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Thread: Cold fresh water in the morning.

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buttercup View Post
    It just occurred to me (duh) that I apparently developed this fondness for cold water "first thing.
    Probably unrelated but can't hurt to be aware. A few years back I developed a craving for tall cold glasses of water. Craving is an understatement. I worshipped it. I lay in bed dreaming of having tall, freezing cold glasses of sweet, sweet water - wondered where it had been all my life.

    Turns out I was dehydrated due to uncontrolled Diabetes. My body, in an attempt to purge excess sugar, was urinating it out with my water reserves. I lost 25 pounds before I was diagnosed.

    Yours may not be quite so dramatic, but you might consider getting checked.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    Sure, that's what they said about Soylent Green.


    I'll pass on the plankton too.
    Dip me in ink and toss me to the Poets.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveC426913 View Post
    Probably unrelated but can't hurt to be aware. A few years back I developed a craving for tall cold glasses of water. Craving is an understatement. I worshipped it. I lay in bed dreaming of having tall, freezing cold glasses of sweet, sweet water - wondered where it had been all my life.

    Turns out I was dehydrated due to uncontrolled Diabetes. My body, in an attempt to purge excess sugar, was urinating it out with my water reserves. I lost 25 pounds before I was diagnosed.

    Yours may not be quite so dramatic, but you might consider getting checked.
    That's a totally valid concern. I do live in a desert - so we're often very dry. But it wouldn't hurt to get a checkup. I'm overdue for one.
    Dip me in ink and toss me to the Poets.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDon View Post
    Coffee for me in the morning.
    You have the start of the traditional three-course Scottish breakfast - a cup of coffee, a cigarette, and a good cough.

    Grant Hutchison

  5. #35
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    Sounds better than the "Hula Burger"

  6. #36
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    I have found memories of drinking water out of a ladle many many years ago.

  7. #37
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    Drinking from a dipper can sometimes create magical effects, was it a little ladle or a big ladle...perhaps both? ;-)

  8. #38
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    If I am sipping water a little at a time while working in hot weather, having ice in it is fine. If I need to drink a lot of water quickly, I don't want it that cold, as it hurts going down.

  9. #39
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    If I may take a moment to praise something that nowadays is demeaned and criticized. the lowly water fountain. As a child in all levels of public school and college I drank from them and not once died. What ever heavy metals or protozoa they harbored not once did I resist the anticipated cool liquid they gushed. Sometimes a little rusty but better than dehydrating on the sports field. Please all hail the water fountain.
    Just because you're a genius doesn't make you a smart guy

  10. #40
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    Yep. In Rhode Island, we called it a " Bubbler " . Of course it sounds like " Bubblah " . But they were held in esteem as a courtesy to all who needed a quick drink. It was a kinder, gentler time . Today there are schnooks who would charge you $2.00 ...yea $4.00 a bottle for it.
    My parents had a dug well , which I'm sure ...went back to the early 1800's which provided cool water year round for us. It had a small
    pine well shack, a small house about 50" tall and 36" by 36" with a peak . a cast iron axle and ornate handle with ratchet pall teeth on the inside served to hoist the clean galvanized bucket on a nice rope with an eye-spliced connection to the bucket . A stainless dipper on a chain hung on the inside, ever ready for an easy drink. Everyone respected and enjoyed the great well . And if power was out, we had water handy.
    " We know the worth of water when the well runs dry . "
    Poor Richard's Almanac .... Benjamin Franklin

  11. #41
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    Oh I so love good water.

    Where I live now uses filtered well water, on a rotating aquafer schedule. If I got this right the city uses three different aquafers, each for five years to allow the other two to recharge.
    Time wasted having fun is not time wasted - Lennon
    (John, not the other one.)

  12. #42
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    It was a fairly hot day in mid-August 1971, although I wasn't doing
    any work, just riding in a car with my family, but I was thirsty, and
    we stopped -- either intentially or by chance, I don't remember -- at a
    little stream only a few inches wide that I guess must have run under
    the road. It flowed downhill from somewhere above the road, I can
    only guess how far up.

    I took a double handfull, and it was pleasingly cold. It also had a
    jet black wiggly squiggly thing in it an inch or so long with lots of
    fancy appendages. Some kind of insect nymph. Maybe a mosquito.
    I'd read in the precursor of the Internet -- The Whole Earth Catalog --
    that such critters in the water were a good indication that it wasn't
    poisonous. So I let the wiggler go and took another double handfull
    of water, and it was the best-tasting water I ever drank. Concern
    about toxins seems reasonable since the water was flowing out of
    the side of Mount Mazama in Oregon -- a volcanic caldera.

