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Thread: Marketing Spin

  1. #271
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    I just saw a TV commercial for some kind of ointment named "Elysium".

    Maybe it's just me, but naming your product after a dystopian sci-fi movie doesn't sound like a good idea.
    Even if they came up with the name first, naming your product after "the abode of the blessed after death" doesn't sound prudent.

    That reminds me of the hot air balloon tour company named "Icarus Balloon" near my old home.
    When I mentioned it, they responded that "We know, but 'Daedalus' seemed like a worse name".
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  2. #272
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    I just saw a TV commercial for some kind of ointment named "Elysium".
    Aches and pains from your exoskeleton?
    Headaches from the download into your neural implant?
    Can't get to a Med-Bay quick enough?


    Try Elysium
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  3. #273
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    I just saw a TV commercial for some kind of ointment named "Elysium".

    Maybe it's just me, but naming your product after a dystopian sci-fi movie doesn't sound like a good idea.
    Even if they came up with the name first, naming your product after "the abode of the blessed after death" doesn't sound prudent.

    That reminds me of the hot air balloon tour company named "Icarus Balloon" near my old home.
    When I mentioned it, they responded that "We know, but 'Daedalus' seemed like a worse name".
    I always thought it seemed odd for NASA to name one of their shuttles, which launched over the Atlantic Ocean, after something famous primarily for sinking into the Atlantic Ocean.

    ...and for ships, sports teams, pickup trucks, or anything else you'd expect people to name to sound "tough", to get named "titan(s/ic)"; the original titans' entire role in their story was to have lost.

  4. #274
    I've heard some one is planning on building Titanic II.
    https://www.sun-sentinel.com/travel/...030-story.html
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
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  5. #275
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Backroad Astronomer View Post
    I've heard some one is planning on building Titanic II.
    https://www.sun-sentinel.com/travel/...030-story.html
    Be very cautious of anything said by that person. A very shonky businessman, failed politician and generally unpleasant character renowned for his inability to recognise the truth even if it ran over him.

  6. #276
    If this one is built it will have life boats.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
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  7. #277
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Backroad Astronomer View Post
    I've heard some one is planning on building Titanic II.
    https://www.sun-sentinel.com/travel/...030-story.html
    It seems this link is not available in Europe. I presume it is the same as discussed in this wikipedia article.

  8. #278
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eclogite View Post
    It seems this link is not available in Europe. I presume it is the same as discussed in this wikipedia article.
    You presume correctly.

  9. #279
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    I'm looking at getting a fancy espresso maker for the new house, because it can probably pay for itself pretty quickly compared to the daily Starbucks run. (Hmm, maybe I need a spreadsheet!)

    Anyhow, here's an ad for one, containing the following text: (My bold)
    Design your espresso experience with the De'Longhi Magnifica fully automatic espresso machine. Enjoy authentic Italian barista quality espresso drinks; single and double espresso, cappuccinos and lattes with De'Longhi's Manual Cappuccino System.
    Hmmm, which is it?
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  10. #280
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    Espressos are automatic and cappuccinos are manual? Its that foam, you know.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  11. #281
    Sounds like a hot subject.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
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  12. #282
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    Steamy!
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  13. #283
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I'm looking at getting a fancy espresso maker for the new house, because it can probably pay for itself pretty quickly compared to the daily Starbucks run. (Hmm, maybe I need a spreadsheet!)

    Anyhow, here's an ad for one, containing the following text: (My bold)

    Hmmm, which is it?
    This is the Greased Lightning edition. You know, it's automatic with a four speed on the floor.

  14. #284
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    The current thing in the automotive world is, of course, double-clutch transmission with flappy paddles on the wheel, a sophisticated manual box with the ability to have a computer shift it.

    And of course, there was the pushbutton automatic in a co-worker's Renault 10 back in the 1970's. It was basically a completely standard manual trans and clutch with a suitcase-sized box full of relays to make it shift for itself. He bought a shift lever and clutch pedal for it and made it back to what it should have been.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  15. #285
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    Marketing Spin

    My spouse’s car has shift paddles, and I hate them. I feel like a “poser” when using them. But then, I learned to drive on a manual transmission, and shifting without a clutch just seems wrong.

    Now, please excuse me while I go outside and chase kids off my lawn.

    ETA: I’m okay with fully automatic transmissions, but my left foot sometimes feels left out.

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    Last edited by Extravoice; 2018-Nov-10 at 10:33 AM.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  16. #286
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    I never learned how to drive a stick shift. Nor do I see the need for them anymore. We have a better way now! Buggy whips and spats anyone?
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  17. #287
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    Question for our European members: are manual transmissions still popular there?


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  18. #288
    The only time I learned a manual was on a tractor 20 years ago, and that had one lever to get hi and low gears and another on for the gears.
    From the wilderness to the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
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  19. #289
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    Question for our European members: are manual transmissions still popular there?
    They dominate in the UK. Driving with an automatic doesn't qualify as driving in my book! Automatics tend to be found in higher end vehicles. That said, automatics are becoming more common.

  20. #290
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I'm looking at getting a fancy espresso maker for the new house, because it can probably pay for itself pretty quickly compared to the daily Starbucks run. (Hmm, maybe I need a spreadsheet!)

