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Thread: Lost, or not lost. The Argentinian submarine.

  1. #31
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    Batteries shouldn't be needed to surface, they should be able to blow the tanks manually.
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  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by captain swoop View Post
    Batteries shouldn't be needed to surface, they should be able to blow the tanks manually.
    As I stated, below a certain depth that may not be enough to achieve positive buoyancy.

  3. #33
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    A report on the last message from the ARA San Juan:

    "Entry of seawater by ventilation system to battery tank No. 3 caused a short circuit and the beginning of a fire in the balcony of battery bars, bow batteries out of service, at the time of immersion, propelling with a split circuit. I will keep staff informed," Pedro Martín Fernández informed in a message via radio frequency.

    The San Juan has four battery banks (located in 'tanks'). With the forward banks out-of-service, they were operating on half capacity to begin with. A fire in one of the aft banks could be catastrophic as it would put both remaining battery banks in jeopardy.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by captain swoop View Post
    Batteries shouldn't be needed to surface, they should be able to blow the tanks manually.
    The Piccard bathyscaphes were designed to fail-safe by having containers of iron shot ballast attached by electromagnets, so that if power were to be lost, the lack of current would cause it to fall and the craft to rise. But those were very specialized research craft, not mainstream designs.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    The Piccard bathyscaphes were designed to fail-safe by having containers of iron shot ballast attached by electromagnets, so that if power were to be lost, the lack of current would cause it to fall and the craft to rise. But those were very specialized research craft, not mainstream designs.
    Yeah, naval warships are not designed to be 'fail-safe' in that manner. They're more designed to fail in a manner that allows the mission to remain uncompromised. I'm reminded of the 'battle short' switch on the reactor control panel on my sub (and all other US nuclear subs) that disables all reactor protection circuits.

  6. #36
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    I spent three days on HMS Otter back in the 80s, a diesel electric boat, I was there as part of an exercise.
    I had to do the escape tower at Gosport first.
    Serving aboard was not on my 'must do' list.
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  7. #37
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    The San Juan has been found by an American undersea mapping company in 3000 feet of water.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/17/w...ine-found.html

  8. #38
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    My oldest son served in the US Navy on a submarine, the U.S.S. Hartford. Reports like this are distressing, no matter whose sub it is.
    There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.
    — Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1883)

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