition has been opened to name the communications relay satellite that will soon launch to facilitate the pioneering Chang'e-4 lunar far side landing mission in late 2018.

    The Chang'e-4 relay satellite is a necessary part of a lunar far side landing mission, as that area of the Moon never faces the Earth. The satellite will be be placed at a Lagrange Point beyond the Moon to provide a communications link between the lunar lander and rover and Earth.

    The National Space Science Centre (NSSC) under the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) last month launched (Chinese) the naming contest for the satellite, running from March 27 to April 15.

    The winning entry will be announced on China's third annual Space Day, on April 24.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,815
    We might have flowers blooming on the moon at the end of the year!!!!

    http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/201..._137106440.htm

    China's Chang'e-4 lunar probe is expected to do many things unprecedented in space history after it launches later this year, such as touching down softly on the far side of the Moon and taking the first flowers to blossom on the lifeless lunar surface.

    The probe will carry a tin containing seeds of potato and arabidopsis, a small flowering plant related to cabbage and mustard, and probably some silkworm eggs to conduct the first biological experiment on the Moon.

    The "lunar mini biosphere" experiment was designed by 28 Chinese universities, led by southwest China' s Chongqing University, a conference on scientific and technological innovation of Chongqing Municipality has heard.
    An article in QUARTZ that has a picture of the tin that will contain the silkworm and plants.

    https://qz.com/1251821/chinas-pionee...and-silkworms/

    Almost half a century ago, the first human landed on the moon, marking “a giant leap for mankind.” This year, China is sending seeds of plants and insects there.

    Seeds of potatoes and arabidopsis—a small flowering plant belonging to the mustard family—along with silkworm cocoons, will hitch a ride with the Chang’e-4 lander and rover on China’s first probe to the far side of the moon in December. China hopes to create a “mini lunar biosphere” as part of its research for building a lunar base and even the possibility of long-term residence on the moon.

    The plants and insects, contained in an 18-cm-tall (7 inches) bucket-like tin with air, water, and soil, will create an ecological system. A tube inside the tin will direct natural light from the moon for photosynthesis, and the plants will then emit oxygen which feeds the silkworms once they hatch. The insects will then create carbon dioxide and waste, which in turn aids the plants’ growth, according to scientists at Chongqing University who are leading the project. The team hopes to live broadcast (link in Chinese) the progress of the organisms.
    Last edited by selvaarchi; 2018-Apr-13 at 11:13 AM.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,815
    China has given names to Chang'e-4 relay satellite and the two microsatellites (which will orbit the moon).

    https://gbtimes.com/change-4-lunar-f...-the-milky-way

    China's Chang'e-4 relay satellite, which will launch next month to facilitate communications with a lander and rover on the lunar far side, has been named Queqiao - or magpie bridge - from a Chinese myth.

    The name was announced by the China National Space Administration (CNSA) in Harbin, northeast China, on Tuesday April 24 at an event marking the advent of China's third Space Day.

    The name comes the Chinese myth and love story of the Weaver Girl and the Cowherd. Separated by the Silver River, which symbolises the Milky Way, the lovers are reunited for one day each year by a bridge formed by a flock of magpies - Queqiao (鹊桥) - allowing them to cross the heavens.

    Two microsatellites, which will accompany the launch in May and be placed in lunar orbit, also received names.

    These are Longjiang-1 and Longjiang-2 (龙江一号 and 龙江二号), meaning Dragon River 1 and 2. The developer of the microsatellites is the Harbin Institute of Technology, situated in the capital of Heilongjiang (Black Dragon River) Province. The Heilongjiang river is also known as the Amur.

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,815
    China is putting the infrastructure in place to launch the Chang'e-4 relay satellite.

    https://gbtimes.com/chinas-yuanwang-...h?cat=business

    China's Yuanwang 7 space tracking vessel is heading for waters in the Pacific Ocean ready to support the launch of the relay satellite which will facilitate the Chang'e-4 lunar far side lander and rover mission.

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,815
    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    China is putting the infrastructure in place to launch the Chang'e-4 relay satellite.

    https://gbtimes.com/chinas-yuanwang-...h?cat=business
    Now Yuanwang 6 space tracking vessel has set sail to also support Chang'e-4 relay satellite launch.

    https://gbtimes.com/change-4-yuanwan...h?cat=business

    The Yuanwang 6 space tracking vessel has left port in preparation to support the launch of the relay satellite required for China's ambitious Chang'e-4 lunar far side landing.

    The Queqiao communications relay satellite is scheduled to launch from the Xichang Satellite Launch Centre on May 21 or later via a Long March 4C rocket, heading for an orbit beyond the Moon.

    Yuanwang 6 will track the spacecraft after launch from southwest China as it heads into orbit, observing its trajectory and providing survey and control capabilities.