    Anyhow, here's an ad for one, containing the following text: (My bold)

    Hmmm, which is it?
    A word of advice from experience, don't go for the automatics. Get a decent twin boiler manual and use the money saved to get a decent grinder. Manuals are quicker once you get used to them. Automatics like the Delonghi need to be cleaned after every use or they clog up and break down.

    Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk

  21. #291
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    Question for our European members: are manual transmissions still popular there?


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    Belgium: small increase of automatics in the last decade, but still predominantly manuals. You won't impress anyone here by saying you can drive stick, because everyone and their granny can do it too. That's why I do double declutching. Others can't do that, which makes me their shifting overlord. Their nanny might though, if she predates the synchronized gearbox.

  22. #292
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    Belgium: small increase of automatics in the last decade, but still predominantly manuals. You won't impress anyone here by saying you can drive stick, because everyone and their granny can do it too. That's why I do double declutching. Others can't do that, which makes me their shifting overlord. Their nanny might though, if she predates the synchronized gearbox.
    Ayuh. Synchomesh is for wimps. So are automatic spark advance and electric start. Bah. Modern crap.

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  23. #293
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    So it's for bragging rights? No wonder manual is still around. No doubt someone will find a way to make an electric with a gearbox!
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  24. #294
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    Quote Originally Posted by swampyankee View Post
    Ayuh. Synchomesh is for wimps. So are automatic spark advance and electric start. Bah. Modern crap.
    If your car does not use leather in the driveshaft, I discard it as a modern fad that will soon pass.

  25. #295
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    So it's for bragging rights? No wonder manual is still around. No doubt someone will find a way to make an electric with a gearbox!
    My impression for the continuing dominance of manual transmission in Europe is that gasoline / petrol is three times the price and manuals get better gas mileage. Tradition is probably some of it too.

    It has always made me uncomfortable/unhappy that I get semi-shamed for not knowing how to drive manual, even in the US (I know the concept, but not the practice). My dad always had automatics and that's what I learned on, and over the years, when I've asked people if they would teach me, they have said no ("you'll ruin my clutch"). I'm now older enough that I'm not going to bother learning, but it still bothers me that I'm made to feel like some sort of lesser human because I don't.
    Last edited by Swift; 2018-Nov-11 at 08:11 PM.
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  26. #296
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    My impression for the continuing dominance of manual transmission in Europe is that gasoline / petrol is three times the price and manuals get better gas mileage. Tradition is probably some of it too.

    It has always made me uncomfortable/unhappy that I get semi-shamed for not knowing how to drive manual, even in the US (I know the concept, but not the practice). My dad always had automatics and that's what I learned on, and over the years, when I've asked people if they would teach me, they have said no ("you'll ruin my clutch"). I'm now older enough that I'm not going to bother learning, but it still bothers me that I'm made to feel like some sort of lesser human because I don't.
    I am certainly not going to have a go at someone who only had an auto to learn on - you have to take what you can. Over here if you obtained your drivers licence on an automatic vehicle your are not legally permitted to drive a manual vehicle which of course can be a nuisance. I learnt on a 1961 manual car in the 1970's - 3 speed column shift with no synchro on first gear. Both my kids got their licences on manual cars which has been useful as they have both have had to drive work and 4WD vehicles, which until recently, were almost all manuals. Some statistics - hopefully reasonable accurate - say that Europe still has about 80% manual cars and Australia about 30% - but dropping rapidly. The U.S. was said to have about 4% manuals. I think the difference in fuel consumption between manuals and automatics has been drastically reduced over the years and that these days newer "auto" transmissions like the Dual Clutch ones get better fuel consumption

    When I have rented cars in Europe they have been manuals - and it does take a little time to get used to changing gear with your right rather than left hand. Plus of course the driving on the other side of the road thing. It was much easier driving automatic rental cars in Canada.

  27. #297
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    It has always made me uncomfortable/unhappy that I get semi-shamed for not knowing how to drive manual...
    People shouldn’t get too smug about being able to drive a stick shift. No special talent is required; all it really takes is practice.

    I was quite good at it*, yet I can’t play basketball because it requires the physical coordination to bounce a ball and run at the same time.

    *Haven’t owned a “manual” in years.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  28. #298
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    Depends on where you are in the spectrum: try rally driving a standard 3 pedal manual car. So if you want to get any life from the box, that means double declutching downshifts, and depending on how brave your synchro's are, also some upshifts. And on some sections, you have to do this continuously. Preferably while doing the required steering effort as well. Physical coordination doesn't begin to describe it. I found it helpful that I had played organ including foot pedals in earlier years. The required physical coordination means practice, practice, practice until it becomes muscle memory.

    For just driving around a manual car, it's indeed something anyone can master with some schooling and a little bit of practice. It's no wizardry or extreme talent or anything. After a while it will too become muscle memory, but also without that you can manage just fine once you develop a bit of feel for it. As I said, everyone's granny can drive a manual if they've learned it, so it's really nothing to take big pride in.

  29. #299
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    The U.S, Army briefly attempted to teach me to drive a stick shift.

    I made a 2.5 ton truck jump like a bunny. Lesson terminated.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

  30. #300
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    We all did that when learning. People always say they won't let you learn to drive stick in their car because you'd ruin the clutch, but the truth is you'd ruin the shocks.

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