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Thread: Mathematician's Watch

  1. #1
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    Mathematician's Watch



    Can you figure them all out?
    Text messaging is a frivolous vanity feature, not something serious like vBulletin.

  2. #2
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    6.9999999... = 7

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    Quote Originally Posted by spare part View Post
    ...Can you figure them all out?
    Without Google! Just a calculator (I cannot do natural logarithms in my head)

    (spoiler - highlight to see)
    ratio of the opposite side to the adjacent side for a right angled triangle where these side are 45 degrees apart is 1
    square root of 4 is 2
    11 is 3 in binary - not sure why they would round a number in a representation that is only allowing integers!
    natural logarithm of 55 is 4.0073
    good old Pythagorus - 3^2+4^2=25, square root of this is 5
    3 factorial = 3x2x1 = 6
    As Torsten says 6.999999..=7
    16 / 2 = 8
    3x3 = 9
    g = 9.8 ~ 10
    B is 11 in hexadecimal but the o has me stumped - Python/C start hex representations with 0x, FORTRAN starts it with z. The Octal representation of hex b is not 11, which was my other thought.
    1100 is 12 in binary

    (/spoiler)

    So some confusion over 11. Others are not too obscure!

    This would not be a watch to be trying to read first thing in the morning.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shaula View Post
    Without Google! Just a calculator (I cannot do natural logarithms in my head)

    (spoiler - highlight to see)
    11 is 3 in binary - not sure why they would round a number in a representation that is only allowing integers!
    (/spoiler)

    ...
    Erm.

    (spoiler reply - highlight to see)
    I'm not so sure about that for "Round(11)". For 12 they show "11002" - with the subscript to indicate base. They don't include that subscript in the "Round(11)". A mathematicians' watch should be consistent!

    (Also, there's no reason why binary, which is just a base like any other, can only show integers. e.g. In decimal, 0.5 is one half. In binary, one half is 0.1, (i.e in binary, 0.1 + 0.1 = 1.0). Each digit is valued at base^position, with positions to the right of the decimal being -1, -2, ...; so the first decimal place in binary is 2^-1, which is one half, the next is 2^-2, which is one quarter, etc.)

    ... having said that, either way that particular number seems an integer, so the rounding is pointless anyway.

    ... ... and having said that, I've got no better answer for 3!

    (/spoiler)
    Last edited by pzkpfw; 2017-Apr-17 at 09:46 AM.
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    Yeah, I wasn't sure about my number 3 either. But you know, putting down nothing for a question gets you no points in an exam! I should have added a note about that alongside mentioning my confusion on 11. Original version before I posted had 11 and 3 as ??.

    You know I have never seen anyone use decimal points in binary representations! I'd have not even thought to do that. You live and learn.

    Edit to add:

    Oh, wait wait wait....

    (spoiler)
    Is three meant to be round(pi) but the top of the symbol is cut off?
    Last edited by Shaula; 2017-Apr-17 at 11:13 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shaula View Post
    Oh, wait wait wait....

    (spoiler)
    Is three meant to be round(pi) but the top of the symbol is cut off?
    Yes, the version of this watch I've seen (in the form of a large clock) made that typographically clear. I suspect the one in the picture is the product of a sequence of typeface changes and copying by people who didn't understand the original.

    Grant Hutchison

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Yes, the version of this watch I've seen (in the form of a large clock) made that typographically clear. I suspect the one in the picture is the product of a sequence of typeface changes and copying by people who didn't understand the original.
    You gotta admit, that's funny.

    Why a mathematician would use g for ten is also suspect. Why not use that Round function again?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shaula View Post
    ...
    You know I have never seen anyone use decimal points in binary representations! I'd have not even thought to do that. You live and learn.
    ...
    I believe that in that context, it's a "binary point" not a decimal point.

    Why not "Int(pi symbol)" for three?

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    Here is a version of the same watchface (there are several different varieties), which shows something typographically interesting going on with the "11" symbol, too.

