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Thread: What is the longest post-disaster impact that you find reasonable to prepare for?

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
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    14,582
    Where we live (western Europe) nature is gentle and still we build houses to withstand a full-on trebuchet (non-capitalised) attack. Even my detached garage is built like that. So our houses are way overprepared. On the other hand, most if not all people I know, including myself, do not prepare at all for disasters/cut-outs. Electricity normally is restored within a few hours, 48 hours is more than newsworthy. The country is densely populated and accessible, so clean water can always be brought in within a few hours. Conclusion: we're fine. And if something really really bad would ever happen here, it would be One Big Mess.

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    Northwest Washington State
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    So, the final report on Cascadia Rising exercise came out from FEMA with 2 major areas that need attention
    1) We need more ham operators
    2) The states need to update their guidance from folks being able to hold out for 3 days, to at least 2 weeks.

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
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    10,908
    Do you know how much storage that is?

    Most people I know can't store two weeks of food and WATER for their whole family just from simple logistics.
    Time wasted having fun is not time wasted - Lennon
    (John, not the other one.)

    "Honk! Honk-honk honkity-honk!" - Marx
    (Harpo, not the other one.)

  4. #64
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    Dec 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDon View Post
    Do you know how much storage that is?

    Most people I know can't store two weeks of food and WATER for their whole family just from simple logistics.
    Yep, as a matter of fact I do. And 2 weeks worth of water is just impossible in an apartment.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
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    10,908
    Well, in your case since you've talked about this before I knew YOU knew.

    That was mainly for the home audience.
    Time wasted having fun is not time wasted - Lennon
    (John, not the other one.)

    "Honk! Honk-honk honkity-honk!" - Marx
    (Harpo, not the other one.)

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    Depew, NY
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    I'd need like 60 liters of water for the family for 3 days. Since I keep 7L in the fridge at all times, and 36 in each car, plus 36 more in garage or basement, I almost have enough to feel comfortable.

    My wife thought this was nuts until we came home from camping to a water outage followed by a boil all water order for several days. On the upside, it was the middle of winter and even if we hadn't just come from camp with fair warning to refill our water before leaving, we could have boiled snow. The downside now is we have a dog so snow isn't a very attractive option now. I know, I know. A lot of other people have dogs in the neighborhood, but I could ignore that.

    Just making coffee is a pain in the butt if you have to boil water and then cool it for an electric drip coffee pot. You are better off with a percolator pot from camping.
    Solfe

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Caution: I may contain caffeine.

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    R.I. USA
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    For coffee , the melita filter is quite simple. Boil water and pour over grounds in a funnel. In a pinch, a napkin or paper towel will suffice, although I'm not fond of that approach. Like I said, desperation demands compromise, in season .
    For myself, the french press is easy and only requires water and coffee. Both methods make good coffee, and fast .
    About a mile from my home is a spring . Been there from colonial times at least, maybe earlier. Runs year round. They named it the
    " Balm of Life " spring. Get yer little red wagon and draw all the water you need. It is a treasure .

  8. #68
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    Aug 2005
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    Or just put the grounds in the water after boiling and strain afterwards using a seive or paper, or not if you want Turkish style.

    How much storage are you talking about, Don? (Asking for the audience at home.) Two weeks worth of food doesn't have to be too massy if you go with something very calorie dense. There's recipes out there for fatty survival bars, but expect to be constipated. The average can of condensed soup, thick stew, or chili runs 250-400 kcal, so figure 1 person needs 4-5/day if they're just sitting and waiting, less if they can stand to lose some weight, but more if they have to do some heavy survival work. But if one adds storable starches they can cook like rice, wheat flour, oatmeal, and shelf stable oils, they can reduce that. What do you recommend for a rough guideline?
    Et tu BAUT? Quantum mutatus ab illo.

  9. #69
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    Feb 2005
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    One should always make a list of the items needed to fit in to the emergency such as having the proper barber tools needed to give yourself and family that Mad Max look. Along with the shredded leathers and feathered cod pieces that show the neighbors your survival is not in question.
    Just because you're a genius doesn't make you a smart guy

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Depew, NY
    Posts
    9,870
    My go bag list has the following items:
    Oatmeal
    Peanut Butter
    Graham Crackers
    Slim Jims
    Ramen Noodles
    Trail Mix
    Candy, Drink Mix, Coffee, Cocoa, etc.

    Total cost of food - $50-75. It weighs about 2.5 kg per person for four people to carry. Or 10 kg for one person to carry. It's easily 5 days of food. 7 L of water in is in the fridge and ready to go in addition to the water in the car. 5 backpacks are ready to move, but except for knives, fire starter and first aid kits, are otherwise empty. I have a 120 liter backpack for clothing, but generally this is empty except for 5 flashlights, two hatchets and an axe. Realistically, thanks to rotation, I have some part of an extra 5 day supply of food at any given time. If we go by car or stay in place, we have more than 10 days. More than 20 if the grill and frozen stuff goes with us.

    Everyday I wash and fold two sets of clothes for each person (plus whatever needs to be done) and leave them on top of the drier. The kids pick one in the morning and put the second away when they get home from school, barring art class or lunch room accidents. My wife is of course oblivious to a set of her clothes on the drier. I merely ask if X still fits and put it away myself. Lather, rinse, repeat.

    The state has Emergency Detour Routes, A-F. A & B are to or from Canada. C and D are to and from PA along the lake, and E and F are for Rochester. A Route is likely the only valid escape route into Canada. Route B seems to be for Canadians coming south. The other four have better paths from my location, no matter the destination.

    I used to get shuffled around from different homes as a kid. I don't anticipate problems, this is just how my mind works.
    Last edited by Solfe; 2017-Mar-22 at 02:17 AM.
    Solfe

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Caution: I may contain caffeine.

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