    -- Jeff, in Minneapolis
    http://www.FreeMars.org/jeff/

    "I find astronomy very interesting, but I wouldn't if I thought we
    were just going to sit here and look." -- "Van Rijn"

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  13. #43
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    I have several glasses a day, but only before bedtime and at lunch. On rare occasions, I will drink water in the morning. There is actually a practical reason for my timing. I love to oversleep, but two tumblers of water before bed guarantees that doesn't happen. The glass at lunch is so I cut down on spicy foods. My stomach doesn't like spicy food anymore and water doesn't help put out the fire. So, no spicy food at lunch.

    The school has several restaurants which serve a lot of wonderful things, so it also saves me money. Lately, I have been all boring. A PB&J, an apple and water for lunch. Much cheaper than dining at school.
    Solfe, Dominus Maris Pavos.

  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    You have the start of the traditional three-course Scottish breakfast - a cup of coffee, a cigarette, and a good cough.

    Grant Hutchison
    Back in the 90's in Glasgow the coffee was substituted for Irn Bru. Probably because there wasn't any decent coffee in Glasgow at all as far as I could tell.

  15. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by loglo View Post
    Back in the 90's in Glasgow the coffee was substituted for Irn Bru. Probably because there wasn't any decent coffee in Glasgow at all as far as I could tell.
    Traditionally the Irn Bru was used if you had a hangover, to the extent that being seen sipping Irn Bru at any time in the morni ng will inevitably bring accusations of drinking the night before.
    When I was a student, it was the only time I drank Irn Bru. Years later, I bought a can of it after a day's hillwalking, and my companions pointed out that I was drinking it with my eyes closed - somehow, it seemed like the only way to do it.

    Grant Hutchison

  16. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    You have the start of the traditional three-course Scottish breakfast - a cup of coffee, a cigarette, and a good cough.

    Grant Hutchison
    My father gave up smoking the morning he lit his first Capstan Full Strength, took a draw and coughed so hard he collapsed one of his lungs. He did finish his coffee and wait two hours until 9am to 'phone the GP, despite a searing pain in the left side of his chest . . .

  17. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Root View Post
    It also had a
    jet black wiggly squiggly thing in it an inch or so long with lots of
    fancy appendages. Some kind of insect nymph. Maybe a mosquito.
    I'd read in the precursor of the Internet -- The Whole Earth Catalog --
    that such critters in the water were a good indication that it wasn't
    poisonous.
    Poisonous? Wild streams rarely are. But the presence of squiggly things you can see is an indicator of squiggly things you cannot see and some of those can be bad for your health. Filtration is my friend. Giardia is not.
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  18. #48
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    Continuing around the mountain, we eventually came to the park
    visitor's center, where I asked a ranger about the safety of drinking
    the water, and he opined that it should be fine as long as nobody
    dumped anything up above. I understood what kind of 'dump' he
    meant. I can't imagine anyone doing such a thing in that location
    and not -- um -- going out of their way to avoid doing it in a stream.

    When I said the stream was only inches wide, I really meant it.
    I don't remember if it was visible from the car, but I don't see how
    it could have been. It was almost completely hidden by vegetation
    that was itself just a few inches high, but here and there it showed
    through as it cascaded down the side of the mountain that must
    have been steeper than 45 degrees. I've long wondered where the
    water came out of the mountain in relation to the level of the lake
    in the crater. It looked very clear, aside from that wiggler. I didn't
    have a microscope with me, though.

    -- Jeff, in Minneapolis
    http://www.FreeMars.org/jeff/

    "I find astronomy very interesting, but I wouldn't if I thought we
    were just going to sit here and look." -- "Van Rijn"

    "The other planets? Well, they just happen to be there, but the
    point of rockets is to explore them!" -- Kai Yeves

  19. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heid the Ba' View Post
    My father gave up smoking the morning he lit his first Capstan Full Strength, took a draw and coughed so hard he collapsed one of his lungs. He did finish his coffee and wait two hours until 9am to 'phone the GP, despite a searing pain in the left side of his chest . . .
    My father gave up smoking the day my brother hit him in the face with a toy balloon filled with hydrogen. (There was a period in the late '40s when it was legal to give small children potentially explosive toys.) My father's cigarette burst the balloon and ignited the hydrogen - the gas from the freshly burst balloon was a long way from a stoichiometric mix, so he merely experienced a sheet of flame in front of his face, followed by an overhead Whoomph!, and he lost the front of his hair and his eyebrows.
    He'd been thinking of giving up smoking at the time, and he said his appearance in the bathroom mirror each morning made it easy not to absent-mindedly light up the first cigarette of the day.

    Grant Hutchison

  20. #50
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    I love learning random things from the internet. I'd never heard of "Irn Bru" before. I'll have to see if I can buy a bottle at the international market, a I did with Marmite and Vegemite.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  21. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Root View Post
    Continuing around the mountain, we eventually came to the park
    visitor's center, where I asked a ranger about the safety of drinking
    the water, and he opined that it should be fine as long as nobody
    dumped anything up above. I understood what kind of 'dump' he
    meant. I can't imagine anyone doing such a thing in that location
    and not -- um -- going out of their way to avoid doing it in a stream.
    Perhaps I'm cynical but I try not to underestimate the thoughtless that the anonymous "anyone" is capable of in wild areas. I've seen far too much of it, especially up here. Further, "anyone" needn't be a person. Giardiasis is also known as "beaver fever." Beaver, moose, and other furry excrement producers may not be so fastidious, either.

    On the other hand, I'm far less concerned about water coming directly from an underground wellspring. We have a popular one just a few miles south of Anchorage (Seward Highway, mile 109) that even has its own Facebook fan page. Heck, it even has a couple of Yelp reviews. People frequently stop to fill up bottles, jugs, or carboys. I've stopped a few times myself to fill a water bottle. As per the topic of this thread, it is fresh and very cold...cold enough to make my fingers ache on a couple of occasions.

    I'll also mention that much of the Anchorage area gets its municipal water from Eklutna Lake, which is fed by the Elutna glacier and the surrounding watershed. Eklutna Lake is less than 10 crow-miles from our house but we're not on municipal water.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  22. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Traditionally the Irn Bru was used if you had a hangover, to the extent that being seen sipping Irn Bru at any time in the morni ng will inevitably bring accusations of drinking the night before.
    When I was a student, it was the only time I drank Irn Bru. Years later, I bought a can of it after a day's hillwalking, and my companions pointed out that I was drinking it with my eyes closed - somehow, it seemed like the only way to do it.

    Grant Hutchison
    Ah - that explains why D.I.John Rebus is often drinking it in Ian Rankin's Edinburgh based crime novels & short stories. I knew what it was - and even tasted it, once only, in the UK in the 1970's. However, I wasn't aware of its reputation as a hangover "cure" - something Rebus needs quite often of course.

  23. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    Ah - that explains why D.I.John Rebus is often drinking it in Ian Rankin's Edinburgh based crime novels & short stories. I knew what it was - and even tasted it, once only, in the UK in the 1970's. However, I wasn't aware of its reputation as a hangover "cure" - something Rebus needs quite often of course.
    It also explains why my memories of Glasgow consist of the Ubiquitous Chip, Irn Bru and a certain lady who could drink me under the table.

  24. #54
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    At least you remember some of it . . .

  25. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    ...a toy balloon filled with hydrogen. (There was a period in the late '40s when it was legal to give small children potentially explosive toys.)..
    I did not know that they used to make hydrogen balloons commercially.

  26. #56
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    I don't recall hydrogen balloons being available but I did have a science kit that include instructions and materials for setting up an electrolysis experiment.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  27. #57
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    If I recall things correctly, a guy in the street with a gas cylinder would sell you a rubber balloon and fill it for you. I'm not sure if that's what you would mean by "making them commercially".

    Grant Hutchison

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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    I don't recall hydrogen balloons being available but I did have a science kit that include instructions and materials for setting up an electrolysis experiment.
    My Gilbert chemistry set had an experiment which produced chlorine gas, using a chemical from the set to which you added household bleach. Yike! And I did it more than once.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  29. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    My Gilbert chemistry set had an experiment which produced chlorine gas, using a chemical from the set to which you added household bleach. Yike! And I did it more than once.
    Borax, as I recall. I got in trouble for that one because I let my younger brother take a big whiff of it and had he a bit of a reaction...more drama than danger, I think but still.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  30. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    If I recall things correctly, a guy in the street with a gas cylinder would sell you a rubber balloon and fill it for you. I'm not sure if that's what you would mean by "making them commercially".

    Grant Hutchison
    In my high school days in the 1960s I would put a strong solution of lye in a soda bottle and then add aluminum foil. It would fizz and give off a lot of gas, which I would use to inflate balloons. The balloons were buoyant, and if lighted with a candle flame they popped with a brilliant sodium yellow flame, so I figured there was hydrogen in the mixture, along with a trace of sodium from the lye. Clearly the aluminum was displacing hydrogen from this strongly alkaline solution, though I have never figured out the reaction. It's simple with acid, but may be more complex with a strong alkali.

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