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Thread: Is this a asteroid

  1. #1
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    Is this a asteroid

    Its magnetic i found it on a lake erie beach20170226_141026.jpg20170226_141009.jpg20170226_140954.jpg

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  2. #2
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    Is this a asteroid

    20170226_141026.jpg20170226_141009.jpg20170226_140954.jpg

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  3. #3
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    Do you mean "meteorite"?

    Edit: PS, welcome to CosmoQuest Forum.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by 01101001 View Post
    Do you mean "meteorite"?
    Yes sorry

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  5. #5
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    hard to tell maybe this will help you decide

    http://meteorites.wustl.edu/check-list.htm


    also and expanded checklist

    http://meteorites.wustl.edu/realities.htm


    note point 41 - found on a beach
    Last edited by Glutomoto; 2017-Feb-27 at 12:41 AM. Reason: added another link

  6. #6
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    Frankly, that looks a little like a construction brick fragment, eroded by waves on a stoney beach.

    e6188931d7a414fca2233046478cc9cb.jpg

    Is it uncharacteristically heavy for its size?
    Stoney meteorites are unusually dense.
    Last edited by DaveC426913; 2017-Feb-27 at 04:27 AM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveC426913 View Post
    Frankly, that looks a little like a construction brick fragment, eroded by waves on a stoney beach.

    e6188931d7a414fca2233046478cc9cb.jpg

    Is it uncharacteristically heavy for its size?
    Stoney meteorites are unusually dense.
    OP says it's magnetic, so probably has a high iron content.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveC426913 View Post
    Frankly, that looks a little like a construction brick fragment, eroded by waves on a stoney beach.

    e6188931d7a414fca2233046478cc9cb.jpg

    Is it uncharacteristically heavy for its size?
    Stoney meteorites are unusually dense.
    Its to heavy to be a brick

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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    OP says it's magnetic, so probably has a high iron content.
    OP, how do you know it is magnetic?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Mendenhall View Post
    OP, how do you know it is magnetic?
    A magnet sticks to it the red on it is rust

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  11. #11
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    See if the reverse is true and if a needle or iron filings sticks to the stone.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spacedude View Post
    See if the reverse is true and if a needle or iron filings sticks to the stone.
    No it doesnt attract metal.. i put a round refrigerator magnet on its side and the rock pulls it but its not a strong connection

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  13. #13
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    OK, so it's not magnetic; it's ferrous.

  14. #14
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    It would be cool to get a measurement of its density.

    1] Weigh it (in grams).
    2] Measure its volume.
    - Put a small bucket or pitcher on a pan, and fill the bucket to the brim with water.
    (A drop of dish soap will remove the meniscus (surface tension), allowing you to get a flat surface on the water.)
    - Wipe away any spillage from bucket and pan.
    - Tie a string around the stone.
    - Gently place the stone in the bucket. It will overflow into the pan.
    - Pull the stone out (so you don't spill any excess).
    - Take the bucket out of the pan.
    - Pour the pan contents into a measuring cup.
    - Read the volume from the measuring cup.
    - Convert to cm3 (1mL = 1cm3)
    3] Calculate the density in g/cm3.

    For reference, granite is about 2.75g/cm3.

    A stony meteorite will be about 7 - 8g/cm3
    Last edited by DaveC426913; 2017-Feb-27 at 07:00 PM.

  15. #15
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    I dont have a scale besides a bathroom scale but id say it weighs about a pound maybe a little less and here is a few pictures compared to a penny 20170227_140713.jpg20170227_141400.jpg 20170227_141419.jpg

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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveC426913 View Post
    It would be cool to get a measurement of its density.

    1] Weigh it (in grams).
    2] Measure its volume.
    - Put a small bucket or pitcher on a pan, and fill the bucket to the brim with water.
    (A drop of dish soap will remove the meniscus (surface tension), allowing you to get a flat surface on the water.)
    - Wipe away any spillage from bucket and pan.
    - Tie a string around the stone.
    - Gently place the stone in the bucket. It will overflow into the pan.
    - Pull the stone out (so you don't spill any excess).
    - Take the bucket out of the pan.
    - Pour the pan contents into a measuring cup.
    - Read the volume from the measuring cup.
    - Convert to cm3 (1mL = 1cm3)
    3] Calculate the density in g/cm3.

    For reference, granite is about 2.75g/cm3.

    A stony meteorite will be about 7 - 8g/cm3
    20170227_141419.jpg20170227_141400.jpg20170227_140713.jpg

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  17. 2017-Feb-27, 07:20 PM
    Reason
    Duplicates

  18. 2017-Feb-27, 07:25 PM
    Reason
    Duplicates

  19. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveC426913 View Post
    It would be cool to get a measurement of its density.

    1] Weigh it (in grams).
    2] Measure its volume.
    - Put a small bucket or pitcher on a pan, and fill the bucket to the brim with water.
    (A drop of dish soap will remove the meniscus (surface tension), allowing you to get a flat surface on the water.)
    - Wipe away any spillage from bucket and pan.
    - Tie a string around the stone.
    - Gently place the stone in the bucket. It will overflow into the pan.
    - Pull the stone out (so you don't spill any excess).
    - Take the bucket out of the pan.
    - Pour the pan contents into a measuring cup.
    - Read the volume from the measuring cup.
    - Convert to cm3 (1mL = 1cm3)
    3] Calculate the density in g/cm3.