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,815
    Launch is all set for next week. 21st of May.

    http://spacenews.com/china-preparing...ellite-may-21/

    China is set to launch a relay satellite to the second Earth-moon Lagrange point May 21, in a necessary precursor to the planned Chang’e-4 soft-landing on the lunar far side late in the year.

    Chang’e-4 is the backup to the Chang’e-3 mission which put a lander and rover on Mare Imbrium in late 2013. Following that success, the lunar craft have been repurposed for a pioneering landing on the moon’s far side.

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,815
    Aboard the relay satellite will be a Dutch instrument and it will not be pointed at the moon!!!

    http://www.moondaily.com/reports/Dut...ssion_999.html

    On 21 May 2018, the Chinese space agency will launch the relay satellite Chang'e 4 to an orbit behind the Moon. On board will be a Dutch radio antenna, the Netherlands Chinese Low-Frequency Explorer (NCLE). The radio antenna is the first Dutch-made scientific instrument to be sent on a Chinese space mission, and it will open up a new chapter in radio astronomy.

    The is instrument developed and built by engineers from ASTRON, the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy in Dwingeloo, the Radboud Radio Lab of Radboud University in Nijmegen, and the Delft-based company ISIS. With the instrument, astronomers want to measure radio waves originating from the period directly after the Big Bang, when the first stars and galaxies were formed.

    Why is it so important for the measuring instruments to be placed behind the Moon? Professor of Astrophysics from Radboud University and ASTRON Heino Falcke: "Radio astronomers study the universe using radio waves, light coming from stars and planets, for example, which are not visible with the naked eye.

    "We can receive almost all celestial radio wave frequencies here on Earth. We cannot detect radio waves below 30 MHz, however, as these are blocked by our atmosphere. It is these frequencies in particular that contain information about the early universe, which is why we want to measure them."

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,815
    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    Aboard the relay satellite will be a Dutch instrument and it will not be pointed at the moon!!!

    http://www.moondaily.com/reports/Dut...ssion_999.html
    More information on the Dutch instrument from the Science Magazine.

    http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/...smic-dark-ages

    On 21 May, China plans to launch a satellite with a vital but unglamorous mission. From a vantage point beyond the moon, Queqiao, as the satellite is called, will relay data from Chang'e 4, a lander and rover that is supposed to touch down on the lunar far side before the end of the year. But a Dutch-made radio receiver aboard Queqiao will attempt something more visionary. In the quiet lunar environment, it will listen to the cosmos at low frequencies that carry clues to the time a few hundred million years after the big bang, when clouds of hydrogen gas were spawning the universe's first stars.

    The mission is a proof of principle for other efforts to take radio astronomy above the atmosphere, which blocks key radio frequencies, and far from earthly interference. "Putting the whole show into space is extremely appealing," says Michael Hecht of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Haystack Observatory in Westford, whose team is also developing small radio satellites that could be used to probe the cosmos. For Europe's astronomers, it is also a test of cooperation with China, something their U.S. counterparts at NASA are barred from doing.

    The Netherlands-China Low-Frequency Explorer (NCLE) project stems from a 2015 Dutch trade mission to China, during which the two countries agreed to collaborate on space missions. The Netherlands is strong in radio astronomy: Its Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) stretches across much of northern Europe. NCLE Principal Investigator Heino Falcke, of Radboud University in the Netherlands, has long advocated a "LOFAR on the moon." China has an ambitious program of moon missions, so he jumped at the chance to take a first step. "We put together a proposal in 2 weeks," he says. Once funded, the team had just 1.5 years to build the instrument. "Half of the experiment is how you work together" Falcke says. Jinsong Ping of the National Astronomical Observatories of China in Beijing, who leads the Chinese team working on the NCLE, agrees: "It is really challenging both sides. … Different culture, habit, language, working manner."

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,815
    Queqiao communications relay satellite has been launched. Once it reaches the L2 point in 8 days, it will be put through number of tests to ensure it will be ready for Chang'e 4.

    https://arstechnica.com/science/2018...e-to-the-moon/

    China's space agency has taken a critical first step toward an unprecedented robotic landing on the far side of the Moon. On Monday, local time, the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation launched a Long March 4C rocket from the Xichang Satellite Launch Center. Although it did not broadcast the launch, the Chinese space agency said it went smoothly, according to the state news service Xinhua.

    "The launch is a key step for China to realize its goal of being the first country to send a probe to soft-land on and rove the far side of the Moon," Zhang Lihua, manager of the relay satellite project, told Xinhua.

    About 25 minutes after the launch, the Queqiao spacecraft separated from the rocket's upper stage, and began a trip toward a halo orbit of the Earth-Moon Lagrange Point L2. Over the next six months, the 425kg spacecraft will undergo tests to ensure it will function properly as a communications relay.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •