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Thread: Russia's future space plans

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    Russia's future space plans

    Latest plans from Russia look at them working with China and India.

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    Russia is to compete with India for small satellite business.

    http://spacenews.com/glavkosmos-seek...unch-provider/

    "Russian company Glavkosmos is seeking to become a major player in the small satellite launch market, with plans to launch up to 120 satellites as secondary payloads on three Soyuz missions this year.

    Glavkosmos, a subsidiary of Russian state space corporation Roscosmos, said June 14 that it will launch 72 small satellites as secondary payloads on the Soyuz-2.1a launch of the Kanopus-V-IK remote sensing satellite, scheduled for July 14 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan."

    Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk

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    The Space Review this week looks at Russia's rocket plans.

    http://www.thespacereview.com/article/3321/1

    Russia’s next-generation piloted spacecraft Federatsia, slated to fly Earth orbital and lunar missions in the 2020s, is getting a new rocket, the third in eight years. The rocket is also supposed to serve as a test bed for Russia’s SLS-class heavy-lift rocket, the development of which has been significantly accelerated in spite of Russia’s hard economic times. The latest changes are symptomatic of poor long-term planning and have brought to light conflicting opinions about the priorities of the country’s space program.

    When the Federatsia project was started in 2009, the plan was to launch the spacecraft with a brand new rocket (Rus-M) from the new Vostochny Cosmodrome in Russia’s Far East. In late 2011 the Russian space agency Roscosmos abandoned Rus-M in favor of the Angara-A5 rocket, which had been under development for almost 20 years, but ultimately debuted only in 2014. Originally scheduled to fly only from the military Plesetsk Cosmodrome, the rocket would now get a new pad at Vostochny and orbit an uncrewed version of Federatsia in 2021, with the first crewed mission in 2023 (see “The status of Russia’s human spaceflight program (part 2)”, The Space Review, February 27, 2017).

    The latest change in plans came when President Vladimir Putin held a meeting with top space officials at his resort in Sochi on May 22. While construction of the Angara pad at Vostochny will go ahead for uncrewed flights, the rocket will not be human-rated. Instead, Federatsia will rely on a new rocket called Soyuz-5 that inherits much technology from the Ukrainian-built Zenit rocket and will be launched from the existing Zenit pad at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. This will cause Federatsia’s schedule to slip by about one year. The new rocket should also fly commercial missions from Baikonur as well as the Sea Launch platform, and its first stage will go on to become a strap-on booster for Russia’s future heavy-lift launch vehicle. That should now see its first flight in 2027–2028 rather than 2035 as earlier planned.

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    Space News carries an article on the current state of the Russian space programme. Looks bleak but they are for the moment still have some strengths.

    http://spacenews.com/60-years-after-...lost-in-space/

    Just over 30 years after the Soviet Union launched the world’s first satellite, Sputnik 1, the nation that opened the space race stood on the precipice of a second golden age of space exploration. A major program, the Energia heavy booster rocket and the Buran space shuttle, was nearing completion — making its maiden flight in November 1988.

    Another three decades later, on the 60th anniversary of Sputnik 1, the Russian space program is a shadow of its Soviet predecessor. The Energia-Buran project, its last major accomplishment, flew just once before the fall of communism gutted Moscow’s space program. For nearly three decades now, the Russian space industry has been in a state of triage, teetering on collapse.

    But the Russian space program has consistently defied the dire predictions of those foretelling an imminent end to the program. Today, amid a major effort to reform and reorganize the Russian space industry under the new Roscosmos state corporation, there are signs that the bleeding has been slowed. But major questions about Russia’s future in space linger.

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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    Space News carries an article on the current state of the Russian space programme. Looks bleak but they are for the moment still have some strengths.

    http://spacenews.com/60-years-after-...lost-in-space/
    Sigh, this article is likely the closest to the truth.

    wrt. "...Russian space program has consistently defied the dire predictions of foretelling an imminent end to the program...".
    In hindsight, it's more like Russia availed itself of the bonanza associated with transporting American astronauts. Many (Americans too) used this (sort of justifiably) to deride NASA's efforts. Add the onslaught of purported absurd Russian plans from sites such as Sputnik News and it's easy to create that image. In fact, they do not seem to be going in the right direction. To me the frustration is that Russia's pedigree in space exploration and rocketry is of the highest order and it still has much of that expertise.

    The only good news for Russia is that if they worked on modern competitive rockets now, they would be ahead of most of the world which is still planning to deploy last generation's rockets.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 7cscb View Post
    The only good news for Russia is that if they worked on modern competitive rockets now, they would be ahead of most of the world which is still planning to deploy last generation's rockets.
    She not competitive at all: she use old fuel RG-1/LOX (against methane) and not reusable - it does not even use the modular design like the old rocket do (on the constraction of which it took 22 years). And now we abandoned that old project to make new, which according to plans requires 8 years - just as much as SpaceX needed to create a two rocket (Falcon 1 and 9) from scratch. And she does not provide for anything new.

    Before we talked about building a base on the Moon until 2015 - but for now first unmanned mission have already shifted 5 times (and maybe will shift several times more). We tried twice times to send a Mars mission, but both fail to left Earth orbit (1, 2). It's so sad to now we have only one science satellite, and we stuck in the middle of nowhere.

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    Russian President Vladimir Putin has given the go ahead to build a super heavy-lift launch vehicle (SHLLV).

    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Pu...hicle_999.html

    Russian President Vladimir Putin has signed a decree on the creation of a new Russian super heavy-lift launch vehicle (SHLLV), which is supposed to be used for missions to the Moon and Mars, Roscosmos Director General Igor Komarov told journalists on Thursday.

    "As for the super heavy-lift launch vehicle, there is one good piece of news - this week, the Russian president has signed a decree that launching facilities for a super heavy class space rocket will be created at the Vostochny Cosmodrome. Three stages are defined. In the first stage, in 2018-2019, an outline design should be made," he said.

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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    Russian President Vladimir Putin has given the go ahead to build a super heavy-lift launch vehicle (SHLLV).

    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Pu...hicle_999.html
    Selvaarchi,

    Sigh...This is from the infamous SpaceDaily and Sputnik. It seems every week or so you provide their links with fantabulous news wrt the Russian space program.

    What makes you believe this time it is legitimate?

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    Quote Originally Posted by 7cscb View Post
    Selvaarchi,

    Sigh...This is from the infamous SpaceDaily and Sputnik. It seems every week or so you provide their links with fantabulous news wrt the Russian space program.

    What makes you believe this time it is legitimate?
    Confirmation from this article from popularmechanics.com that Russian President Vladimir Putin signed off on Russia's next great rocket.

    https://www.popularmechanics.com/spa...-heavy-rocket/

    Just days before Elon Musk’s mighty Falcon Heavy roared into the skies, Russian President Vladimir Putin signed off on Russia's next great rocket. Rocosomos, the country's space agency, had been waiting years for this Kremlin decree, which gives the go-ahead for developing something known as “supertyazh.” Translated from Russian engineer jargon, that means a "really big rocket."

    Without much fanfare, Roscosmos posted a small announcement Friday saying Putin had signed the document “this week” for the development of the rocket in the super-heavy class, which will be based at the nation’s brand-new Vostochny Spaceport. Here's what we know about Russia's big dreams for a big rocket.

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