    Spoiler: (Highlight this box to see the hidden message.)
    So I guess this started life as "0B", a two-digit representation of 11 in hex, and has mutated to "ob".


    Grant Hutchison
    Last edited by grant hutchison; 2017-Apr-17 at 12:57 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Here is a version of the same watchface (there are several different varieties), which shows something typographically interesting going on with the "11" symbol, too.

    Spoiler: (Highlight this box to see the hidden message.)
    So I guess this started life as "0B", a two-digit representation of 11 in hex, and has mutated to "ob".
    Almost a capital pi, so that fits with the rounding thing, if your intent is to make fun of mathematics. I mean, make math fun.

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    Quote Originally Posted by grapes View Post
    Almost a capital pi, so that fits with the rounding thing, if your intent is to make fun of mathematics. I mean, make math fun.
    Well, on this occasion I was talking about the symbol that subsitutes for 11 on the watch dial.
    But, yes, what looked like "11" in the OP watch's symbol for 3, is rendered "II" in the image I linked to. You can see how this typographical mutation has been taking place, slowly eroding sense into nonsense. The watch I linked to is evidently an earlier example from the evolutionary chain.

    Grant Hutchison

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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Here is a version of the same watchface (there are several different varieties), which shows something typographically interesting going on with the "11" symbol, too.
    I still cannot find which language just uses 0 as a Hex prefix though. If they were really mathematicians it'd be the FORTRAN or R representation*!

    *Z'B' / 'B'Z or 0xB I believe

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shaula View Post
    I still cannot find which language just uses 0 as a Hex prefix though.
    Not as a hex prefix - just a zero placeholder in a two-digit representation. Common enough to see Dec 11 as Hex 0B in ASCII tables. Here is one, for instance.

    Grant Hutchison

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    I got stuck on g. What came into my head was 32.2.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    6.9999999... = 7

    No it isn't!

    Yes it is!

    ...

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    This is also a mathematician's watch:



    It is the whole numbers from one to twelve. I believe mathematicians use them too.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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    There was a story about this mathematician that got hit by a car.
    "Did you get the license plate number?" the cops ask him.
    He replies that it was pretty close to the square root of 500,000 in base eight.
    Last edited by DonM435; 2017-Apr-17 at 06:19 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DonM435 View Post
    No it isn't!

    Yes it is!

    ...
    So long as no one accuses me of baiting.

    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    This is also a mathematician's watch:



    It is the whole numbers from one to twelve. I believe mathematicians use them too.
    That picture reminds me of a Timex commercial from the '70s. The ad has a man explaining why, whenever Timex shows a closeup of a watch face, the time is around 1:50. Two reasons; the hands nicely cradle the brand name, and because the commercials often aired in the evenings, say, around 10:00, they didn't want people saying, "Hey, that watch is wrong".

    ETA: So I searched for the ad and didn't find it, but did see one where the time is about 9:40. That was one where a dolphin takes it for a swim. Hmmm, maybe meant for afternoon airing.
    Last edited by Torsten; 2017-Apr-17 at 08:00 PM.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonM435 View Post
    There was a story about this mathematician that got hit by a car.
    "Did you get the license plate number?" the cops ask him.
    He replies that it was pretty close to the square root of 500,000 in base eight.
    Then there's the true story about Srinavasa Ramanujan, and the taxi G.H. Hardy took when he visited him in hospital one day.
    When Hardy remarked that the taxi number, 1729, was a rather boring number, Ramanujan immediately responded that it was actually very interesting, because it was the smallest number expressible as the sum of two cubes in two different ways (1+12 or 9+10).

    Grant Hutchison

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    There's an urban legend that time is shown on clock faces as it is because it's the hour at which Abraham Lincoln died.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

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    The person in the office next to me has the clock in the OP but in a more legible typography (white on green, like a chalkboard and the characters mimic the chalkboard.) He's head of engineering. I'm in accounting.

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