Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 61 to 68 of 68

Thread: Is Planet Nine almost certain, probable, possible or unlikely?

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Falls Church, VA (near Washington, DC)
    Posts
    8,074
    In 1992, the discovery of a small object unlocked a big secret: that the solar system was far more vast than we’d ever imagined. Before, we’d only confirmed the existence of lonely, strange, cold Pluto, in a region of space called the Kuiper Belt. The Kuiper Belt is a grouping of icy objects located in an area just outside the orbit of Neptune—like a colder, more watery asteroid belt. Up until 1992, it had been strictly theoretical because no one had observed anything beyond Pluto. The discovery of 1992 QB1 marked only the second time an object in the Kuiper Belt had been found. In the next few years, discoveries of these small, cold worlds snowballed—80+ were found between 1992 and 1999, and hundreds are known today. With the outer solar system surveys at Mauna Kea and La Palma observatories in the 1990s, we finally began to unlock the “third zone” of the solar system as something more than theoretical.
    First the author says the solar system was more vast than we had ever imagined, and then he acknowledges that there were theories about stuff beyond Pluto. That means we had imagined it. Yet another example of questionable writing by a popular media writer.

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    2,267
    Quote Originally Posted by Hornblower View Post
    First the author says the solar system was more vast than we had ever imagined, and then he acknowledges that there were theories about stuff beyond Pluto. That means we had imagined it. Yet another example of questionable writing by a popular media writer.
    Pedants' Corner

    If you assume the word "we" refers to a section or grouping of people who had never imagined this, but there are other people who are not members of this group, strictly speaking it makes grammatical sense.

    It's not what he or she meant though !

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,195
    How much nicer it would have been for the author to have presented the history of the Belt’s existence by going from early speculations by several scientists to real hypotheses, which doesn’t compare as well as is suggested for this new region.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    6,344
    Now another explanation for the erratic movement of these worlds in the Kuiper belt. This explanation does not need a planet 9.

    https://www.colorado.edu/today/2018/...ective-gravity

    Bumper car-like interactions at the edges of our solar system—and not a mysterious ninth planet—may explain the the dynamics of strange bodies called “detached objects,” according to a new study.

    CU Boulder Assistant Professor Ann-Marie Madigan and a team of researchers have offered up a new theory for the existence of planetary oddities like Sedna—an icy minor planet that circles the sun at a distance of nearly 8 billion miles. Scientists have struggled to explain why Sedna and a handful of other bodies at that distance look separated from the rest of the solar system.

    One theory suggests that an as-of-yet-unseen ninth planet lurking beyond Neptune may have kicked up the orbits of these detached objects.

    But Madigan and her colleagues calculated that the orbits of Sedna and its ilk may result from these bodies jostling against each other and space debris in the outer solar system.

    “There are so many of these bodies out there. What does their collective gravity do?” said Madigan of the Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences (APS) and JILA. “We can solve a lot of these problems by just taking into account that question.”

    The researchers presented their findings today at a press briefing at the 232nd meeting of the American Astronomical Society, which runs from June 3-7 in Denver, Colorado.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    1,649
    On the other hand, here is a suggestion that Sedna et al may have been perturbed by numerous planetoids:
    https://www.colorado.edu/today/2018/...ective-gravity
    SHARKS (crossed out) MONGEESE (sic) WITH FRICKIN' LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    4,265
    One thing about that citizen science project looking for the planet, if anyone succeeds and flags up the thing will they be allowed to become immortal?

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    2,267
    Quote Originally Posted by peteshimmon View Post
    One thing about that citizen science project looking for the planet, if anyone succeeds and flags up the thing will they be allowed to become immortal?
    Presuming you mean will they name the planet after its discoverer, that seems unlikely to me. The IAU has sole competency in recognising planet names. All other recognised planets have names from ancient mythology.

    "Eris" was not called "Brown" for example, and that is only a dwarf planet. The naming of a proper large planet would come under even more scrutiny.

    Having said that, the discoverer will be immortal as the discoverer.

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,195
    Quote Originally Posted by kzb View Post
    Presuming you mean will they name the planet after its discoverer, that seems unlikely to me. The IAU has sole competency in recognising planet names. All other recognised planets have names from ancient mythology.
    Yes, there was once a planet named George. Perhaps Herschel didn't help things with this, though I kinda like it for some reason.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •