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Thread: Juno at Jupiter

  1. #151
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    Juno after two years is still doing very good science.

    https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=7075

    The depth to which the roots of Jupiter's famous zones and belts extend has been a mystery for decades. Gravity measurements collected by Juno during its close flybys of the planet have now provided an answer.

    "Juno's measurement of Jupiter's gravity field indicates a north-south asymmetry, similar to the asymmetry observed in its zones and belts," said Luciano Iess, Juno co-investigator from Sapienza University of Rome, and lead author on a Nature paper on Jupiter's gravity field.

    On a gas planet, such an asymmetry can only come from flows deep within the planet; and on Jupiter, the visible eastward and westward jet streams are likewise asymmetric north and south. The deeper the jets, the more mass they contain, leading to a stronger signal expressed in the gravity field. Thus, the magnitude of the asymmetry in gravity determines how deep the jet streams extend.

  2. #152
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    There's a video on spewtube describing the findings of the layers.

  3. #153
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    Some more new images of Jupiter by Juno.

    http://www.americaspace.com/2018/03/...ges-from-juno/

    As previously discussed on AmericaSpace, the Juno spacecraft has found that the giant planet Jupiter is full of big surprises; its interior composition and structure seem to be quite different, and its winds even more active, than originally thought. Now, giant cyclones at the planet’s poles have been seen in greater detail than ever before – they are not only stunning, but unique from atmospheric storms of any other planet in the Solar System, even other gas and ice giants. Also, other new data from Juno builds on previous findings, including showing that the planet’s strong winds penetrate deep into the atmosphere and last longer than any similar ones on our planet.


    “These astonishing science results are yet another example of Jupiter’s curve balls, and a testimony to the value of exploring the unknown from a new perspective with next-generation instruments. Juno’s unique orbit and evolutionary high-precision radio science and infrared technologies enabled these paradigm-shifting discoveries,” said Scott Bolton, principal investigator of Juno from the Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio. “Juno is only about one-third the way through its primary mission, and already we are seeing the beginnings of a new Jupiter.”

    The new findings will be published in the March 8 edition of the journal Nature.

  4. #154
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    Citizen-scientists Matt Brealey and Gustavo B C gives another enhanced picture of Jupiter.

    https://www.space.com/40010-jupiter-...cientists.html

    A new photo shows a swirling maelstrom on Jupiter through rose-colored glasses.

    NASA's Juno spacecraft snapped the original picture on Feb. 7, during its 11th close flyby of the gas giant. At the time, Juno was 7,578 miles (12,195 kilometers) above Jupiter's cloud tops, at a latitude of 49.2 degrees north, NASA officials said.

    "Citizen scientist Matt Brealey processed the image using data from the JunoCam imager," NASA officials wrote in a photo description Friday (March 16). "Citizen scientist Gustavo B C then adjusted colors and embossed Matt Brealey's processing of this storm."

  5. #155
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    NASA's Juno Mission Provides Infrared Tour of Jupiter's North Pole.

    https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=7096

    Scientists working on NASA's Juno mission to Jupiter shared a 3-D infrared movie depicting densely packed cyclones and anticyclones that permeate the planet's polar regions, and the first detailed view of a dynamo, or engine, powering the magnetic field for any planet beyond Earth. Those are among the items unveiled during the European Geosciences Union General Assembly in Vienna, Austria, on Wednesday, April 11.

  6. #156
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    Emily Lakdawalla on the visual index to the images that JunoCam took during Juno's first 12 closest approaches to Jupiter. There are only 11 sets of images because no imaging was performed on Perijove 2.

    http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily...perijoves.html

    Seán Doran has made a cool visual index to the images that JunoCam took during Juno's first 12 closest approaches to Jupiter. The resolution on the click-to-enlarge version is high enough to clearly see which features Juno approached close to as it neared Jupiter's equator, but not quite high enough to see polar features. For those, you can go look at the version that Seán posted to Gigapan, which has lots more pixels (more than 3 billion!).

  7. #157
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    Some of the best pictures taken of Jupiter by Juno.

    https://www.vox.com/science-and-heal...great-red-spot

    The science is great and fascinating. But let’s be honest: We’re here for the pictures. And Juno is delivering unprecedented, beautiful portraits of Jupiter. The images processed by NASA and citizen scientists are arresting: one part van Gogh, one part Pillars of Creation. Jupiter’s clouds have a stormy, gauzy quality, like cream swirling in the largest imaginable cup of coffee. Add to that the awesome size of what’s in them: Even small details on Jupiter can be larger than the entire Earth.

    A note: The color and contrast in many of these photos have been enhanced to bring out details in Jupiter’s atmosphere. Much of this cool image processing is the work of citizen scientists, who crawl through the JunoCam archive and stitch together slices of Jupiter into beautiful, whole composite images, and color-correct them to bring out the details in the planet’s clouds. Here are some of the highlights.

  8. #158
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    The images are spectacular, but what scientific results has been obtained?

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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    Some of the best pictures taken of Jupiter by Juno.

    https://www.vox.com/science-and-heal...great-red-spot
    Hmm. Most science is laborious gathering of data. So we get more detail of Jupiter. And this will help tweak models. And the raw data surely hides discoveries, the significance of which will be decided by posterity.

  10. #160
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    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    The images are spectacular, but what scientific results has been obtained?
    NASA press release from a year ago
    Among the findings that challenge assumptions are those provided by Juno’s imager, JunoCam. The images show both of Jupiter's poles are covered in Earth-sized swirling storms that are densely clustered and rubbing together.

    “We're puzzled as to how they could be formed, how stable the configuration is, and why Jupiter’s north pole doesn't look like the south pole,” said Bolton. “We're questioning whether this is a dynamic system, and are we seeing just one stage, and over the next year, we're going to watch it disappear, or is this a stable configuration and these storms are circulating around one another?”

    Another surprise comes from Juno’s Microwave Radiometer (MWR), which samples the thermal microwave radiation from Jupiter’s atmosphere, from the top of the ammonia clouds to deep within its atmosphere. The MWR data indicates that Jupiter’s iconic belts and zones are mysterious, with the belt near the equator penetrating all the way down, while the belts and zones at other latitudes seem to evolve to other structures. The data suggest the ammonia is quite variable and continues to increase as far down as we can see with MWR, which is a few hundred miles or kilometers.
    Measurements of the massive planet’s magnetosphere, from Juno’s magnetometer investigation (MAG), indicate that Jupiter’s magnetic field is even stronger than models expected, and more irregular in shape. MAG data indicates the magnetic field greatly exceeded expectations at 7.766 Gauss, about 10 times stronger than the strongest magnetic field found on Earth.
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  11. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    IIRC wasn't one of the objectives to determine the size and make up of the core? Has this been addressed?

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    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    IIRC wasn't one of the objectives to determine the size and make up of the core? Has this been addressed?
    Maybe - check out this thread from here.

  13. #163
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    Maybe - check out this thread from here.
    All I found is
    Now, early science results from the Juno mission, reported in 46 papers published today in Science and Geophysical Research Letters, are also painting a picture of a planet that doesn’t work the way scientists thought it would, from the tops of its clouds to a potentially oversized, eroding core.
    Not very positive, but that may be all we get/understand.

  14. #164
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    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    Not very positive, but that may be all we get/understand.
    Keep in mind the mission is not over, data is probably still being collected and analyzed, and papers take time to get published.
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  15. #165
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    Keep in mind the mission is not over, data is probably still being collected and analyzed, and papers take time to get published.
    Yes, I understand that but the mission is well over half complete, unless they extend it.

  16. #166
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    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    Yes, I understand that but the mission is well over half complete, unless they extend it.
    Do not loose hope as long as data is coming back to us on Earth. Take Rosetta data, it is still revealing details about comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko long after the mission ended.

    Then there is NASA’s Galileo spacecraft that after 20 years we discover it flew through water spraying out of Europa.. Sometimes the data is there but we do not know what to look for.

    And Jupiter is in the same. It will takes us years to understand all that data that is coming back.

  17. #167
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    More stunning pictures of Jupiter.

    https://www.businessinsider.my/jupit...8-5/?r=US&IR=T

    Juno, a tennis-court-size NASA probe at Jupiter, recently sent scientists a new batch of data, and the photos it included are even more stunning than the last set.

    NASA launched Juno toward Jupiter in August 2011 and the probe arrived in July 2016. Every 53.5 days since then, Juno has performed an orbital maneuver called a perijove.

    During a perijove, the probe dives over the north pole, screams past the Jovian cloud tops at 130,000 mph, and exits at the south pole. This highly elliptical loop helps protect the spacecraft’s electronics from Jupiter’s powerful radiation fields while also allowing it to record unprecedented observations.

    The $1-billion mission successfully pulled off its 13th perijove on May 24. Fans of the mission like graphic artist Seán Doran and NASA software engineer Kevin M. Gill have since processed the raw image files into colorful works of art.

  18. #168
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    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    Yes, I understand that but the mission is well over half complete, unless they extend it.
    Yes they have to 2021. Juno also solved a mystery that has puzzled scientist for 39 years.

    On Jupiter, lightning is clustered in the polar regions – it’s “inside-out” relative to Earth, Brown said.

    Though Jupiter receives 25 times less sunlight than Earth, the Sun’s rays do still heat up the gas giant’s equator more than the poles. The Sun’s heat creates just enough stability in the upper atmosphere around Jupiter’s equator to inhibit the rise of warm air, preventing lightning-bearing clouds from forming above the planet’s equator.

    Jupiter’s poles, which aren’t warmed by the Sun, have a less stable atmosphere, according to NASA, which allows warm gases to rise and create the recipe needed to produce lightning.

    “These discoveries could only happen with Juno,” Scott Bolton, another author on the paper said. “Our unique orbit allows our spacecraft to fly closer to Jupiter than any other spacecraft in history.”

    Luckily for the scientists, NASA is extending the Juno mission through July 2021.

  19. #169
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    Yes they have to 2021.
    More information on the extension of the mission.

