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Thread: Gravitational waves and the Big Bang

  1. #1
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    Gravitational waves and the Big Bang

    If there is no huge gravitational wave being measured, does that mean that there never was any explosion leading to the Big Bang?


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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by philippeb8 View Post
    If there is no huge gravitational wave being measured, does that mean that there never was any explosion leading to the Big Bang?
    Only if you assume our crude tools detect gravitational waves well in the the expected Big Bang range.

    You don't assume that do you?
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by 01101001 View Post
    SMBH mergers: way higher frequency.

    This is a helpful diagram I just rediscovered for the speed of gravitational waves thread: Caltech: Gravitational Wave Spectrum. It shows the difference between LISA sensitivity and LIGO, and likely event types. Text there estimates SMBH binaries at 1/year, optimistically.
    The second link in 01101001's post shows where waves from the cosmic microwave background would be and they are just out of the detection of our current detectors.
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  4. #4
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    Gravitational waves and the Big Bang

    Quote Originally Posted by 01101001 View Post
    Only if you assume our crude tools detect gravitational waves well in the the expected Big Bang range.

    You don't assume that do you?
    I assume the Big Bang should be measurable by our tools if we can detect neutron stars orbiting themselves... even if it was billion of years ago.


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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    The second link in 01101001's post shows where waves from the cosmic microwave background would be and they are just out of the detection of our current detectors.
    Ok thanks I didn't see that link for some reason.


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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by philippeb8 View Post
    I assume the Big Bang should be measurable by our tools if we can detect neutron stars orbiting themselves... even if it was billion of years ago.
    Yeah, that would be a mistake. Here's the sort of tool you need to observe the Big Bang's gravitational-wave spectrum: Wikipedia: Big Bang Observer

    The BBO instruments present massive technological challenges. Funding has not been allocated for development, and even optimistic estimates place the instrument's launch date many decades away.
    For now, baby steps.
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    Skepticism enables us to distinguish fancy from fact, to test our speculations. --Carl Sagan

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by 01101001 View Post
    Yeah, that would be a mistake. Here's the sort of tool you need to observe the Big Bang's gravitational-wave spectrum: Wikipedia: Big Bang Observer



    For now, baby steps.
    Thanks for the clarification.


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