    For reference, granite is about 2.75g/cm3.

    A stony meteorite will be about 7 - 8g/cm3
    Its weight is 131 grams not sure on the volume

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  20. 2017-Feb-27, 07:54 PM
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    Duplicates

  21. 2017-Feb-27, 07:54 PM
    Reason
    Duplicates

  22. #18
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    Frogman8555,

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  23. #19
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    Judging by the scale wrt the penny, I'll put its average diameter at 5.3cm.
    This gives a volume of ~78cm3.
    With a mass of 131g, that gives a density of about 1.7g/cm3.

    meteorite.jpg
    Last edited by DaveC426913; 2017-Feb-27 at 10:22 PM.

  24. #20
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    Hi Frogman,
    What did you think of the self-test check-list and Some Meteorite Realities, links I sent in my earlier post? Is seems to me that, you are at the point in your inquiry where you will need to saw your rock in two or cut off a side with a tile saw, or you might try a streak test.

    A type of rock that are often mistake for meteorites are those composed of iron oxides like hematite and magnetite because such rocks are denser than most common rocks. Hematite and magnetite can be recognized by the streak test. Scrap your rock against the unglazed side of a white ceramic tile or, the UNGLAZED bottom of a white coffee cup, or a toilet tank cover. Hematite and magnetite streaks are easy to make, almost like chalk on a sidewalk. Meteorites give NO streak or only a weak grayish streak, and only if you press hard. Absence of a streak does not indicate that the rock is a meteorite, since many terrestrial igneous rock will not give a streak.

    http://meteorites.wustl.edu/id/streak.htm


    Good luck and have fun.

  25. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glutomoto View Post
    Hi Frogman,
    What did you think of the self-test check-list and Some Meteorite Realities, links I sent in my earlier post? Is seems to me that, you are at the point in your inquiry where you will need to saw your rock in two or cut off a side with a tile saw, or you might try a streak test.

    A type of rock that are often mistake for meteorites are those composed of iron oxides like hematite and magnetite because such rocks are denser than most common rocks. Hematite and magnetite can be recognized by the streak test. Scrap your rock against the unglazed side of a white ceramic tile or, the UNGLAZED bottom of a white coffee cup, or a toilet tank cover. Hematite and magnetite streaks are easy to make, almost like chalk on a sidewalk. Meteorites give NO streak or only a weak grayish streak, and only if you press hard. Absence of a streak does not indicate that the rock is a meteorite, since many terrestrial igneous rock will not give a streak.

    http://meteorites.wustl.edu/id/streak.htm


    Good luck and have fun.
    Thanks for the check list it.. it helped alot i tried the streak test and it didnt leave a mark im not sure where to go from here id like to cut it in half but i dont have the tools for thqt

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  26. #22
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    Perhaps someone you know, or a friend of a friend, does tile work and has a tile saw. Maybe you could use some very rough sand paper, a grinder or a mill file like one uses to sharpen blades.

  27. #23
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    It doesn't look like a meteorite too rough looking. Has the appearance of pink granite with inclusions of quartz.

  28. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frogman8555 View Post
    [...] id like to cut it in half but i dont have the tools for that
    Sounds like an awesome demonstration project for some high- or other school teacher. Know any?
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  29. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by speach View Post
    It doesn't look like a meteorite too rough looking. Has the appearance of pink granite with inclusions of quartz.
    The shiny specs look metalic the crust is rough but i filed a small spot down and its perfectly smooth there is no red on the rock besides rust its black and metalic underneath

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  30. #26
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    I would guess ferruginous sandstone (an iron ore). Possibly an arkose depending on feldspar content.

    You may not want to do this but a geologist would take a hammer to the rock to examine an unweathered surface.

    Which Lake Erie beach in particular?

  31. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    I would guess ferruginous sandstone (an iron ore). Possibly an arkose depending on feldspar content.

    You may not want to do this but a geologist would take a hammer to the rock to examine an unweathered surface.

    Which Lake Erie beach in particular?
    In the Cleveland ohio area it was burried pretty deep in the sand if that helps

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  32. #28
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    My guess would be a lump of highly corroded actual iron.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  33. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    My guess would be a lump of highly corroded actual iron.
    Wouldnt iron stick to a magnet more. i put a magnet on it and it falls right off, there is barley a attraction. its flat on the bottom and the top is egg shaped. I filed a small spot down the top layer turns to dust but underneath seems like solid metal almost and the file runs smooth across it

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  34. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frogman8555 View Post
    Wouldnt iron stick to a magnet more. i put a magnet on it and it falls right off, there is barley a attraction. its flat on the bottom and the top is egg shaped. I filed a small spot down the top layer turns to dust but underneath seems like solid metal almost and the file runs smooth across it

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    You're probably correct. Do you have a hacksaw?
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

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