    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/NA...ssion_999.html

    NASA has approved an update to Juno's science operations until July 2021. This provides for an additional 41 months in orbit around Jupiter and will enable Juno to achieve its primary science objectives.Juno is in 53-day orbits rather than 14-day orbits as initially planned because of a concern about valves on the spacecraft's fuel system. This longer orbit means that it will take more time to collect the needed science data.

  20. #170
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    Jeebus NASA what kind of a species are we if we can't even figure out if Jupiter's a planet or not.
    "Occam" is the name of the alien race that will enslave us all eventually. And they've got razors for hands. I don't know if that's true but it seems like the simplest answer."

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  21. #171
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    Quote Originally Posted by parallaxicality View Post
    Jeebus NASA what kind of a species are we if we can't even figure out if Jupiter's a planet or not.
    To the ancients, it was a wanderer, therefore a planet. On page 158, of Carl Sagan's Cosmos, he notes that Jupiter, in the infrared, gives off more energy than it receives from the Sun. It would be correct to consider Jupiter a star. If we knew only of terrestrial planet's, and had no knowledge of Jovian planets, what would we think about Jupiter if it was discovered today?

  22. #172
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    Quote Originally Posted by Superluminal View Post
    To the ancients, it was a wanderer, therefore a planet. On page 158, of Carl Sagan's Cosmos, he notes that Jupiter, in the infrared, gives off more energy than it receives from the Sun. It would be correct to consider Jupiter a star. If we knew only of terrestrial planet's, and had no knowledge of Jovian planets, what would we think about Jupiter if it was discovered today?
    It would NOT be correct to consider it a star. There is no fusion happening in Jupiter. The excess heat comes from other mechanisms. I don't think any credible scientists consider Jupiter a star or even a brown dwarf.

    Also, parallaxicality, where is it indicated that Jupiter's classification as a planet is in doubt?

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  23. #173
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    While volunteering at the Greenwich Observatory, I had a chat with one of the Juno mission team, and after some prodding, he admitted that if Jupiter didn't have a planetary core, it would be a sub-brown dwarf star. He also said that if that's the case, then everything we thought we knew about Solar System formation was wrong. Which, of course, it could be.
    "Occam" is the name of the alien race that will enslave us all eventually. And they've got razors for hands. I don't know if that's true but it seems like the simplest answer."

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  24. #174
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    Quote Originally Posted by CJSF View Post
    It would NOT be correct to consider it a star. There is no fusion happening in Jupiter. The excess heat comes from other mechanisms. I don't think any credible scientists consider Jupiter a star or even a brown dwarf.



    CJSF
    It was Carl Sagan, who said it would be correct to consider Jupiter a star. I have heard scientists refer to Jupiter as a black dwarf. I was speculating on what we would think of Jupiter if we had no knowledge of Jovian planets.

  25. #175
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    Juno reviles how Jupiter's moons create uniquely patterned aurora on the gas giant planet.

    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Ju...lanet_999.html

    New images from the Juno spacecraft show an unusual "footprint" of Jupiter's moons on their parent planet's aurorae. The data reveal that, rather than casting one "shadow" in Jupiter's aurorae, the moon Io - Jupiter's fifth - casts several, in a double wing-shaped pattern, while Jupiter's largest moon, Ganymede, casts a double shadow. T

    The stunning phenomenon of aurorae - beautiful colorful tendrils above the atmospheres of planets - occurs when electrically charged particles accelerate along the planet's magnetic field lines and then interact with the upper atmosphere.

    Jupiter's massive moons alter this phenomenon on the gas giant planet by directing the streams of charged particles. These large lunar bodies decorate the planet with unusual auroral patterns, previously seen as a bright spot "footprint" of each nearby moon in Jupiter's north and south hemispheres.

  26. #176
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    Ah but you didn't quote further down in the web page

    Alessandro Mura and colleagues use new images from the Juno spacecraft, which provide much more detailed data on the planet's aurorae, to reveal not just one "footprint" from the moon Io, but a trail of many evenly spaced bright spots that are roughly the size of the moon itself.
    So the multiple images are phenomenon that is long lasting enough to create multiple images.

  27. #177
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    Juno has given us a previously undiscovered volcano on Jupiter’s moon Io as well as wonderful pictures of the planet.

    https://www.businessinsider.my/nasa-...8-7/?r=US&IR=T

    It’s been a busy and exhilarating couple of months for scientists who study Jupiter – and space nerds fascinated by the gas giant.

    Yesterday, a team of researchers announced the discovery of 12 new Jovian moons, bringing Jupiter’s total up to 79. Last week, scientists revealed that data from NASA’s $1 billion Juno mission suggested there may be a previously undiscovered volcano on Jupiter’s moon Io. And last month, the team behind Juno figured out that Jupiter’s lighting is more similar to Earth’s than previously thought – which solved a 39-year-old mystery.

    But most excitingly, NASA confirmed in June that Juno, which has orbited Jupiter since July 2015, will cheat death for at least three more years. The probe was scheduled to crash into Jupiter’s clouds this month, but instead the mission has been extended until at least July 2021.

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